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-   -   Would you buy a horse who is known to buck? (http://www.horseforum.com/horse-training/would-you-buy-horse-who-known-119791/)

Golden Horse 04-12-2012 08:29 PM

Would you buy a horse who is known to buck?
 
If you were offered the chance to buy a really nice horse the right breed, nice color, good looking boy, at a quarter of market price, because of a bucking issue, would you?

Horse is described like this

Quote:

He was born May 03, 2003 and I have owned him for almonst 3.5 years. Initially, I was working with a trainer (as he was very green) and I am a fairly novice rider. He did buck me off on our first outside ride (spooked) however I continued to ride him (indoors) and had a professional continue his outside training. A few months later, I moved and he pretty much has been out to pasture ever since. I had hopes of building a riding arena on our property but that isn't going to happen and I am moving again into the city.

thesilverspear 04-12-2012 08:35 PM

Probably not. As I'm happy starting my own, I would not buy a youngster who a self-confessed novice rider has messed up a bit when I could buy one that is more or less a clean slate.

But what is it?

oh vair oh 04-12-2012 08:36 PM

That horse doesn't have a bucking issue, it has a rider issue. Green horse + novice rider = spooking. Lets the trainer train him, which is good, and then puts him out to pasture, so he's probably forgotten a bit. Doesn't sound like a horse who is "known to buck". All horses buck when they are spooked, it's a natural reflex, especially when they have an unconfident green rider.

A horse with a "bucking issue" is a horse that bucks with malicious intent to unseat the rider under normal riding circumstances. It can be worked with by a skilled rider or trainer.

A green horse I would buy, a malicious horse I would not.

smrobs 04-12-2012 08:40 PM

I would have to agree with silverspear, it's not so much the single bucking incident that bothers me, it's the fact that he was very green broke by a novice rider before being turned out. That makes me wonder how many other training problems you'd have to correct aside from the possible bucking.

boots 04-12-2012 09:29 PM

For the right price I'd give that horse a shot.

Guy I work for just bought a couple that had only 30 days of walk/trot and were then pasture puffs for 6 (!) years. They are coming along. One bucked, one didn't.

tbstorm 04-12-2012 09:33 PM

Doesnt sound like a "bucking problem". Guess it depends if you're looking for that kind of project or not.

BarrelracingArabian 04-12-2012 09:35 PM

I would say it depends on the degree, this horse seems to not have a history he just spooked had a novice rider on him which equalled a fall. I think he would be worth going out to look at, knowing he will need work of course since he was ridden by a novice then stuck out to pasture.

Golden Horse 04-12-2012 09:35 PM

More info


Quote:

. I haven't ridden him since we moved tin July 2009 and prior to that I rode him in an indoor riding arena where he was fine, as mentioned in my ad I also have a trainer ride him outside for aprox. 6 months. I first bought him as 'green-broke' however couldn't get near him with a saddle when he arrived.

I then sent him to off for two months to be professionally broke and continued working with him for aprox. 9 months thereafter. We were doing great until I rode him outside for the first time and he spooked and bucked me off.....not going to lie, it shook me but I continued to ride him for another 2-3 months without incident.

He does have good traits such as easy to catch, good grand manners etc and was a smooth ride however he will need quite a bit of work (I would assume) to get back to where he was....hence the low price. One thing though is that he is a little difficult to load (3 out of the 4 times I've loaded him into a trailer it took a while and 1 time he just walked in).

themacpack 04-12-2012 09:39 PM

I would visit and evaluate the horse for myself. I would not automatically discount the horse, especially based on the description provided.

oh vair oh 04-12-2012 09:40 PM

Meh. I'd pass. If she hasn't ridden the horse in 4 years, and the training before that was barely breaking at best, then you're looking at re-breaking an older horse. At 2003, you're breaking a 10 year old. No thanks.


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