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Skyseternalangel 05-12-2012 01:31 AM

First Trailer Experiences?
 
Alright guys, I have a trailer on my wish list. I know nothing about trailers, nor about buying them. Honestly if there were a "trailer buying and specs for dummies" book, that would be the book for me!

I have a tall horse, he's 17hh at the withers so I'm guessing at least a 7 ft tall trailer ceiling? I think I want a slant load, because the straight loads look very hard to unload horses out of (what's with the half doors on the side?

I also rather have a gooseneck but since I don't have a truck at the moment (in my future also!) probably it's going to be a bumper pull.

So what did you look for when you first bought your trailer?

What are the important things/ must haves for a trailer?

Does the trailer material/age/design matter?

Any other information you can provide. This thread isn't just for me, but for everyone that is looking to buy a trailer and has no clue.

Thanks!

SorrelHorse 05-12-2012 01:52 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Skyseternalangel (Post 1496584)
Alright guys, I have a trailer on my wish list. I know nothing about trailers, nor about buying them. Honestly if there were a "trailer buying and specs for dummies" book, that would be the book for me!

I have a tall horse, he's 17hh at the withers so I'm guessing at least a 7 ft tall trailer ceiling? I think I want a slant load, because the straight loads look very hard to unload horses out of (what's with the half doors on the side?

Look for something "warmblood sized" would be my opinion. And the half doors are escape doors. It's so that way when you load your horse, you can get out that door instead of walking behind them, or if your horse panics you have somewhere to go.

I also rather have a gooseneck but since I don't have a truck at the moment (in my future also!) probably it's going to be a bumper pull.

So what did you look for when you first bought your trailer?

Well...I had my trainer and my parents with me.(I got it for my sixteenth birthday, I teensy little two horse straight load....Cheap but solid and I love it!) Basically I would just be sure the FLOORS are solid. Pull out the mats, make sure the wood isn't rotting or anything, then be sure there's no hazards inside (Sharp pieces of metal, loose dividers, stuff like that) Also make sure the lights/tags are good.

What are the important things/ must haves for a trailer?

Make sure you have the ball to tow it with :) I always seem to buy the wrong size when I am sent to get them. I now write it on my hand, a piece of paper in my pocket, and on my phone....LOL

Does the trailer material/age/design matter?

I would look at online reviews myself. Some people have personal preferences on material. Age isn't a huge factor so long as everything is still in good shape. Design is also personal preference...

Any other information you can provide. This thread isn't just for me, but for everyone that is looking to buy a trailer and has no clue.

Thanks!

So my response is in bold. I like having a step-down trailer with the excape door, I like slant load better but straight load is good too. The only thing with straight loads is that some horses don't like to back out of them. Mine have never had a problem in my two horse trailer or in the straight load stock trailer my mom has, but you never know. Horses have a preference too!

Skyseternalangel 05-12-2012 01:55 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by SorrelHorse (Post 1496597)
So my response is in bold. I like having a step-down trailer with the excape door, I like slant load better but straight load is good too. The only thing with straight loads is that some horses don't like to back out of them. Mine have never had a problem in my two horse trailer or in the straight load stock trailer my mom has, but you never know. Horses have a preference too!

Thank you for all of your answers! And yes great point. I just.. don't understand how you can get out of the escape door without falling flat on your face or getting one leg stuck out and one leg stuck in.

:D

SorrelHorse 05-12-2012 02:31 AM

I know from experience that when you have a 1200lb tank panicking and jumping at you, you FIND ways to get out that door without getting stuck.

usandpets 05-12-2012 06:23 AM

Where to start... I just would like to correct some information. The half doors are actually access doors, so you can access the front while the horse is in the trailer. The only reason people call them "escape" doors is because they haven't trained the horse to properly load. I sure as heck would not want to be in any trailer if the horse is questionable about loading or handling. The proper way to load a horse is with you standing on the outside. Then you use the access door to secure or tie the horse.

As for a straight load being hard to unload a horse, that goes back to being able to properly load and unload a horse. Any horse can back out of a trailer. It's just when people decide its easier for the horse or themselves to let the horse turn around. If the horse is bad about backing out, it just takes a little time and patience to train them to do it.

Now to answer some of your first questions. The type or style is just preference. Enclosed is more protective of the horse and a stock has more chance of debris going in. However, a stock will allow more air flow. Good for in the summer but not in the winter. Steel trailers are heavy but usually are cheaper to buy. Fiberglass and aluminum are more expensive to buy but are lighter and cost less in fuel to haul. Slants are easier to load and easier for the horse to load. Straight loads usually aren't as wide.

You said you don't have a truck to haul the trailer. What are you going to use until then? Just because a vehicle can tow a trailer does not mean it can haul a horse trailer. It needs to have the proper towing capacities and equipment. It should have a transmission cooler and the proper brakes, not to mention enough power under the hood. You'll need to have a brake controller for the electric brakes in the trailer. Those vary too. Some you can set manually but can mount them pretty much anywhere. Then there are the automatic ones and the have to be mounted perfectly level and kept level.

Just because a trailer is called a bumper pull does not mean it can be pulled with a ball on the bumper. Not all bumpers are the same. The reason they are called that is from where they attach to the vehicle, at the rear of the vehicle by the bumper. Not all bumpers are strong enough for a horse trailer, even on a truck. You should use a receiver hitch and one that is rated for the weight of the trailer. You also will probably need to install or have installed a connector for the trailer wires which is also for the brake controller.

So you can see, getting a trailer is more than just picking out the trailer.

One last thing. Get a bigger trailer than you think, if possible. If you want a two horse, get a three horse. A couple years down the road and a couple other horses and friends that want to ride to, you'll be glad you did. We wish we did and I hear it from many others too.
Posted via Mobile Device

Skyseternalangel 05-12-2012 06:55 AM

Thanks usandpets. I definitely don't plan on buying a trailer right now, just it's something I will end up buying and a truck won't be far behind. But thanks for clarifying that not just any vehicle can haul a horse. I know a lot of people (including my father) who believe if it can tow then it can handle a trailer... how wrong he is.

Thanks for clarifying everything. I still need to get knowledgeable with loading and unloading. Sky, my horse, is a pro loader. I could probably load him loose without problems but I've never learned a certain "way."

I also appreciate your advice to get something a step up than I need. Never know maybe I'll meet some people and we'll haul to shows or trials or trails together.

Thanks!

Skyseternalangel 05-13-2012 08:55 AM

Anyone else?

PaintHorseMares 05-13-2012 09:15 AM

I prefer the combo/stock trailers with removeable dividers/chest/butt bars....roomier, good ventilation, etc. Even in the winter, they are protected from most of the wind and our mares don't mind (they are out in the weather 24x7 anyway). Also, you can use a stock trailer to haul anything...we've hauled hay, furniture, lumber, etc. rather than needing a utility trailer also.
I prefer aluminum since they are much lighter and don't rust but we settled on steel since there is a big difference in the price.

churumbeque 05-13-2012 10:48 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by usandpets (Post 1496679)
Where to start... I just would like to correct some information. The half doors are actually access doors, so you can access the front while the horse is in the trailer. The only reason people call them "escape" doors is because they haven't trained the horse to properly load. I sure as heck would not want to be in any trailer if the horse is questionable about loading or handling. The proper way to load a horse is with you standing on the outside. Then you use the access door to secure or tie the horse.

As for a straight load being hard to unload a horse, that goes back to being able to properly load and unload a horse. Any horse can back out of a trailer. It's just when people decide its easier for the horse or themselves to let the horse turn around. If the horse is bad about backing out, it just takes a little time and patience to train them to do it.

Now to answer some of your first questions. The type or style is just preference. Enclosed is more protective of the horse and a stock has more chance of debris going in. However, a stock will allow more air flow. Good for in the summer but not in the winter. Steel trailers are heavy but usually are cheaper to buy. Fiberglass and aluminum are more expensive to buy but are lighter and cost less in fuel to haul. Slants are easier to load and easier for the horse to load. Straight loads usually aren't as wide.

You said you don't have a truck to haul the trailer. What are you going to use until then? Just because a vehicle can tow a trailer does not mean it can haul a horse trailer. It needs to have the proper towing capacities and equipment. It should have a transmission cooler and the proper brakes, not to mention enough power under the hood. You'll need to have a brake controller for the electric brakes in the trailer. Those vary too. Some you can set manually but can mount them pretty much anywhere. Then there are the automatic ones and the have to be mounted perfectly level and kept level.

Just because a trailer is called a bumper pull does not mean it can be pulled with a ball on the bumper. Not all bumpers are the same. The reason they are called that is from where they attach to the vehicle, at the rear of the vehicle by the bumper. Not all bumpers are strong enough for a horse trailer, even on a truck. You should use a receiver hitch and one that is rated for the weight of the trailer. You also will probably need to install or have installed a connector for the trailer wires which is also for the brake controller.

So you can see, getting a trailer is more than just picking out the trailer.

One last thing. Get a bigger trailer than you think, if possible. If you want a two horse, get a three horse. A couple years down the road and a couple other horses and friends that want to ride to, you'll be glad you did. We wish we did and I hear it from many others too.
Posted via Mobile Device

This is very true, all of this post. They are more of an access door. I never had to go in and lead a horse in. If anything when I had a horse that had never been hauled to load I ran a lunge line from horse to front of the trailer and back to lead the horse in so you never have to be in the trailer. As the horse moved forward I take up the slack. Sometimes I ran a line behind the horse to encourage them in. I would be in the rear to be able to put up the butt bar and close the door. Then go up front and secure the horse. I would do this with the escapre door shut so the horse didn't try and go out the door.

HarleyWood 05-13-2012 05:52 PM

well i have a straight load, and its not bad i just tap their butts and they usally back up or i tug their tails and then they do back out. the half door is so you can get out without haveing to squish by them to get out. i and hoping to get a straight load but a 3 horse! i would like a newer one, but doesnt matter as long as its not rusted out, and would like a wall(?) thing that goes down to the floor, for the first stall...


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