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Sophie19 05-21-2012 03:31 PM

Hay Issues
 
The property owner where I keep my horse is having hay cut tomorrow. I have read that you need to let the bales sit for a while before you store them to let them dry out. How long do they need to sit?

Also it is a very big pasture. It's probably about 40 acres. I don't own a truck, but am planning to rent one to bring in the hay. Is this to big of a job for just me and my husband to conquer by ourselves?

Wallee 05-21-2012 03:36 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Sophie19 (Post 1510009)
The property owner where I keep my horse is having hay cut tomorrow. I have read that you need to let the bales sit for a while before you store them to let them dry out. How long do they need to sit?

Also it is a very big pasture. It's probably about 40 acres. I don't own a truck, but am planning to rent one to bring in the hay. Is this to big of a job for just me and my husband to conquer by ourselves?

2 things we need to know in this situation. One is the hay going to be square baled or round? 2. Has the hay been properly dried after cutting?(as in set in a dry field after being cut for about a week?)

mammakatja 05-21-2012 04:05 PM

Wallee is right. It is more important for the hay to dry out BEFORE it is baled. And it needs to be raked and turned at least once so it dries out well underneath too. Once it is baled, it may dry out a little more around the outside, but the inside of your bales will never get a chance to dry out properly once baled if they are still green. And then you run the risk of mold or hot bales. And the dry out time depends on the weather. Last year, we cut our field here in TX in the middle of July at 100 degrees and the grass was practically dry when it hit the ground. We cut Tuesday and baled Fri. My husband is out there cutting as I'm typing this now and we're going to let it dry for about a week this time just because the nights still cool off and get kind of dewy. So just make sure your hay is dried well before baling. Once it is baled, we go out there and collect immediately. Here in TX, especially after last year's drought, theft could be an issue (with square bales more so than round bales). Oh and as far as the size of the job, it depends. We baled 10 acres last year and got 320 square bales. Hubby and I did most of it ourselves and enlisted our kids when we could. It is definitely a workout though! ;) Who needs a gym anyway?!! ;)

PaintHorseMares 05-21-2012 04:25 PM

^^ Yes. Hay needs yo be properly cured before it is baled. Here, it is usually 3-4 days depending on the weather. Once it is cured, you don't have to wait before storing it.
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Wallee 05-21-2012 04:37 PM

A green bale is a fire waiting to happen! I have picked up some before and soon as I pull my tractor spike out the bale and a little smoking hay comes out with it. I sure am not putting it in my barn ha ha. Be careful to let the hay completely cure and dry before rolling!

Sophie19 05-21-2012 05:21 PM

They will be square bales. The property owner hired someone to bale them, so hopefully he will let it dry properly before baling. If he doesn't is it usable? I really only need about 200 bales for my horse. Maybe I could get someone to come help me haul it and pay them in hay.

PaintHorseMares 05-21-2012 05:43 PM

Check it carefully. If it's not cured enough not only can it catch fire, but it will also mold.
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Wallee 05-21-2012 11:08 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Sophie19 (Post 1510167)
They will be square bales. The property owner hired someone to bale them, so hopefully he will let it dry properly before baling. If he doesn't is it usable? I really only need about 200 bales for my horse. Maybe I could get someone to come help me haul it and pay them in hay.


I imagine whoever is bailing it will know what they are doing. And square bales arent hard to handle. I tell ya what find a few teens around and pay them a few bucks a hour and let them load while you drive and such. But if it was me I would just do it myself. you can handle square bales with a truck and trailer. I have threw bales on a trailer behind a tractor many a days.

BoldComic 05-31-2012 11:22 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Wallee (Post 1510737)
I imagine whoever is bailing it will know what they are doing. And square bales arent hard to handle. I tell ya what find a few teens around and pay them a few bucks a hour and let them load while you drive and such. But if it was me I would just do it myself. you can handle square bales with a truck and trailer. I have threw bales on a trailer behind a tractor many a days.

I agree. If the guy knows how to run a bailer then he'll most likely know what he's doing.

Hubby and I haul 300+ bales from field to barn every year. We usually get 2 others (teens, friends, family) to help us. One person drives the truck through the field, 2 throw bales on the trailer, one stacks. When we get to the barn everyone unloads. It actually goes pretty quick, you'll be surprised.

cowboy bowhunter 05-31-2012 11:22 AM

Ok hope this helps.
When you cut hay you want to let it dry down to 14-20%. To get them they have to let them sit in field and maybe even roll the hay before baling. Once the bales are made you can pick them up and put them in the barn. With a haybine and hot weather it may only take 2 days but could take a week to dry.

For picking it up off the field it would be best to have 3 people. 1 to drive the truck, 1 to throw the bales on the trailer and 1 to stack. Not saying that is what you have to have but with 40 acres your going to be working hard and want to have as many as possible to help and get down with it. And you will realize why SQ bales are called idiot blocks. haha.


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