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VACowgirl 06-05-2012 11:23 AM

First time reining
 
Hi y'all!
So I've been riding for a little over a year and have done barrels and Western pleasure. I wanted a challenge and also intend to have my own cattle ranch one day, so I decided to try my hand at reining. Today will be my first lesson.

Can you say...NERVOUS?!
What can I expect in reining? Are there pros and cons? Any good tips from experienced reiners out there? :)

Thanks so much!
Lindsey

Adam 06-06-2012 11:53 PM

So how was your first lesson? :)

shmurmer4 06-11-2012 12:44 AM

Sit up horsemanshipy unless you're running down to a stop, and use 95-99% leg. :-)

VACowgirl 06-13-2012 06:38 PM

Oh man, it was a BLAST!! I've had two lessons since I'd posted this topic. I've actually taken to reining pretty well. The only thing is, when I get into a sliding stop, I tend to fly forward. I really need to work on sitting deep in the saddle. Any suggestions? :)

Also, do you guys do any reining exercises where you're trotting posted? My instructor had me practice that and I'm sure I looked ridiculous. Just wondering why he'd make me do that...
:D

nrhareiner 06-14-2012 12:57 PM

Posting at the trot will help you learn to feel your horse and where you are in the movement of the horse. Which you will need to learn how to do a correct sliding stop or really anything.

Joidigm 06-19-2012 10:21 PM

I'd love to learn reining. I'm still looking for an instructor in my area!

Posting helps you find your OWN balance while the horse moves, without depending on the saddle. Standing in a two point while the horse walks and trots is another exercise that does the same. I have issues with falling forward too during downward transitions. All you can do is work on your core muscles, and work on a lot of up and down transitions.

You can also try riding bareback (or stirrupless), that gives you nothing to depend on to stay on except your own strength and balance. A western saddle is a lot of leather between you and the horse, and it happens without you noticing it - you start depending on the saddle to stay on. I do it in an english saddle, and I notice it, because when I started riding, my first instructor (an endurance rider) had me riding bareback from the get go. My second instructor (english and western rider) doesn't have me ride bareback any where near as much, and I feel the difference in my lack of balance without stirrups to catch myself with.


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