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Mjolnir 06-16-2012 12:23 AM

How to prevent cuts?
 
I have an Arabian gelding, 6 yo, he's a baby, not had much work on him before, and I'm starting to find nicks and cuts on his rear, interior posterns and cannons, and considering how he's still tripping over himself sometimes, I'm guessing it's from his hooves cutting him. Regular splint boots would protect his cannons from this, but the two nicks I found today are on the postern, right above the coronet, and I don't think regular splint boots would protect him from this. Does anyone have any ideas? Or am I wrong about splint boots protecting that area?

Thanks!

Skyseternalangel 06-16-2012 12:25 AM

Over reach boots.

But if he's nabbing himself with his own hooves, may need to look at his feet and see how they are being trimmed and discuss a way to fix them...

Do you know if they are from the hooves? May just be from being out and about. Horses are very accident and scratch prone.

Mjolnir 06-17-2012 12:07 AM

I need to get someone to watch me closely when I ride, but I'm pretty sure it's from his hooves. The hooves were just done last month, though, so it's nowhere near time for new shoes or even a trim. He obviously hasn't learned to be careful with his feet, he trips over himself fairly often, never badly, but I imagine that's at least sometimes when he's catching himself. And considering this is the only area he's got little cuts like this, I seriously doubt he's catching himself on something in his stall. I'll look into the boots. Thanks!

Skyseternalangel 06-17-2012 12:20 AM

Also when you ride him, walk over poles and do lots of figures. Get him being more mindful of his feet. My horse used to do the same thing.. the foot shuffle, kick his own feet, trip under saddle. Finally I made him do something that required him to think or fall and he chose to think.

Be careful, a horse without mind of his feet is quite dangerous in the scheme of things!

Best of luck though!!

smrobs 06-17-2012 12:33 AM

Do those scratches/cuts only show up after you've ridden him?

If so, then I would just suggest you invest in some form of boots (SMB or splint boots) and some over-reach boots as well. You can find them in pretty much any tack store/website.

If he does it constantly regardless of whether he's turned out or under saddle, I would first look at his hooves. An improperly balanced trim/shoeing job can screw a horse up royally in regards to how he moves. If that can be ruled out, then I would look next to his foot-awareness. What type of property did he grow up on; was it nice and flat and relatively obstacle free or were there steep hills, creek beds, and wood deadfalls that he had to navigate?

loosie 06-17-2012 03:05 AM

Well, first thing comes to mind for the subject is... http://4.bp.blogspot.com/_R_GJMjSz70...eepCostume.jpg :-P:lol:

But seriously, yes, agree that if he's that 'clumsy', it's very possibly a physical thing & is often caused by hoof problems. I'd want to get him checked out by a bodyworker - who if worth their salt should at least understand hoof balance well enough to tell you if it's a problem/factor.

Mjolnir 06-19-2012 12:10 AM

I've had his feet checked, and he's good. It's only happening when I'm riding. I'm thinking that my best bet is both medicine boots and bell boots. That's the only way I can cover the areas effected. Thanks for all your help!

loosie 06-19-2012 12:35 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Mjolnir (Post 1554800)
I've had his feet checked, and he's good. It's only happening when I'm riding. I'm thinking that my best bet is both medicine boots and bell boots. That's the only way I can cover the areas effected. Thanks for all your help!

So perhaps it's a body issue. Could be the way he uses himself & you're balanced when ridden. I'd use bell boots or such to protect him, and sometimes these things may never be resolved, so that sort of management is all you can do, but I'd personally keep trying to find & address the cause of the problem too.


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