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equinegirl26 07-09-2012 02:00 PM

Looking over jumps?
 
Hello !
I'm having a little problem with looking after jumps. My timing is totally off. What I mean is when i'm jumping when should I look to make sure my horse has landed on the correct lead? Not like look down at her shoulders, but look to the left or right. Do you get what I mean?

Thanks

Btw, I could do it before, but now I can't?

jaydee 07-09-2012 02:16 PM

looking on after a jump
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by equinegirl26 (Post 1588703)
Hello !
I'm having a little problem with looking after jumps. My timing is totally off. What I mean is when i'm jumping when should I look to make sure my horse has landed on the correct lead? Not like look down at her shoulders, but look to the left or right. Do you get what I mean?

Thanks

Btw, I could do it before, but now I can't?

Train yourself on the flat to be able to feel that your horse is on the right lead that way you can concentrate on looking where the next fence is and preparing for that while automatically correcting your horse if its wrong. Work at lots of direction changes at the canter then try it over fences

equinegirl26 07-09-2012 02:21 PM

I know how to feel the canter leads, but what i'm asking is, should I look at the next jump when i'm in the flight phase or when i'm taking off, approching?

jaydee 07-09-2012 03:44 PM

riding a jumping course
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by equinegirl26 (Post 1588741)
I know how to feel the canter leads, but what i'm asking is, should I look at the next jump when i'm in the flight phase or when i'm taking off, approching?

You should have walked the course first and already have a firm idea of how the layout is then try to watch a few others go round before you so you are really clear in your head You should know for example where fence 2 is before you set off to jump fence 1 and so it goes

pepsipop 07-09-2012 03:51 PM

I uaually teach kids on approach to look at base line then top rail about a stride off look for next fence. If you tend to be looking at rails on last stride you shift your weight foward and cause a knock on front. If you are looking at direction of next fence a stride off your body automatically shifts weight to land on correct lead. Dunno if this is what you looking for.
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equinegirl26 07-09-2012 09:56 PM

I got it down in my lesson today. :)

Thank you !

blue eyed pony 07-10-2012 12:31 PM

My horse refuses if you're looking AT your fence so close in Pepsipop... I only look at my fence to get onto my line and then I'll be looking past it at something straight ahead. Once we're in the air I'll be looking for my next fence.

We get VERY quick turns in jump-off and great times. I have won purely on my turns before now!

ETA; although it does help to set up your line for each fence according to the shortest line to the next, I always do that :) I jump most jumps on an angle when we're in the jump-off. Have had people comment, after my ride, that they were amazed my horse didn't run out, my line was so tight.

MyBoyPuck 07-10-2012 06:30 PM

Watch the fence until it disappears between your horse's ears, then look for your next fence while in the air. When you look at the next fence, it naturally brings your outside leg back and effectively cues your horse for the correct lead when he lands.

arrowattack09 07-10-2012 09:25 PM

When you are approaching a jump, you should not look at it. Instead, find something in the distance that is exactly in the middle of your jump (and up a bit) and look at that. Looking at the jump will cause you to change your position naturally as you anticipate the jump. Also, looking down at the jump even on the approach will increase the chance that your horse will refuse. When you land, your eyes go straight to the next jump.

ridding4life 07-11-2012 01:34 AM

As you are approaching around your corner look to you inside standard of a jump, this will help you with a straight approach. Focus on the center of the jump once you are on your line and commited. About a stride to two out, look into the distance and up. In the air and as you land, you should be looking for your next fence. By doing this it will help shift body weight to land on the correct lead, also if you put more weight in your outside sturrip that will help you land on the correct lead. I hope this helps


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