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newhorsemom 07-15-2012 07:49 PM

Any reason to shoe?
 
Our horse is barefoot and showing training level (schooling first). Her feet are healthy with no problems (she has some high/low issues on the front but not bad). I've had a couple of people say that I should think about shoeing in the future - the horse will need it "for extra support" as she advances in her training. I am just not clear what that means. My motto is "don't fix it if it isn't broken" and so far I don't see any reason to start shoeing a healthy barefoot hoof. Any ideas?

PaintHorseMares 07-15-2012 07:58 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by newhorsemom (Post 1599167)
My motto is "don't fix it if it isn't broken" and so far I don't see any reason to start shoeing a healthy barefoot hoof. Any ideas?

I agree totally. If your horse needs to be shod at some point in the future, so be it, but I would never do it unless there was some 'problem' that needed to be fixed.
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MyBoyPuck 07-15-2012 10:20 PM

I see no sense at all in the idea that you may have to shoe for support. If his feet are healthy and doing the job at hand, leave them alone. Especially in dressage where you are mostly working on very good footing, barefoot is a no brainer.

~*~anebel~*~ 07-15-2012 10:28 PM

When the horse is moving up and doing more and more training, yes she will need shoes to support the hooves. Especially with hi-lo you need to begin very carefully managing the feet at about third level. At the point where the horse is schooling hard in collection 5/6 days a week I think you will find some excess hoof wear and stress. Shoes, when applied correctly, also give support to the limbs and allow the horse to stay above the footing as well as supporting the hooves.
I ride, train and manage a high level Dressage horse with hi-lo and an integral part of my training is the shoeing. You can see my thread "Critique my farrier" to see what my horses shoe job is like.
While she might not need shoes now, long term in the medium and high levels she will need the support from shoes in order to train as consistently as is needed at these levels to do well, and do them correctly. A good farrier is your best resource.
Good luck!
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MyBoyPuck 07-15-2012 10:33 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by ~*~anebel~*~ (Post 1599387)
A good farrier is your best resource.
Good luck!
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Unfortunately that's the fly in the ointment. A farrier is easy to find. A good one, not so much. I have a friend who recently had a horse shod for the first time. It had 5 years of fantastic feet before it was shod. Two shoeings in, he hooves are already starting to run forward, heels are contracting and the horse's stride is noticeably shorter. If you do decide to shoe, look at tons of the farrier's work that you choose to use and go with one that does work similar to what Anabel's pics look like. He's really doing some nice work.

DancingArabian 07-15-2012 10:47 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by ~*~anebel~*~ (Post 1599387)
When the horse is moving up and doing more and more training, yes she will need shoes to support the hooves. Especially with hi-lo you need to begin very carefully managing the feet at about third level. At the point where the horse is schooling hard in collection 5/6 days a week I think you will find some excess hoof wear and stress. Shoes, when applied correctly, also give support to the limbs and allow the horse to stay above the footing as well as supporting the hooves.
I ride, train and manage a high level Dressage horse with hi-lo and an integral part of my training is the shoeing. You can see my thread "Critique my farrier" to see what my horses shoe job is like.
While she might not need shoes now, long term in the medium and high levels she will need the support from shoes in order to train as consistently as is needed at these levels to do well, and do them correctly. A good farrier is your best resource.
Good luck!
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What do you mean by hi-lo?
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MyBoyPuck 07-15-2012 10:49 PM

Flat foot/club foot. Very common and it is easier to keep under control with shoes.

~*~anebel~*~ 07-15-2012 10:49 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by DancingArabian (Post 1599414)
What do you mean by hi-lo?
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High-low hooves. One foot is high, one foot is low.
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MyBoyPuck 07-15-2012 10:56 PM

2 Attachment(s)
This is a high/low. That's two front feet. See how the heel on the left is lower and the whole foot is more forward? The heel on the right and the foot is more upright. Low one always wants to grow forward and high one always wants to grow heel.

azwantapaint 07-16-2012 12:56 AM

My horse was barefoot when I got her, but on the advice of my Farrier, a very talented one at that, and my intended job for her, she got her horsey nikes.
We keep every shoe from each shoeing, labeled and dated, to track her wear pasterns on each foot.
Right now, her right feet show a slightly toe out wear pattern, but w suspect that's me leaning to that side.
Turns out a quick trip to the chiropractor to tune me up, and straighten me back out, should do the trick.
Its rained all weekend, so no rides for us to test the theory yet.
I do recommend that you consult a Farrier as to thebenefits and drawbacks of shoeing, and make the decision that is nest for your horse.


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