The Horse Forum

The Horse Forum (/)
-   Horse Training (http://www.horseforum.com/horse-training/)
-   -   In over my head.. (http://www.horseforum.com/horse-training/over-my-head-130996/)

jingojewel 07-15-2012 08:27 PM

In over my head..
 
We recently gelded my mothers 8 year old stallion(gelding) and because of the time of year I have been hand walking him twice a day and he's being kept on antibiotics. The vet also advised me to lunge him once a day at a trot, so he wouldn't stiffen up in his hind end later. Now, he was started under saddle as a three year old, and handled extensively as a young horse due to an injury that also prevented him from being shown, but since then he has just been used for pasture breeding. I've run into the issue now of him having absolutely no respect what so ever, to the point of not paying the slightest bit of attention to me unless I snap on his chin chain. Not to stay he's hard to handle, he's very docile and quiet, I can lead him past mares without a problem. But he doesn't respect my space or care about anything I ask of him. I tried to round pen him today and couldn't get more than two minutes total trotting and maybe three walking.

Now, my question for all of you more experienced, older horse people (I'm 17 and used to working with young horses) is how would you approach training a horse like this? I'd like to be able to restart him under saddle, but I wouldn't feel comfortable working with him, knowing that his attention is always elsewhere. How do you teach a horse like this respect?
Posted via Mobile Device

loosie 07-15-2012 08:46 PM

Basically I'd treat him like any other horse that didn't know his 'manners' or how to lunge. For a start, if he hasn't been lunged for 5 years or more, I would think 2 circles at the trot, let alone 2 minutes is great! Reinforce what you do get & build gradually from there. Be utterly consistent about disallowing him into your space too.

xVannaIsLifex 07-16-2012 12:49 AM

If he doesn't respect you space (that makes me think that he's walking into you/ahead of you/etc.) then push him over when he pushes you. If he walk ahead or behind, bring him to where you are. Try working with him in an area where he can't see other horses so he doesn't get distracted. He hasn't been handled too much and doesn't respond like other horses you're used to. Just be patient and work consistently with him. He just does whatever because he's lazy and used to not doing work. I've dealt with horses like that and they work if really try to get the effort out of them.

Army wife 07-16-2012 01:20 AM

Chasing a horse around in a circle is really boring for horses. You might have better luck switching directions every circle or less. You pick up your energy and chase him, he'll hopefully start taking his hints from you, and start picking up his own energy. Just be consistent and confident in everything you do with him. Esp since he is a newly gelded stallion. Good luck!!

Skyseternalangel 07-16-2012 02:24 AM

How can he be a (gelding) and a stallion.. and be used for breeding simultaneously??

Quote:

Originally Posted by xVannaIsLifex (Post 1599581)
If he doesn't respect you space (that makes me think that he's walking into you/ahead of you/etc.) then push him over when he pushes you.

It doesn't quite work like that :lol: They're a bit heavy...

If he pushes you, he needs to be out of your space without kicking out via backing, sending him off, or moving him laterally.

Roperchick 07-16-2012 04:04 AM

haha sky i think she was saying he was a stud and now she refers to him as her moms gelding hence the (). and that he was used for pasture breeding n whatnot before they just gelded him.

i would just start him like any other young horse...hes basically a horny teenager in an adult body....just cuz his cajones are gone doesnt mean he still doesnt want to be all young and studly...treat him like you would the young horses you work with.

just be extra cautious because you ARE working with an older stockier horse that misses his cajones.

Skyseternalangel 07-16-2012 04:33 AM

Ah alright

usandpets 07-16-2012 04:35 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Army wife (Post 1599615)
Chasing a horse around in a circle is really boring for horses. You might have better luck switching directions every circle or less. You pick up your energy and chase him, he'll hopefully start taking his hints from you, and start picking up his own energy. Just be consistent and confident in everything you do with him. Esp since he is a newly gelded stallion. Good luck!!

You are correct with changing directions often. It not only keeps his attention but it is teaching him that you are in control of when and where he puts his feet, the main part of getting his respect.
Posted via Mobile Device


All times are GMT -4. The time now is 05:49 AM.

Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.5
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Search Engine Friendly URLs by vBSEO 3.6.0