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-   -   Horses are NEVER too old to ride (http://www.horseforum.com/horse-talk/horses-never-too-old-ride-132270/)

WesternBella 07-25-2012 07:40 PM

Horses are NEVER too old to ride
 
I came across this video; I'd love to hear your opinions.

Horses Are NEVER to Old To Ride - YouTube
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BarrelracingArabian 07-25-2012 07:56 PM

Eh i agree and disagree with her. I agree that there is no set age but i disagree that a retired horsr has no fun in its life horses are perfectly content to be out in a pasture doing nothing. Also retirement doesnt mean the horses are never used again sometimes it's just they havr to be retired from that particular activity to something more low key.
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Copperhead 07-25-2012 08:21 PM

We had an old carriage horse that was "retired". When we noticed he was going off his feed, we'd hook him up to the carriage and take him for a lap. Just one lap, with no one inside the carriage except for the driver. It made him feel useful and he'd be good for another 3 months.

Roperchick 07-25-2012 08:25 PM

both my mares (20 and 26) are "retired". but we take them out now and then when some youngin wants to ride a horse.
they arent bored and they dont hate life when they arent worked. they enjoy lazing in the sun and getting fat...and chasing my poor geldings around.

they enjoy getting saddled up every now and then or having me get on bareback to fool around...

but they definitely arent up to doing the really competitive stuff i do with my boys.

Copperhead 07-25-2012 08:28 PM

I'm sorry, I just watched the video and I almost died laughing.

What is she...11? Like, horses are never too old...like, we ride horses and we like, ride them, so they should be like...ridden.

She can talk to me when she gains 20 years more experience.

I don't think theres a certain expiration date on a horse, but if its 32 and you ride it for 15 minites and it takes it 4 days to recoperate, odds are, you shouldn't ride it again.

ETA: I realize this post might sound a bit snobbish. But I just can't see anyone really taking her seriously until she's got quite a few more years of horse under her belt. I doubt she's seen the full life cycle of a horse yet, let alone be able to weigh a heavy opinion on whether horses should be retired or not. A lot more goes into retirement other than the physical aspect of the horse.

trampis67 07-25-2012 08:36 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Copperhead (Post 1615387)
I'm sorry, I just watched the video and I almost died laughing.

What is she...11? Like, horses are never too old...like, we ride horses and we like, ride them, so they should be like...ridden.

She can talk to me when she gains 20 years more experience.

I don't think theres a certain expiration date on a horse, but if its 32 and you ride it for 15 minites and it takes it 4 days to recoperate, odds are, you shouldn't ride it again.

I agree. She can say those things now, wait till she's topping 40-50 and starts feeling the pains and strains of age. She will probably start seeing things a little different.

Wallaby 07-25-2012 08:58 PM

I didn't watch the video so can't precisely comment on that (I started watching it and, judgemental me, was kinda put off by how young she was coupled with her "perfect" showy makeup - if she was really that horsey, where's the dirt streak? :lol: but that's just me being unreasonably judgemental).

But, if the other posters are an indication of what the "meat" of her subject was, I think it REALLY, really, depends on the horse whether or not they should be retired.

For instance, my 27 year old Lacey girl recently went from about 50% blind to about 85% blind (with most of that remaining sight in just one eye). She's in pain on a near daily basis due to that (small daily doses of bute help so she does get a bit of bute everyday) so I figured that now might be a good time to start easing her out of hard work (45+minute rides, averaging 5+miles/ride, three days a week is her usual schedule), right?
Wrong.
With just one long ride a week (she's also ridden twice a week, very lightly, by two young girls that I give lessons to) the life just seemed to start seeping out of her and I had no clue what was wrong. Then 2-3 weeks ago I started easing her back into her normal schedule again. I missed riding and figured I might as well try to cheer her up.
And what do you know? My happy, sassy, old lady is back with a venegance. She's trotting/cantering around her feild, building muscle like crazy, and does not want to come home when we reach the end of our intended trail rides.

Apparently, she wants to be the blind old lady that could.
I ride her three times a week now, she's ridden lightly in two lesson a week, and I lunge her walk/trot on the other days. She's loving it. Apparently, 27 and nearly blind isn't old enough to not be ridden.


On the other hand, at the summer camp I worked at for the last 5 summers, there were numerous healthy older horses that wanted to be DONE. Those guys ranged in age from 17-25 and all they really wanted to do was sit out in somebody's pasture, have a little girl put flowers in their manes, and just live out the rest of their days quietly and happily.
However, we HAD to use them. I felt terrible doing it but we had no choice. They were obviously unhappy undersaddle - cinchy with no cause, totally ignored their riders, spent more time eating on trail rides than actually walking, basically every behavior that says "Let me be done NOW".
It was the saddest but those horses were definitly too old, mentally, to be being ridden.


And then, there's the horses that Copperhead mentioned, that take 3 days to recover from a 15 minute ride. Or the ones that any "forced" exercise makes weight fall off of, those guys are the ones that need to be done being ridden/worked.

I really think that sometimes people need spend less time making statements about horses and more time truly listeing to what the horse is saying.
If you looks closely and carefully, mostttt horses WILL take the time to tell you about how they feel about one thing or another. You, as the rider/owner, just have to take the time to see and understand the signals you're being given.

Tianimalz 07-25-2012 09:05 PM

Quote:

I really think that sometimes people need spend less time making statements about horses and more time truly listeing to what the horse is saying.
If you look closely and carefully, mostttt horses WILL take the time to tell you about how they feel about one thing or another. You, as the rider/owner, just have to take the time to see and understand the signals you're being given.
:clap: :clap: :clap: :clap: :clap: :clap:

Thank you, you said what I wanted too, but in a much better way.

rookie 07-25-2012 09:23 PM

I agree it depends on the horse. We have an old former race horse. He raced for 14 years and has been retired for 6. He rules his pasture. I tried to load him on the trailer to go to an event last year. He was very firm that he was RETIRED and did not see the point of getting in the trailer. He got in and went but he was clearly upset about the entire concept. Then again, I had a mare in her mid to late twenties who loved work and being fussed over. The oldest plod along mare until you set a jump in front of her. Then you could not hold her back or make her go around. Its all about the individual.

Roperchick 07-26-2012 12:07 AM

i think she should spend a little more time paying attention in school to stop saying like..and to learn how much make up it too much...and spend less time talking about horses when shes probably never spent an hour at once on one...js.


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