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-   -   How do I convince my parents about buying a horse? (http://www.horseforum.com/horse-talk/how-do-i-convince-my-parents-132479/)

NeonSnap 07-27-2012 11:32 AM

How do I convince my parents about buying a horse?
 
So, I'm sure that every horse lover has a dream.. to own a horse. I do too, and unfortunately my parents said no. Of course they did, because horses are expensive to take care of. The horse I want is for free, but if it ends up being that I don't like him, then there is another Thoroughbred gelding I fell in love with.
I understand the big work and effort into bringing a horse into the family and paying for board, feed, and vet/farrier bills.
I'm far too young to work and have a job, so please don't tell me to get a job and work as much as I can.
I'm trying to find very good ways to convince my parents within a year.
I would love to have a horse because it would be a wonderful experience and filled with joy.
It would teach me tons of responsibility also.
It's just my parents think I'm being ungrateful for what I have. They pay money for my riding lessons and I thank them every day for that and try to work as hard as I can when they ask me to do chores.
They say that I'm very ungrateful for wanting a horse.
I love my parents but need huge help on how to convince them or at least make them think about getting a horse.
I'm willing to work but the problem is is that I don't want to walk dogs or clean people's yards unless I know them, and I only know 4 houses where I live.

Thank you so much and I hope I can sometime soon get a horse! :-)

poppy1356 07-27-2012 11:35 AM

Continue with lessons until you can get a job. Then you can save money and get your own horse. If you keep asking they might take away your lessons.

Speed Racer 07-27-2012 11:47 AM

Let's see, you're not willing to work to help defray the cost of the horse, yet you think your parents should get you one and spend their money to give you a frivolous luxury item that will live at least 25 years? Unless of course, you don't like the one you get, then you'll dump it and get another. :?

Yeah, not thinking you understand the value of a dollar or have one clue about how being grateful or responsible works.

DancingArabian 07-27-2012 11:59 AM

It's really not fair to ask your parents to take on an even larger luxury expense the what they're already paying for your lessons. Horses are a luxury. Wanting one real bad doesn't entitle you to it. It doesn't help your case that you are not going to help with the costs at all AND will also have to be carted around. If you're not old enough to drive you probably will need to be supervised while you ride so your parents are going to have to spend a ton of money, drive you around AND sit and twiddle while you ride.

Besides knowing that horses cost "a lot" it doesn't sound like you really know what that means. Especially when starting from scratch, you need tack and supplies which pushes up your startup cost even more.

All you want to do is clean and walk dogs? If you were really willing to do it you don't have enough hours in the day to do it enough to pay for a horse and see it. Asking your parents to take on such a big burden is rather selfish when they're already indulging your passion in the way they can. Should they take on extra jobs to pay for YOUR hobby? What are you doing to earn a horse besides making puppy eyes and saying please?

Wait until you can afford a horse then get one.
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Paradise 07-27-2012 12:05 PM

If your parents have said no to getting you a horse, I don't think there's much advice that we, strangers from the internet, can offer to sway them.

I know you want a horse RIGHT now. But sometimes we don't just 'get' what we want in life.

Not that it really matters, but just how young are you? Are you absolutely sure there is NO possible way for you to work and save up a bit of money? Can you cut grass, babysit, do chores for different people in the neighbourhood? Even saving up pocket change can make a big difference. Though you can't get a 'real' job yet, I bet there are tons of ways you can earn a bit of cash. And by working and trying so hard, you'll be able to prove to your parents how responsible, dedicated and serious about this you are. Not only that, you'll be able to prove to YOURSELF that this is something you really want.

Your parents may never buy you a horse, that's just the way it is. If you really want one, you'll have to do it yourself and find a way. You won't get one tomorrow, it may not even be for a few years, but when you do finally have the money for one, don't you think it'll be that much more special? The horse will be the fruits of your labour; it won't just have been a gift from your parents because you 'wanted' it.

Speed Racer 07-27-2012 12:11 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Paradise (Post 1618204)
Your parents may never buy you a horse, that's just the way it is. If you really want one, you'll have to do it yourself and find a way. You won't get one tomorrow, it may not even be for a few years, but when you do finally have the money for one, don't you think it'll be that much more special? The horse will be the fruits of your labour; it won't just have been a gift from your parents because you 'wanted' it.

Agreed, Paradise.

This is how it worked for me, and it didn't kill me to wait to get a horse until I could afford everything myself. In fact, it gave me quite a good deal of satisfaction to finally achieve my goal after so many years without anyone elses help. :D

goneriding 07-27-2012 12:31 PM

If you were my kid and another nagging comment come out of your mouth about owning your own horse, lessons would immediately cease. You haven't a clue to the expenses involved with owning a horse. Have you considered that maybe your parents just cannot afford one? Have you ever given a thought that maybe they would like to have a retirement fund so they can enjoy their life's hard work doing what they love? They are giving you lessons which are not cheap. Be thankful they are even giving you that.

Jore 07-27-2012 12:32 PM

It took me seven years of consistent lessons, and three years of leasing experience to finally convince my dad. (my parents are divorced but my mom has agreed to continue with paying for board) What did I do?

1. I quit asking for a few years.
2. About three months ago, I realized that I wanted to buy Major.
3. I gave my dad a bunch of reasons while he was watching me in a lesson.
4. I made a fifteen slide power point with costs, benefits, supplies, etc.
5. I had a really long discussion about it.
6. I made a promise to keep my GPA above 88% this year, as well as to be nicer. (which is going good so far)
7. To pay my dad back the purchase price if I was to ever sell him.
8. To apply for part-time jobs once my current one ends (I'm a swim instructor/lifeguard)

And now? I'm going to be the official owner of Major on August 30. :)

Although, I do have horse friends who have yet to win the argument with their parents.. all I can say is that it'll be worth the wait.

rookie 07-27-2012 12:40 PM

If you want a horse you have to work for a horse. I don't mean cleaning up after dogs four houses in town. See if you can work at the barn you take lessons at. You should be taking lessons. Stop pestering your parents for a horse. No adult ever got (or should have received) a luxury item by nagging and whinning.

Also, free horse does not mean good horse. Sometimes free horse means crazy, half broke horse that we can't sell and we need to get rid of. I don't know that you can handle a thoroughbred based on your experience. I don't mean that in a mean way but you sound young and new to horses. A thoroughbred would not be the first choice unless that horse was exceptional.

wetrain17 07-27-2012 12:47 PM

What have you done to show your parents you deserve a horse?


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