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AmyL15 07-28-2012 05:36 PM

Issue and query.
 
PLEASE READ!!!!! HORSE ISSUE!!!

Ok so 1.) I want to go bit shopping, but because my horse is a riding school horse I am unable to take the bit with me as people will be using him. Do I measure the bit, if so in inches or centimetres? He finds it uncomfortable on his teeth as it clangs so I think he needs something softer on his mouth. At the moment he has a single jointed snaffle bit and I can't remember whether he has an eggbutt snaffle or loose ring. What does everyone think about getting the Flexi mouth in a snaffle form?

2.) I am also going stirrup shopping, some advice? Never been.

3.) My horse was taught how to walk back when I walk back and now he does it constantly in his stable and when I go to back him. I have been told to ignore it and yes this works but I usually have to follow him round in a complete circle before he stops. I can't hit him or punish him in anyway because he's not doing it out of naughtiness, he thinks he's doing right.

palominolover 07-28-2012 06:06 PM

When he backs up he IS doing it out of naughtiness, not because "he thinks it's right". You're going to NEED to punish him. If he wants to back up then let him back up, back him up out of the stall, back him into the arena, back him up into his stall etc... Back him up whenever it is a simple everyday routine exercise, he'll soon realize backing up isn't all that fun anymore :). Edit: Bits are measured in centimeters :).

AmyL15 07-28-2012 06:09 PM

Thank you very much, I will defiantly try that :)
I've hit him on the shoulder a couple of times but can't bear to do it to him, thanks.

tinyliny 07-28-2012 07:14 PM

Do you mean that when you try to walk back toward the saddle, such as when you want to make an adjustment, or to prepare to mount, the hrose backs away from you instead of standing still?

If so, I would move a bit more quickly and out and around, in a bit of an arc, toward his midsection. IF he tries to back, then go with him, with your hand up on the saddle. Move calmly, sothat you are only followin him, not adding any push to his movement. you can say "ho, ho" if you wish, stay calm and stay focussed in that you are asking him to stand off to your side, not back away from you. He will stp backing in a bit.
I would not punish but I would just stay with him ad let him know that he is just working harder for no good reason. Once he stops, you just say a simple "good boy" and go immediately right to the business you started out to do.

When you have clear intention in your mind and body that you approaching his side is to get near the saddle, VS to back him up, he will read your intention as clear as day.

AmyL15 07-28-2012 07:19 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by tinyliny (Post 1620018)
Do you mean that when you try to walk back toward the saddle, such as when you want to make an adjustment, or to prepare to mount, the hrose backs away from you instead of standing still?

If so, I would move a bit more quickly and out and around, in a bit of an arc, toward his midsection. IF he tries to back, then go with him, with your hand up on the saddle. Move calmly, sothat you are only followin him, not adding any push to his movement. you can say "ho, ho" if you wish, stay calm and stay focussed in that you are asking him to stand off to your side, not back away from you. He will stp backing in a bit.
I would not punish but I would just stay with him ad let him know that he is just working harder for no good reason. Once he stops, you just say a simple "good boy" and go immediately right to the business you started out to do.

When you have clear intention in your mind and body that you approaching his side is to get near the saddle, VS to back him up, he will read your intention as clear as day.

Thanks so much!! I do follow him round calmly holding onto the saddle. Defiantly do this tomorrow and let you know how it went.

Saskia 07-28-2012 11:32 PM

Bits seem to be measured in inches here... even though we're metric. So who knows.

Copperhead 07-29-2012 12:23 PM

Is he your horse or the schools horse? If he's the schools horse they might not like the idea of you trying to switch bits. They put him in his current bit for a reason.

I would check the bit placement in his mouth. If its too loose it will clack his teeth. If he still has his canines, those can interrupt the bit as well. If the clacking is due to his canines, a new bit won't solve the problem. Normally, a bit won't clack if it's fitted right and the canines are gone.

AmyL15 07-29-2012 02:08 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Copperhead (Post 1620851)
Is he your horse or the schools horse? If he's the schools horse they might not like the idea of you trying to switch bits. They put him in his current bit for a reason.

I would check the bit placement in his mouth. If its too loose it will clack his teeth. If he still has his canines, those can interrupt the bit as well. If the clacking is due to his canines, a new bit won't solve the problem. Normally, a bit won't clack if it's fitted right and the canines are gone.

Ah that will explain it! He still has his canines. Thank you for letting me know. He is mine but occasionally used in lessons :)

Palomine 07-29-2012 02:18 PM

Quit following him around, and tell him to stand still. Also good idea to teach a "stay" command, or words to that effect.

But by following him? You are teaching him to do this.

As for stirrups and bit? Measure bit from ring to ring where headstall attaches, and use that, and what type of stirrups? Do you ride English or Western? Depends on what you want basically.

And why is he used for lessons?

AmyL15 07-29-2012 02:25 PM

Haha, so many people have different opinions! Ok so, I ride English and I'm not too sure what types of stirrups I want, it may be the stirrup grips that need replacing.

He's a riding school horse, only ridden at least twice a week in lessons and the rest of the time I ride him. He certainly does not have the same personality as a riding school horse 'supposedly' has.


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