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Hoofprints on my heart 08-04-2012 04:08 PM

Crash course in WP
 
So I have lost a bet and have 2 do 2 wp Classes @ fair this year and I have no idea What you do in a WP class. Im and english rider and Ive done contesting quite a lot but never a plesure class. if you could answer these questions that would be great.
Where do you hold your hands?
What do You wear?
How should you hold your reins?

I basically need a whole course on how to ride in a pleasure class and how my horse should be turned out.
Thanks!!

equiniphile 08-04-2012 06:07 PM

Western Pleasure should show your horse moving relaxed and easily, giving the impression that you're having a pleasurable ride. You'll need a curb bit, draped reins to be held with one hand in front of the horn. Look up WP videos on YouTube to get a general idea of how the class is run. The judge will have you w/j/l both ways, and they might ask that you back, in a lineup or on the rail.

If you don't have a rail outfit, wear nice jeans and a pressed flannel shirt. Gloves, if worn, should be of a neutral tone. If you can't match your saddle blanket to your shirt, choose a neutral color like white, black, or tan.

Your horse's tail should be left natural or worn with a well-matched extension, and the mane, if pulled, should be banded.

You'll need a helmet for 4-H, so put your hair in a bun, braid, or straightened ponytail, so it's neat and out of the way.

Above all, make sure everything is CLEAN.

spurstop 08-04-2012 09:47 PM

Don't wear gloves, ever. Fastest way to make yourself stick out as a complete novice.

Where do you hold your hands?
I typically hold my rein hand just in front of my saddle horn. Elbow at my side.

What do You wear?
In your case, a solid, startched long-sleeve collared shirt will work fine. Dark jeans, long enough so that they stack, also starched. Boots, belt, hat or helmet.

How should you hold your reins?
If the horse is five or under, it's a junior horse and you'll use a snaffle. Bridge your reins. If the horse is six or older, it will be in a curb bit. The reins should run through the top of your fist, with your index fingers between the reins. The slack comes out of the bottom of your fist and off to the side of your horse.

Check your association rules.

equiniphile 08-04-2012 10:04 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by spurstop (Post 1630997)
Don't wear gloves, ever. Fastest way to make yourself stick out as a complete novice.

Really? Interesting. The 4-H kids here wear them for both WP and Horsemanship.

spurstop 08-04-2012 10:20 PM

I would venture that is exclusive to low level 4-H then.

I seriously don't think that I have ever seen anyone wear gloves in a pleasure or horsemanship class. That's been out of style for decades.

MariaLevi22 08-05-2012 10:22 PM

Okay, If its just 4h then wear A button down shirt (Must have sleaves) Jeans, and chaps over your jeans. Western Saddle, Western Saddle Pad, Western Bridle. You will also need to put your hair in a bun, braid, or pony tail, and obviously a helmet. The names of the gaits in WP is Walk, Jog, and Lope. Just slow down the walk from the english a bit, not too big of a deal, jog you want to collect up the trott and slow it down, and the lope you will want to collect your horse, maintain a low headset (although most dont) and stay fairly slow and consistant (again, most dont in 4-h lol)
Oh and sitting, you will want your writing hand (unless your ambidextrous, then use whatever hand you feel more comfortable with) and you will use that to hold both of the reins (since they are appart, unlike the english reins) and they will go onto that side of the saddle. Think of holding the reins with 3 fingers first, your thumb, pointer, and middle. Lets say you are right handed, where you will hold the reins will create a 'v' shape on the left side of the 'v' shape you will have your thumb holding it, in the middle of the 'v' you will have the pointer and on the right side of the 'v' you will have the rest of your fingers holding it starting with your middle finger. (hopefully that helped, Im terrible at typing directions out)
Now with the the hand that you will NOT be holding your reins, you will have your arm relaxed and right at your side, almost hanging down. You will want to wear some western boots, and western spurs if your horse needs it.

PaintedShanty 08-07-2012 11:33 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by MariaLevi22 (Post 1632293)
Okay, If its just 4h then wear A button down shirt (Must have sleaves) Jeans, and chaps over your jeans.

Careful with chaps though, many counties here in WA have started phasing them out completely due to the fact that they're against the State Fair rules. (WA 4H State Fair only has Eq. classes and chaps can hide a less than desirable leg/heel position, and it's easier to outright ban chaps than it is to say "Oh, you can't use them in X, Y, and Z classes, but they're fine in A and B")

jillybean19 08-07-2012 11:43 PM

Just my two cents - It seems that some details of each post conflict with others, and though there are many things that I agree with, there are other things that conflict with what I did in WP (and I did win quite a few ribbons in WP as a 4H-er). I'd say you need to check with someone in your area if possible, because I'm betting that a lot of the details are regional, like the gloves for instance. As for bit, in our area, you simply just use two hands for a snaffle and one for a curb (and DON'T touch your reins with the second hand in a curb or you'll be disqualified!), but there are really no other restrictions like age for that. Again, I think the different rules will be regional and depend on the venue, level, and participants that you compete with.

jillybean19 08-07-2012 11:53 PM

As for what I did personally, here's the basics:

Clothing: Jeans, cowboy boots, and a western shirt - may be button down or a "slinky" with sleeves (basically a very sparkly and glittery long-sleeve shirt - we always made ours). Helmet if required, hat if not (though I always ride in a helmet either way!) Chaps, spurs, bolo, hair net, gloves - all optional. I don't think anyone really cared either way, just what we wanted to wear and felt pretty in lol.

Posture - straight, long leg; hands low and in front of the saddle horn (if riding in a curb with one hand, the second goes on your thigh all relaxed)

Riding - relaxed, follow whatever instructions they give you (sometimes they have walk/trot classes as well as walk/trot/lope classes). It's like simon says, except on horses. Keep your space between the other horses, and find out if it's more acceptable/practical to pass or to do a small circle to keep the space between your horse and the next horse. Keep as minimal contact on the bit as possible - the "best" have absolutely no contact on the bit, but that'll likely be impossible if you're riding a horse that has been trained only to have contact on the bit.

I'd recommend watching a couple of you tube videos at the level you plan on competing to get a realistic idea of what they do. The expectations at an open show with professionally trained western-pleasure horses can be very different than the expectations in a 4-H show with the family horse that does both English and Western.

spurstop 08-10-2012 12:52 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by jillybean19 (Post 1635331)
As for what I did personally, here's the basics:

Clothing: Jeans, cowboy boots, and a western shirt - may be button down or a "slinky" with sleeves (basically a very sparkly and glittery long-sleeve shirt - we always made ours). Slinkies are out of style. Don't wear one. Helmet if required, hat if not (though I always ride in a helmet either way!) Chaps, spurs, bolo, Bolo ties haven't been seen since the early 90s. hair net, gloves Gloves are definitely out for the serious competitors. - all optional. I don't think anyone really cared either way, just what we wanted to wear and felt pretty in lol.

Posture - straight, long leg; You should have some bend in your knee. Horses today are trained to go off the leg moreso than in the past. If you have the long, straight, Barbie leg then you are not going to be able to ride correctly. hands low and in front of the saddle horn (if riding in a curb with one hand, the second goes on your thigh all relaxed) Your free arm either hangs straight down for the pleasure, or you hold it bent and as if you holding the reins for horsemanship.

Riding - relaxed, follow whatever instructions they give you (sometimes they have walk/trot classes as well as walk/trot/lope classes). It's like simon says, except on horses. Keep your space between the other horses, and find out if it's more acceptable/practical to pass or to do a small circle to keep the space between your horse and the next horse. Don't circle. You get in the way of other exhibitors and just scream to everyone that you can't control your horse and don't know what you are doing. Pass if necessary. Give the other horse enough room and don't cut anyone off. Keep as minimal contact on the bit as possible - the "best" have absolutely no contact on the bit, but that'll likely be impossible if you're riding a horse that has been trained only to have contact on the bit. Have as much or as little contact as your horse requires. If your horse needs a little contact, then go with that. Whatever will help your horse to have the best go.

I'd recommend watching a couple of you tube videos at the level you plan on competing to get a realistic idea of what they do. The expectations at an open show with professionally trained western-pleasure horses can be very different than the expectations in a 4-H show with the family horse that does both English and Western.

Mine is bold and italicized.


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