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23hejduk 08-06-2012 05:31 PM

Turning and leg cues
 
With my horse I have always squeezed with my left leg while turning left; right leg while turning right. I do this every time I turn, to the point that (if he's feeling nice haha) he will turn based on my leg cues without any reins movement. Is this even a correct way of doing things? :-)

I do the same when turning barrels

gothicangel69 08-06-2012 08:10 PM

Depends on how I want my horse to turn. He should move away from pressure, so if I want him to turn on his forehand, I use my left leg to turn right. If I want him to turn on his hind, I use my left leg behind the girth to turn left.
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nrhareiner 08-06-2012 08:18 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by gothicangel69 (Post 1633494)
Depends on how I want my horse to turn. He should move away from pressure, so if I want him to turn on his forehand, I use my left leg to turn right. If I want him to turn on his hind, I use my left leg behind the girth to turn left.
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Actually that would be backward. At least for what I do. If I want my horse to pivot on the front I push their hip over. So I use my right leg to push the him to the right to get them to pivot on their right front foot.

Now if I want my horse to turn on its rear like a reining stip I cue with my out side leg. So again I am PUSHING the horses shoulder over around it rear inside foot. So right leg push the horse left to pivot around its rear left foot.

tinyliny 08-06-2012 08:28 PM

I am guessing that the member above got mixed up when she said "turn on the forehand" . She probably meant "turn his forehand", whcih would be a turn on the haunches while the forehand goes around the haunches.
It's easy to get those two mixed up.

loosie 08-07-2012 02:44 AM

I too do as described above - my horses are trained to yield away from pressure. But dressage/english riders tend to do the opposite & put the 'inside' leg on for a turn. Don't quite get that(& a dressage trainer confused the hell out of my horse by doing that & then said I lied about him knowing leg aids...:evil:), but whatever floats your boat. If you're the only one riding your horse, I say it's fine & dandy to teach him whatever cues you feel like for particular maneuvers. Just do it consistently & don't mix it up.

usandpets 08-07-2012 06:20 AM

I could be wrong because I don't do dressage. My understanding of using the left leg to turn left is to have the horse bend around the leg.

I have a friend that I'm helping start his horse. We ride western and that's how he wants to cue his horse. I did explain that it is confusing for the horse but he still wants it done that way. For someone, like me, that uses the opposite legs to cue the horse to turn, it also makes it confusing and harder for the rider, unless you are used to it. If you are consistent with the cues you use, you can train the horse to turn with the leg on the same side. In a way the horse is still moving away from the pressure by bending its rib cage. It's just not the way I like the horse to turn.
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smrobs 08-07-2012 08:16 AM

Now, keep in mind that I don't ride english and most of what I know about it came from being on here, but I think the reason that english riders use a lot of inside leg in a turn is that they want the horse's hip to follow on the same arc as their front end in a turn. They want them to stay "straight" even when turning. It would be similar to asking a horse to turn around a tree or a barrel. Outside leg to keep them from moving in that direction and inside leg to get them to bend around whatever is there and keep their hips out.

On the other hand, western riders like me and NRHA will normally use outside leg only unless we are asking for them to swing their butt around and keep their front feet in the same spot. Western riders want their horses to stick their butt in the ground and kind of "sweep" their front end around like you would want them to do in front of a cow. I've honestly never seen an english horse that would turn like that.

nrhareiner 08-07-2012 10:10 AM

The dressage rider that I ride with explaned it like this. That they use their inside leg b/c they want to push their horse into the outside rein. Then the out side rein keeps then straight and the inside rein gives direction. Not sure I am quite explaning that quite correctly but that is the gist of what she was telling me.

At the end of the day I have found that a well trained horse is a well trained horse and although her horse has a lot different movement them mine I can still get them to do the same maneuvers correctly. All the machanices are there.


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