The Horse Forum

The Horse Forum (/)
-   Hoof Care (http://www.horseforum.com/hoof-care/)
-   -   The difference a farrier visit can make! (http://www.horseforum.com/hoof-care/difference-farrier-visit-can-make-137767/)

Jore 09-15-2012 08:51 PM

The difference a farrier visit can make!
 
Let's just say I'm a tad over the moon with how Indie's farrier visit went today, even though the farrier said she has thrush in all her feet (although the front ones aren't too bad). He recommended a product to us and once my mom picked it up, he showed me how to put it on.. and said there'll be a huge improvement once the thrush is cleared up. He also said it looked like she had a major abcess at one point and to just keep putting the hibitane on the scabby area.

Before we treated the thrush, he fixed the angle on her left front heel by three degrees (apparently there was a difference of five inches so he fixed it as much as he could without taking too much off her feet). There was a huge difference in how Indie stood once he fixed it, she used to keep that leg forward but within a few minutes, she was comfortably standing with her legs squared! :D

He also recommended that we switch her steel shoes to aluminum shoes because it'll create less impact on her joints when she moves because they're more lightweight. He said they'll spread out a bit from her weight but we'll just change them each visit.

So, according to him, once we get her feet all fixed up, she's going to go so much better! He also recommended an anti-inflammatory for her legs because there was a bit of heat in the left front, but he says it might've been from the added pressure on the tendons because of the uneven heel.

MyBoyPuck 09-15-2012 09:16 PM

Sounds like you may have stumbled across a good farrier. They are about as easy to find as it is to win Powerball. The standing square is a good sign. Let horsie take it easy for a few days to get used to his new balance.

Jore 09-15-2012 09:27 PM

I think I must have! I admit, I haven't given him as much credit in the past as I think he deserves. He said he used to work around racing Standardbreds a lot so he knew quite a bit about what works and what doesn't.. he recommended a gel that doesn't require bandaging for getting down the swelling, I forget what it's called but my mom put a note in her phone about it.

I'm pretty pleased with the results! And yepp, that's the plan for her! :-) I just put her back outside once I got her fly sheet back on and tomorrow she'll just be getting a bath and I might just take her down to the arena for groundwork to work on flexion.

aforred 09-15-2012 10:30 PM

That's good to hear.
Posted via Mobile Device

Cacowgirl 09-16-2012 09:40 AM

Getting a good farrier is a major feat-glad that he helped Indie so much.

loosie 09-17-2012 01:27 AM

Hi, yes, if you've found a good farrier, hang on to him & treat him well!!:D

As keeping hooves in good nick is even more to do with management, feeding, etc, not to mention there are different theories & approaches, I do suggest people educate themselves on the principles of hoof health & function & not just take the word of whatever expert they employ though.

So on that note, a few comments on what you wrote....

Quote:

Originally Posted by Jore (Post 1684818)
he fixed the angle on her left front heel by three degrees (apparently there was a difference of five inches so he fixed it as much as he could without taking too much off her feet). There was a huge difference in how Indie stood once he fixed it, she used to keep that leg forward but within a few minutes, she was comfortably standing with her legs squared! :D

I gather you mean 5 degrees, not 5 inches?!:wink: Horses are often uneven, often called 'club footed' when it's quite obvious. This can be due to innate conformation(none of use are perfectly symmetrical), so called 'contracted tendons', posture & grazing stance, injury, bad farriery, etc. Depending on the cause and longevity of the difference, it is often not a good move to 'fix' it & try to make feet match. If/when it is appropriate to change it, it should be done gradually & there's usually more to it than just trimming - eg. bodywork, protecting/supporting feet to allow better use, management changes if it's due to grazing stance, etc, etc.

Quote:

He also recommended that we switch her steel shoes to aluminum shoes because it'll create less impact on her joints when she moves because they're more lightweight.
Yes, the lighter the shoe the better IMO, but studies that have been done show little if any difference in concussion between different metals. It's unfortunately one of those effects that seem to be innate to peripherally loading hooves with metal. If you're concerned about joint injury, I'd suggest looking into hoof boots when protection is needed, rather than conventional rims.

Quote:

He also recommended an anti-inflammatory for her legs because there was a bit of heat in the left front,
Yes, may be a good move, especially when changing angles, so possibly straining joints. But I would want an equine vet's opinion before giving generally & remember also that anti-inflams have side effects too, particularly on the gut, particularly if given in more than the short term. I would suggest feeding a probiotic whenever drugs such as this are given.

Jore 09-18-2012 08:47 PM

He adjusted the angle because it was straining the tendons as she would keep the leg out forward and now that it's been fixed, she seems more stable on it so to speak.

And yes, the anti-inflammatory is a liniment so it doesn't have anything to do with the gut.. it's a gel that's rubbed onto the legs. She's on Recovery EQ though, as the vet had suggested. :-)

And her feet are improving super quickly now! Such a big difference since Saturday!
Posted via Mobile Device


All times are GMT -4. The time now is 03:03 AM.

Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.5
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Search Engine Friendly URLs by vBSEO 3.6.0