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-   -   How do you teach ground manners and respect? (http://www.horseforum.com/horse-training/how-do-you-teach-ground-manners-142416/)

MissColors 11-03-2012 11:45 PM

How do you teach ground manners and respect?
 
My gelding needs a tad bit of a tune up. How do you go about teaching ground manners and respect training?
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BB2 11-03-2012 11:52 PM

You need to get really acquainted with Clinton Anderson
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AnrewPL 11-03-2012 11:54 PM

There are a thousand different ways, from a thousand different people, some of whom will offer to sell you their method for thousands of dollars. And given the nature of forum threads I'd say you will get a thousand different and possibly conflicting/contradicting answers here too.
My advice would to, if you have a reasonable amount of experience to begin with, is to go and have a look at some YT videos of the big name horse/people trainers, Pat Parelli, Monty Roberts, Ray Hunt, Clinton Anderson, those types, watch what they do and see which one you get the most, which one you understand the easiest. Once you have done that go and buy that guy's books (you don’t need to spend the thousands on the package) and learn from that.
If you don’t think you have the experience to do it that way, find a trainer, or a friend who knows how to de it and get them to teach you.

Spotted 11-03-2012 11:57 PM

Demand it!

SorrelHorse 11-04-2012 12:10 AM

Clinton Anderson. Easy to understand and easy to find.

www.downunderhorsemanship.tv

MissColors 11-04-2012 12:17 AM

I work well with lunging my horse personally. Its more like training than fun work (if that makes any sense) for him. I can over come all obstacles just about. But I guess I was just looking for ways to switch it up a bit. Working under saddle is bliss to him. Working on the ground not so much. And getting him back from the lease that want bad, His ground manners aren't as great as I had worked on them to be before(she let him get away with everything, some of the stories were crazy).

I have had to demand it a couple of times for my own safety(like for him to come out and try to bite me out of no where when he was in a stall and no one else was around nor was he tied. ) Not looking for an instant cure all, I don't mind one bit working for it. Just open to suggestions.
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MissColors 11-04-2012 12:18 AM

I do like Clint Anderson and I have done the Parelli games handful of times and like those too.
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beau159 11-04-2012 12:27 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by MissColors (Post 1743450)
I work well with lunging my horse personally. Its more like training than fun work (if that makes any sense) for him. I can over come all obstacles just about. But I guess I was just looking for ways to switch it up a bit. Working under saddle is bliss to him. Working on the ground not so much. And getting him back from the lease that want bad, His ground manners aren't as great as I had worked on them to be before(she let him get away with everything, some of the stories were crazy).

I have had to demand it a couple of times for my own safety(like for him to come out and try to bite me out of no where when he was in a stall and no one else was around nor was he tied. ) Not looking for an instant cure all, I don't mind one bit working for it. Just open to suggestions.
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Hmmmm, him trying to bite you out of nowhere? This raises an eyebrow for me.

Do you let him lick you? Do you let him nuzzle into your personal space? Does he drag you around when you lead him? Does he shoulder into you or bump you with his body? Etc .....

You need to demand his respect all the time. Not just when he is clearly acting out. He's obviously fallen into bad habits from his leasee and you will have to be 100% perfect in correct his behavior all the time or else he is going to learn again that he can get away with it. No, this doesn't mean you need to yell at him, or yank on the rope, or things of that nature (although that certainly is called for in a biting incident). But the very instant he gets into "your bubble" without you asking, you need to move him out of it. And be completely consistent and dilligent when demanding perfect respect on the ground.

SorrelHorse 11-04-2012 12:41 AM

Also, is this horse sore or hurt potentially?

dixieray53 11-04-2012 06:39 AM

If you dont have much experience training i personally would look for a local trainer to teach you how to do the groundwork as I feel if you watch the videos it does not mean you are doing it right. We have a trainer assisting us and I feel she helps with little things that I could not learn from the video like learning to feel the yield, remembering to lower hand and not pressure horse etc. Horses are sensitive and if timing off or if horse has a blow up (happens alot when pushed) the trainer will make sure you are doing the right way and teach you safety by where you stand...takes just a second to be out of position and get kicked. After you have learned proper you will be the most effective and safe.

Tracy


Tracy


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