The Horse Forum

The Horse Forum (/)
-   Horse Training (http://www.horseforum.com/horse-training/)
-   -   Horse confused by differnt disiciplines (http://www.horseforum.com/horse-training/horse-confused-differnt-disiciplines-143791/)

lwphillips70 11-16-2012 05:40 PM

Horse confused by differnt disiciplines
 
My daughter's horse is trained in both English and Western. She is a better Western horse, but my daughter wants to show both. How do we keep her from getting confused?

AnalisaParalyzer 11-17-2012 10:18 AM

i do english and western with my annie, and i've found that the simplest way is to have completely different, but equal in effect bits for the different disciplines, and be sure to ride like that discipline calls for every time you use that bit. i use a Dring snaffle every time i ride english, i try to keep her in frame, and if i plan on doing english gaits/jumping bareback.

i use a simple shank snaffle when i want to do western, and i ride her low and long, keep her at a jog and a lope (as opposed to the english trot and canter). she knows when she gets the bridle on what kind of work we'll be doing that day.
it works for anne, it may work for your mare too. good luck :)

NBEventer 11-17-2012 05:22 PM

The horse shouldn't get confused. It is up to the rider to ride the way you need to ride for each discipline. As long as the rider is riding properly the horse should have no problem. Horses are smart creatures. They know what the different saddles mean :-)

Chiilaa 11-17-2012 06:18 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by AnalisaParalyzer (Post 1761573)
i use a simple shank snaffle when i want to do western

If it has shanks, it is no longer a snaffle...

AnalisaParalyzer 11-18-2012 08:24 AM

Google shank snaffle. Or I'll do it for you monday when I get back to my comp. Anyway, google it. The images that show up, that's what I use on my horse. So unless google is wrong, the style of jointed bit attached to the shanks, is still a snaffle. but thanks :)
Posted via Mobile Device

nvr2many 11-18-2012 08:40 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by AnalisaParalyzer (Post 1762684)
Google shank snaffle. Or I'll do it for you monday when I get back to my comp. Anyway, google it. The images that show up, that's what I use on my horse. So unless google is wrong, the style of jointed bit attached to the shanks, is still a snaffle. but thanks :)
Posted via Mobile Device

Not to be rude, but just because you read it in print or something comes out of someones mouth does not make it true. :lol:

gottatrot 11-18-2012 09:04 AM

If you look at the horse tack section about bits, you can learn about what makes a snaffle vs. a curb. Any bit with leverage is no longer a snaffle. A so-called "shank snaffle" is usually what they call a Tom Thumb. It is a curb bit with a jointed mouthpiece.

Radiowaves 11-18-2012 02:39 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by AnalisaParalyzer (Post 1762684)
Google shank snaffle. Or I'll do it for you monday when I get back to my comp. Anyway, google it. The images that show up, that's what I use on my horse. So unless google is wrong, the style of jointed bit attached to the shanks, is still a snaffle. but thanks :)
Posted via Mobile Device

Actually, It's either a leverage bit OR a snaffle. But it's not only stuff that google is finding that is in error, I see catalogs and such with it wrong too. A snaffle bit is, be definition, not a shank/leverage bit. Honestly. A broken mouthpiece is just a broken mouthpiece, not a snaffle.

I sure understand the confusion though... I see it wrong a lot of places.... My definition comes from trainers, not marketing/advertising.... :-)
Posted via Mobile Device

GotaDunQH 11-18-2012 04:43 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by AnalisaParalyzer (Post 1762684)
Google shank snaffle. Or I'll do it for you monday when I get back to my comp. Anyway, google it. The images that show up, that's what I use on my horse. So unless google is wrong, the style of jointed bit attached to the shanks, is still a snaffle. but thanks :)
Posted via Mobile Device

There are two types of bits and ONLY two types of bits.

Snaffle: a bit WITHOUT shanks
Curb bit: a bit WITH shanks and a curb strap or chain.

The moutpiece has NOTHING to do with whether it makes it a snaffle or curb bit. The absence or inclusion of shanks does.

Bit makers will call a jointed mouth bit with shanks a snaffle, but it simply isn't.

GotaDunQH 11-18-2012 04:46 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by gottatrot (Post 1762706)
If you look at the horse tack section about bits, you can learn about what makes a snaffle vs. a curb. Any bit with leverage is no longer a snaffle. A so-called "shank snaffle" is usually what they call a Tom Thumb. It is a curb bit with a jointed mouthpiece.

Just to clarify...a Tom Thumb is a jointed mouth shank bit with short ABSOULTELY straight shanks. There are plenty of jointed mouth shanks that are NOT Tom Thumbs.


All times are GMT -4. The time now is 07:32 AM.

Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.5
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Search Engine Friendly URLs by vBSEO 3.6.0