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brittabam 12-19-2012 02:26 PM

Slightly Bruised Fronts
 
Hi, my horse got shawed on Monday. The shoer texted me and told me that my horse seemed sensitive to nailing and had some slight bruising on the toe of both her fronts. I had him hoof test her because we recently moved to CO from CA and she has been on Isoxsuprine until the beginning of this month. He said she had little response to them.

I am now thinking of putting back on the Isox , any thoughts on what else I should do? She is sound, should I still ride her or give her time off? He didn't give me too much additional information.

If you need some information on my horse she almost 6 and an OTTB I have had her for a little over 2 years. I have been told she has thin hoof walls but her feet always look healthy and are well formed with little to no cracks.

Red Cedar Farm 12-19-2012 02:43 PM

I would say that if she's bruised to give her a week or so off and then see how she goes from there.
Was she shod previously and you were just having her shoes reset? Or was she barefoot and turned out or ridden on rocky ground that she's not used to? Does she forge when she walks?

brittabam 12-19-2012 02:54 PM

She was shod previously with shoes. However, I just changed shoers and this was the first time the new guy did her. She has really dark hooves so I cannot see the bruise.

She is stalled at night with shavings, and is turned out for a few hours daily on soft ground. The weather has been bad so I haven't been trail riding her. Instead I have been riding her in an arena with footing. We also jump once a week.

What does forge mean?

Red Cedar Farm 12-19-2012 03:55 PM

Forging is where the front feet don't get out of the way of the back feet fast enough while a horse is in motion. The back toes will hit the soles area of the front foot as it comes forward, and can clip the front foot up near the toe area.
If she had shoes on previously, it might not hurt to remove the shoes completely until the bruise and her hoof wall has had a chance to grow out some.
If the shoer, or previous shoer, was putting the shoe on then filing back the toe to fit the shoe, this could have led to the problem, and also the reason she has thin hoof walls in that area.
Before sticking her back on the isoxsuprine, you should probably have your vet take a look at her feet (unshod) and see what he/she recommends you do from there.

brittabam 12-19-2012 04:26 PM

She doesn't forge. I guess I will just call the vet then.

Red Cedar Farm 12-19-2012 04:40 PM

I just thought of something...you say she's stalled. Does she paw at or bang the door/walls with her front feet?

Trinity3205 12-19-2012 07:59 PM

Bruising at the toe is commonly caused by the sole being rasped too thin at the toe during trimming. Also, once you can see it, its no longer an event but past history as the injury is growing out. Doesnt mean it wont happen again tho.

brittabam 12-20-2012 10:15 AM

She does paw and bang about.

Cherie 12-20-2012 10:28 AM

The first thing I think of when I see a horse with toes bruised on both front feet is --- Is this horse landing toe first? If it is, the heels may be sore. The reason you can see a 'sound' horse is that both hurt equally. If this horse is indeed landing toe first, I would have a vet nerve block one foot. If this horse is bilaterally sore, it will trot lame on the opposite foot.

It is a slow 'break-over' rather than the landing that is often the problem. Rolling the toe (either barefoot or shod) and rasping the front of the toe back or setting the shoes back takes strain off of the deep flexor tendons and navicular area.


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