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-   -   How to help a cinchy horse? (http://www.horseforum.com/horse-riding/how-help-cinchy-horse-147358/)

AndreaOllendick 12-21-2012 03:35 PM

How to help a cinchy horse?
 
My paint mare is very cinchy. My farrier and horse trainer took a look at her to see what the problem was and thats what they came up with. She side steps away from me when i bring the saddle towards her. (We checked the fit of the tack and that all fits just fine) When i go to tighten the girth she starts to paw at the dirt (or now snow) and shakes her head. The horse trainer is not able to come out as often since there is now snow on the ground so i am trying to work with her myself. During the summer that we got her i went to put my left foot in the stirrup and when i went to swing my other leg over she side kicked me with her back leg and being a new horse owner, im not going to lie, it scared me. Also, when you go to put your foot in the stirrup she starts to walk away. Making it very hard for a beginner to be comfortable riding. When we bought her the owners assured us she would be a great beginners horse but now i am questioning it. Anything i can do to correct this problem? Any little info helps. Thanks!
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franknbeans 12-21-2012 03:45 PM

Sounds to me like you need some help to get her respect. She is taking advantage of you, which ANY horse will eventually.......you really need the help of a trainer so that you can make some progress. I am not sure what you did when she tried to kick you, but I sure hope you let her think she was going to DIE for a few seconds-otherwise she will likely do it again. They are like little kids in mst cases, and will take advantage when allowed to.

deserthorsewoman 12-21-2012 03:50 PM

100% agree with franknbeans.
What did your trainer do with her?

Saddlebag 12-21-2012 04:20 PM

She is doing what she can to intimidate you as she doesn't want to be ridden. Take her and lunge her for a few minutes each way then touch the saddle to her shoulder. If she moves away, set it down quickly and lunger her for a few more minutes. You may have to do this three or four times until she makes the connection. When she'll stand place the saddle on her back for a few minutes and remove it. Do this a few times then begin to cinch her up. Again if she shows any negative behavior quickly remove the saddle and repeat the lunging. When you cinch her do it snug then walk her a dozen steps then tighten it again. Take her for a walk then come back to where you were and unsaddle her and put her away. Don't groom her or ride her as this is her reward for better behaviour. Do this each time for the next few days and you'll likely find there won't be much need to lunge her. I don't think her kicking at you will be an issue any more. Horses get to quickly learn the routine so sometimes saddle her up, just groom her then unsaddle and put her away or take her for a long walk and allow her to graze a bit.

AndreaOllendick 12-21-2012 04:55 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Saddlebag (Post 1809595)
She is doing what she can to intimidate you as she doesn't want to be ridden. Take her and lunge her for a few minutes each way then touch the saddle to her shoulder. If she moves away, set it down quickly and lunger her for a few more minutes. You may have to do this three or four times until she makes the connection. When she'll stand place the saddle on her back for a few minutes and remove it. Do this a few times then begin to cinch her up. Again if she shows any negative behavior quickly remove the saddle and repeat the lunging. When you cinch her do it snug then walk her a dozen steps then tighten it again. Take her for a walk then come back to where you were and unsaddle her and put her away. Don't groom her or ride her as this is her reward for better behaviour. Do this each time for the next few days and you'll likely find there won't be much need to lunge her. I don't think her kicking at you will be an issue any more. Horses get to quickly learn the routine so sometimes saddle her up, just groom her then unsaddle and put her away or take her for a long walk and allow her to graze a bit.

Thank you! But when i got my horse she was not taught to lunge. Is it hard to teach her to do?
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DraftyAiresMum 12-21-2012 04:58 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by AndreaOllendick (Post 1809636)
Thank you! But when i got my horse she was not taught to lunge. Is it hard to teach her to do?
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Lunging is easy to teach. I taught my two-year-old who was basically unhandled in about one fifteen minute session. Look up videos by Clinton Anderson and definitely ask your trainer.
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AndreaOllendick 12-21-2012 05:07 PM

Thank you so much! Also how much are the lunge lines? Do you have to have a special one? Also, would lunging my halflinger be a good way to get him to loose weight? Sorry about all the questions lol.
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jaydee 12-21-2012 05:14 PM

My understanding of 'cinchy' is a horse that has a reaction to the girth being tightened and goes from hunching up, bunny hopping right up to a full blown broncing fit
What I'm seeing with your horse is one that associates the saddle with work and has discovered it can avoid work by sidestepping and kicking out
I think some time with an experienced trainer that wouldnt be phased by it would help a lot especially if you can work with them

Chevaux 12-21-2012 05:34 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by AndreaOllendick (Post 1809652)
Thank you so much! Also how much are the lunge lines? Do you have to have a special one? Also, would lunging my halflinger be a good way to get him to loose weight? Sorry about all the questions lol.
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Re cost of lunge lines: I think you might be looking at $20-25 for a line, depending on where you live and what's available there or what you are able to order on line. In a pinch, you should be able to use a rope with snap attached - if you're going that route, make sure you're wearing gloves (which you should regardless) and you keep the rope drapped in large loops in one hand to avoid getting caught in it.

Re lunging for weight loss: I personally don't feel this would be appropriate. I always feel the longer a horse is kept lunging, the greater the potential damage to its joints and the greater the boredom factor. When I lunge it's with a view to seeing where the horse has his head at before I ride or as a training exercise to get it used to new equipment.

AndreaOllendick 12-21-2012 05:34 PM

She also bucks when i am able to get on her and especially bucks when i put her at a trot.
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