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-   -   sickle hocks? (http://www.horseforum.com/horse-conformation-critique/sickle-hocks-149706/)

horsecrazygirl13 01-12-2013 03:20 PM

sickle hocks?
 
http://i1150.photobucket.com/albums/...ps3cc89c4c.jpg
http://i1150.photobucket.com/albums/...3/DSC02362.jpg
http://i1150.photobucket.com/albums/...3/DSC02363.jpg

smrobs 01-12-2013 03:33 PM

No, the appearance of the hocks being sickled is just because he's standing camped under. Actually, his hind legs are very, very posty.

A horse that is truly sickle hocked will show it when the points of their hocks are close to lined up vertically with the point of their buttocks.

This horse is sickle hocked.
http://bp0.blogger.com/_uT-i4wrm9Ec/...20/awfulqh.gif

horsecrazygirl13 01-12-2013 03:38 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by smrobs (Post 1841117)
No, the appearance of the hocks being sickled is just because he's standing camped under. Actually, his hind legs are very, very posty.

A horse that is truly sickle hocked will show it when the points of their hocks are close to lined up vertically with the point of their buttocks.

This horse is sickle hocked.
http://bp0.blogger.com/_uT-i4wrm9Ec/...20/awfulqh.gif

You dont know what a relief this is!:happydance:
Is posty a problem?

smrobs 01-12-2013 03:44 PM

It can be. When the leg is too straight, then there is no shock absorption and it causes a lot of concussion on the joints in that leg and can lead to soundness problems...not to mention being jarring and uncomfortable for the rider. In addition to that, horses that don't have proper angle in their legs will have a great deal of difficulty using their body properly and it is virtually impossible to get a decent level of collection and/or gait extension from them.

horsecrazygirl13 01-12-2013 03:47 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by smrobs (Post 1841146)
It can be. When the leg is too straight, then there is no shock absorption and it causes a lot of concussion on the joints in that leg and can lead to soundness problems...not to mention being jarring and uncomfortable for the rider. In addition to that, horses that don't have proper angle in their legs will have a great deal of difficulty using their body properly and it is virtually impossible to get a decent level of collection and/or gait extension from them.

Do you think he will have a problem?

smrobs 01-12-2013 03:57 PM

There is no way to tell what will be the final result of a particular fault on a particular horse because each horse will progress differently depending on what they are asked to do, how they are trained, and the individual horse's own body.

If you were looking to do mid to higher levels in some discipline, then I would say yes, you would likely end up with soundness issues simply due to the body stress that higher levels of competition require...but then again, he may be fine even to the highest levels, only time would tell.

All I can really do is say that certain faults tend to predispose a horse to certain conditions. For example, IME horses with small feet, upright pasterns, and straight shoulders are predisposed to having Navicular. That doesn't mean that every horse with those faults will end up with Navicular, but they are predisposed to it. So, given the same care and workload as a well conformed horse, the horse with faults is more likely to end up with it.

Best I can really suggest with your horse is to make sure and let him mature before you start him under saddle and condition him slowly and properly to the level you want him to be. It is possible that he may end up with some sort of soundness issue...but it is also possible that he will be healthy and completely sound for the rest of his life. All you can do is do like the rest of us, regardless of a horse's faults; treat him right, watch for discomfort, and enjoy him.

horsecrazygirl13 01-12-2013 04:00 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by smrobs (Post 1841170)
There is no way to tell what will be the final result of a particular fault on a particular horse because each horse will progress differently depending on what they are asked to do, how they are trained, and the individual horse's own body.

If you were looking to do mid to higher levels in some discipline, then I would say yes, you would likely end up with soundness issues simply due to the body stress that higher levels of competition require...but then again, he may be fine even to the highest levels, only time would tell.

All I can really do is say that certain faults tend to predispose a horse to certain conditions. For example, IME horses with small feet, upright pasterns, and straight shoulders are predisposed to having Navicular. That doesn't mean that every horse with those faults will end up with Navicular, but they are predisposed to it. So, given the same care and workload as a well conformed horse, the horse with faults is more likely to end up with it.

Best I can really suggest with your horse is to make sure and let him mature before you start him under saddle and condition him slowly and properly to the level you want him to be. It is possible that he may end up with some sort of soundness issue...but it is also possible that he will be healthy and completely sound for the rest of his life. All you can do is do like the rest of us, regardless of a horse's faults; treat him right, watch for discomfort, and enjoy him.

I'm not planning anything too stressfull. Just some trail riding and light barrel racing.

smrobs 01-12-2013 04:03 PM

He really shouldn't have a problem, but it's always good to be aware of "potential"s :wink:.

Faceman 01-12-2013 05:42 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by smrobs (Post 1841117)
No, the appearance of the hocks being sickled is just because he's standing camped under. Actually, his hind legs are very, very posty.

A horse that is truly sickle hocked will show it when the points of their hocks are close to lined up vertically with the point of their buttocks.

Correctamundo...

SaddleStrings 01-13-2013 05:42 AM

The poor sorrel horse in the photo illustrating the sickle hock problem, sure has a lot of flaws going against him. Even those low set hocks are terrible!

OP, your baby is stunning! I bet he's a real sweetheart! That face of his is just too cute!


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