The Horse Forum

The Horse Forum (/)
-   Horse Training (http://www.horseforum.com/horse-training/)
-   -   Broke horse having issues (http://www.horseforum.com/horse-training/broke-horse-having-issues-150409/)

paintgirl96 01-18-2013 08:45 PM

Broke horse having issues
 
I have a seven year old solid bred Paint I ain't had for too long. I got the vet out here the second day to make sure he was sound & healthy for riding, & he's up to date on his coggins & all his shots. When I tack him up, when I start to tighten the girth, he'll start kicking his hind leg. He's kicking as if there's a fly on his stomach & he's tryin to kick it off or somethin. Once you have it tightened he's perfectly fine & he rides great. I can rub him there, pinch him down there, pat him, etc with no kicking. How can I get him to quick kickin when I tighten the saddle up?

Thunderspark 01-18-2013 11:08 PM

My mare will move away from me when I first tighten the cinch on her sometimes......I think it's because I do it fast and it makes her uncomfortable. Maybe you might have some hair being pulled or pinching him.....

waresbear 01-18-2013 11:11 PM

Some are sensitive in the girth area and don't their hairs crossed. As long as he doesn't kick at you, ignore it, or you can discipline him when he lifts a foot in case he decides to kick outward, your call.

SRose 01-19-2013 12:33 AM

Something that you can try is to take him into an area where you wont get cross traffic (preferably a round pen), I hesitate to say the cross ties simply because you get a lot of people coming and going and you want an environment where you wont be disturbed too much. He may have never been trained to stand still and "accept" the cinching. First, you want to make sure that he has no sore muscles in that area or on his back, an equine massage therapist can take a look if you'd like, also make sure that your saddle fits him properly, something as little as that may make him apprehensive to the cinching. If you've ruled this out then just a word of warning, make sure to keep yourself at his should just in case he does end up cow kicking. The last thing you want is to end up in the cross fire even if he doesn't mean to nick you. Try first by using your arms to firmly hug his girth and mid section and release quickly, if he pins his ears or kicks out repeat this process until he stands. And please keep your head from dropping too low. If he stands well for this, get your saddle on his back and grab the girth, with no latigo, and quickly and firmly place it to your horses stomach and then let it go just as quickly. Do this over and over until you have no reaction. Increase the amount of time you hold the girth to his stomach after that and keep repeating again until he has no reaction again. Repeat this again with the same firmness and quick to increased time with the latigo but with it only running through the cinch once. Keep doing this again until he stands still for you. You may want to repeat this process each time you go to saddle him just to enforce the lesson. Hope this helps.

Thunderspark 01-19-2013 01:08 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by SRose (Post 1851113)
Something that you can try is to take him into an area where you wont get cross traffic (preferably a round pen), I hesitate to say the cross ties simply because you get a lot of people coming and going and you want an environment where you wont be disturbed too much. He may have never been trained to stand still and "accept" the cinching. First, you want to make sure that he has no sore muscles in that area or on his back, an equine massage therapist can take a look if you'd like, also make sure that your saddle fits him properly, something as little as that may make him apprehensive to the cinching. If you've ruled this out then just a word of warning, make sure to keep yourself at his should just in case he does end up cow kicking. The last thing you want is to end up in the cross fire even if he doesn't mean to nick you. Try first by using your arms to firmly hug his girth and mid section and release quickly, if he pins his ears or kicks out repeat this process until he stands. And please keep your head from dropping too low. If he stands well for this, get your saddle on his back and grab the girth, with no latigo, and quickly and firmly place it to your horses stomach and then let it go just as quickly. Do this over and over until you have no reaction. Increase the amount of time you hold the girth to his stomach after that and keep repeating again until he has no reaction again. Repeat this again with the same firmness and quick to increased time with the latigo but with it only running through the cinch once. Keep doing this again until he stands still for you. You may want to repeat this process each time you go to saddle him just to enforce the lesson. Hope this helps.

I don't think I would use your arms to do that but take a lead rope and throw it over the back where the cinch would go, then reach and get the end of the lead like you would the cinch.....pull/release like a cinch is being tightened, I would do it till he stops kicking at his belly and then rub him with the lead, repeat doing that until you get the desired results of no kicking the belly when you pull it up.....

paintgirl96 01-19-2013 01:14 AM

Thanks you guys! I'll try that tomorrow before I ride for a bit. I was just thinking if he was sore or something, he'd be acting up when he was being ridden, but once the saddle is on he's perfectly fine. He doesn't move his body at all, just throws that back leg up. & thankfully, it's normally the one away from me.

Peppy Barrel Racing 01-19-2013 01:21 AM

Perhaps try tightening the cinch in stages. Like tighten it loosely but where it's agains the skin, then walk him around by leading. Then tighten it some more then walk again. Then if the horse is being calm and relaxed tighten again and ride. When you tighten and there is no cow kicking give lots of praise. This helped a mare if mine to quit being cinchy and be calm. Also make sure you stay in a place where you can't be kicked be safe!
Posted via Mobile Device

justashowmom 01-21-2013 07:31 PM

I second the tightening in stages. Can't tell you how many times I have seen horse flinch, pin ears and make faces, or try to kick because the rider tightens the girth all in one go. I ride English, and even for my horse, who, I don't think, is girthy, I start out with two up on the off side, one on the near. Then one on the off and one on the near. Just before we head for the ring to mount, I do up the off side to 4. At the mounting block, the near is put up to 3 and we are finished.

Palomine 01-22-2013 03:47 PM

Does his sheath need cleaning? Are you tenting the blanket under the gullet?

Are you placing saddle too far forwards, or is the cinch too long or too short for him?

You may also be pulling too tight too fast.

And might try running your hands all around slowly in girth area feeling for something there, abscess or even a thorn imbedded.

paintgirl96 01-22-2013 09:57 PM

I've felt under him. He lets me pat, rub, pinch all over his stomach & cinch area. He is a small framed horse, but the cinch is a 30" & my Appendix mare is about the same size as him so it fits them the same pretty much. I don't tighten fast at all actually. I normally always tighten it, give them about 3 minutes, then tighten it again because I'm used to my other Paint gelding bloating.


All times are GMT -4. The time now is 01:34 PM.

Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.5
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Search Engine Friendly URLs by vBSEO 3.6.0