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mistysms 02-21-2013 10:47 PM

Questions about riding?
 
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I have a 7 year old horse named Krissy. I bought her from a trail riding company that was going out of business. We are working on a few things. First of course is going out riding alone. She was never the lead horse on the trails and never went out with just her. So thats taking some time to get her used to. (its going really slow tho) Second thing is it seems like she doesn't understand how to turn when in saddle. I pull the rein to the right or left and some times she just starts to back up. I'm kind of lost what to do when she just starts to just back up. I understand maybe she doesn't get what i'm asking. But i think our main problem is walking forward. I can get her to walk forward (sometimes , other times she walks backward) but I get her to walk forward but she walks forward for maybe 5-10 steps then stops like ok was that enough? My trainer has me carry a crop whip just to tap her on the butt if she doesn't listen to my legs when i want her to move forward. When i'm not in the saddle she will let me lead her everywhere (even away from the other horse) I know she has trust in me (at least when I'm leading her she does) I have had a vet out to look at her teeth because I was worried that she drops some much grain but her teeth are fine just a messy eater. Oh also I have check her tack to make sure it all fits right and it does.
I guess my questions are...
1. Any tips on getting my horse used to riding alone?
2. Why does she keep backing up? and what to do when she does?
3. Is she not understanding what I want her to do?
4. Why does she stop every few steps?
5. Could all of these problems be because she doesn't like or not used to being rode alone?

Any tips or tricks will be helpful. I do have a trainer who is working with me and my horse but I would like to know other thoughts. Thank you! I added a few pictures of her.

smrobs 02-21-2013 10:54 PM

She's a real cutie! Unfortunately, most trail company horses that are not lead horses don't receive any training that goes beyond "follow the tail in front of you". So, even if she ever had any decent training (which she may not have), it hasn't been used in a long time.

If it was me, I would start with her just as if she had never been ridden before. Put her in a snaffle and work on lateral flexion and softness from the ground, then move up to doing that under saddle. The good news is, even if you treat her like a very green horse, she doesn't seem the type to buck or cause shenanigans.

Deschutes 02-21-2013 10:55 PM

Try some ground work exercises. She may just not trust your abilities as a leader and therefore refuses to go forward.
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Phly 02-21-2013 10:58 PM

My first thought. Is it possible that she's never been taught to RIDE? Think about it for a minute, what's a trail riding facility want? A horse that'll follow the lead horse and not go askew. I'd think so. So any Tom, dick, or Harry can saddle up and follow along. People are gonna bump legs, pull reigns, etc.... Just my first thought. I've been wrong before
Y'all type to fast, lol
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Deschutes 02-21-2013 11:01 PM

Psh! I'm on a phone. : p but then again, its a full keyboard so maybe that helps?
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mistysms 02-21-2013 11:22 PM

Oh when buying her I new we would have some problems because she was a trail horse. What makes it worse is she was the trail horse they put young children on haha. I guess your right and I need to start at the beginning. One problem we have with our other horse is our first trainer we had (i thought she was a joke) she stressed a lot on treating the horse to flex his neck. which don't get me wrong i guess thats a good thing. But now when we ride him and we go to turn and we pull on the rein he flexes his neck and puts his nose on our foot. He doesn't get we want him to turn not flex. So can you explain to me why its good to teach a horse to flex his neck? Starting from the beginning with Krissy shouldn't be to hard she is a fast learner. Just need to figure out what to start with. :)

boots 02-21-2013 11:25 PM

She sure is pretty. I agree with the start in a snaffle on basic direct reining and go from there.

And, I'm not above chousing one up if it really seem reluctant to move forward. They really don't hold it against me and seem to get the idea pretty quick. The "Man, when she says move, I'm gonna move" idea. You have to be going somewhere in order to have anthing to work on.

mistysms 02-21-2013 11:29 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by smrobs (Post 1906444)
She's a real cutie! Unfortunately, most trail company horses that are not lead horses don't receive any training that goes beyond "follow the tail in front of you". So, even if she ever had any decent training (which she may not have), it hasn't been used in a long time.

If it was me, I would start with her just as if she had never been ridden before. Put her in a snaffle and work on lateral flexion and softness from the ground, then move up to doing that under saddle. The good news is, even if you treat her like a very green horse, she doesn't seem the type to buck or cause shenanigans.

She would be the last horse that would kick, buck or anything like that. Well at least with me. Our old farrier was doing her feet for the first time since we got her and I wasn't watching but he said my horse kicked him and kicked her back. He is lucky I didn't walk up and kick him. That was the last time we used that farrier haha. I told our new farrier she might kick because our last farrier said she did and after he did her feet he said this horse has no kick in her. Which is very true. Other then when it comes to horses trying to steal her food. but even then she won't kick near me. I feel like she doesn't want to hurt me (crazy but i think that) She is my baby

Deschutes 02-21-2013 11:32 PM

You likely are giving him the cue to flex. "Open the barn door" so to speak if you really feel you need to be drastic with your cuing. Otherwise, leg pressure might aid in keeping forward motion.

Flexing helps to teach horses to give to pressure, rather than fight it, and it helps a lot with getting flexibility into their necks.

Ever tried doing circles to try and get a horse to bend around your leg? It becomes painful very quick when they don't. Have that flexibility you need.

But other practical uses are for one reign stops. If a horse won't give its head, you might as well be screwed.

But some people do tend to over flex, I agree.
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mistysms 02-21-2013 11:32 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by boots (Post 1906486)
She sure is pretty. I agree with the start in a snaffle on basic direct reining and go from there.

And, I'm not above chousing one up if it really seem reluctant to move forward. They really don't hold it against me and seem to get the idea pretty quick. The "Man, when she says move, I'm gonna move" idea. You have to be going somewhere in order to have anthing to work on.

Thats where we are having trouble learning how to turn, because you have to move forward to learn to turn.


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