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Breezy2011 03-08-2013 10:57 PM

Groundwork for gaining Respect
 
I was wondering if anyone could give me some ideas on how to gain my 2 year olds respect, what groundwork should I be doing, or could I be doing with her, and what should she know for a 2 year old. Is liberty a good thing to do to gain respect, or should I wait until she is older? I am looking for a list of things I could be doing with her to improve her trust and respect for me, to get her to listen better.

Thank you in advance for your help.

Laffeetaffee 03-09-2013 03:07 AM

All the usual little things, depending on what discipline you're training for.

Teach the horse not to walk in front of you, make sure there is a barrier at your shoulder that she doesn't cross. You can tell she knows it if you stop suddenly and if she keeps walking, then quickly corrects herself by moving back behind your shoulder. You can teach this by stopping, and if she walks past your shoulder, turn around and immediately walk back the other way. Let her get yanked against the lead rope if she has to. She needs to learn to pay attention, follow you, and not walk past you.

Teach the horse to move each part of her body without you even having to touch her. Moving a horse is about moving the mind, and the body follows. If you're pushing and shoving a horse everywhere, they will give up in body but their mind is completely resistant. You should be able to move their hindquarters, their shoulders, and move them backwards and forwards by gestures.

Desensitize. Not many people think this is necessary for leadership, but this is what lets the horse know that you are really in control of everything. You take a scary object like a plastic bag, put it on the end of a stick or whip, and begin leading the horse while smacking the bag on the ground. Let the horse run all over but always make sure the horse is walking towards the bag. When the horse begins to relax, stop and keep smacking the bag. If the horse backs up, walk forward again, then stop. If she backs up again, walk forward again and repeat. Eventually, she should either stay standing, or even take a few steps forward when you stop. When she does, immediately stop smacking the bag and pet her. Then begin smacking the bag on the ground again, moving her forward if she backs up. When she will stand still, show her the bag from a distance. As soon as she looks at the bag, take it away. Then show it to her again, and if she looks at it, take it away. Keep doing this until it looks like she's starting to relax and lose interest in the bag, then let her sniff the bag. From that point, you can begin slowly reaching the bag out to touch her, but anytime she tilts her head at the bag, take it away. This is teaching her that she only needs to look at the bag if she's nervous, and you will take it away for her every single time. This not only makes her less likely to blindly freak out at something scary, but also teaches her that you will handle any scary situation.

Breezy2011 03-09-2013 02:27 PM

Thanks, I actually have already done that, she will let me take the bag and touch her everywhere with it, tap her, rub it down her legs and on her face, etc. I was thinking about using a tarp now, and desensitizing to tractors (she is scared of them)

Breezy2011 03-10-2013 03:02 AM

I saddled Breeze for the first time today and she was great, I will put up a video sometime on youtube, but she had no buck or fight in her, the only thing she did was back up a little when I was putting it on her. When I lead her today with the saddle on, in her pen and out, she stayed behind me, stopped when I stopped and was just great today.

loosie 03-12-2013 10:35 PM

Can you tell us more about what you have done with her, what you plan for her, your experience training, so we can give you more specific advice? As for what you can teach a 2yo - everything you would an adult, aside from weightbearing & high impact stuff - for that I'd wait a couple or more years.

Breezy2011 03-12-2013 10:50 PM

-Lunging
-saddling
-tying
-backing up
-moving hindquarters
-desensitizing with ropes whips etc
-more things I cannot think of right now

Breeze does not lunge that great, she bucks and kicks and tries to cut into me a lot most of the time. She is pushy, but that is getting better, I have problems moving her forequarters easily. I just want to find a way to gain all her respect.

I have retrained another horse before, but this is my first horse, and 2 year old to work with. Breeze has a great whoa. She will stop as soon as a say it, no matter what we are doing.

I trained Breeze right from start. When I got her 6 months ago, she was a wild little thing, barely ever had people around her. I basically halter broke her, and taught her everything she knows. She also knows how to give kisses, but will only give a kiss if I ask, she has never given me one unless I asked.

Anything else you want to know, I will tell, I just cant think of anything else right now...

loosie 03-12-2013 11:24 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Breezy2011 (Post 1935422)
-Lunging
-saddling
-tying
-backing up
-moving hindquarters
-desensitizing with ropes whips etc
-more things I cannot think of right now

These are among the things you want to teach her? IOW starting from scratch basics? I suspect you're asking a bit much for a forum & suggest you really need hands on help of a good trainer.

Quote:

Breeze does not lunge that great, she bucks and kicks and tries to cut into me a lot most of the time. She is pushy, but that is getting better, I have problems moving her forequarters easily.
I use lunging to teach/reinforce the horse responding to me at a distance. So I teach it as an extension of all other yielding, just getting gradually further away. Therefore I wouldn't think about lunging until the horse was yielding all her parts, softly & reliably up close first.

Quote:

I basically halter broke her, and taught her everything she knows. She also knows how to give kisses,
So what does she know... aside from wearing a halter, kisses & whoa? What does she do well?

Breezy2011 03-12-2013 11:50 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by loosie (Post 1935485)
So what does she know... aside from wearing a halter, kisses & whoa? What does she do well?

She backs up nicely, yeilds her hindquarters, picks up feet and ties. She will stand and be patient when I am talking to someone, or just standing around. She follows me around, responds to pressure excellent, I can lead her in the open with just a rope around her neck, even down the road, she leads behind me most of the time in the pen, and beside me most of the time out of the pen (I am trying to teach to walk behind me, not beside me, unless I ask) She also respects my space, and if I walk away from her, then stop, she stays a certain distance from me, unless I allow her to come in.

The only problem with leading is she can get a little pushy at times. When I am doing something that Breeze wants to know about, she becomes pushy, like today I was putting the saddle on the fence, and Breeze was up in my space, so I backed her up, and made her stay a certain distance away from the saddle, until I allowed her to come and see it. She also doesn't like moving her forequarters, which is one thing I am working on.

While I am lunging her, I will lunge her long enough that she does eventually listen to me, and will eventually trot or walk calmly around with, without cutting into me, or freaking out. Also, I am trying to save up some money, because I am thinking about getting a profesional trainer to train ME to train Breeze. So I know what I am doing right and wrong, but until I can get enough money, it is just me, and the help of my parents, sometimes a friend who trains horses.

loosie 03-13-2013 12:17 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Breezy2011 (Post 1935536)
She backs up nicely, yeilds her hindquarters, picks up feet and ties.

Oh, so that list was what she can do - sorry!

Quote:

The only problem with leading is she can get a little pushy at times.
So be very consistent about that behaviour not working for her. Block her or otherwise get her out of your space every time she *starts* to crowd you. And don't forget to reward her for Right manners too.

Quote:

She also doesn't like moving her forequarters,
Doesn't like? What does she do? How are you asking? I'd get these sorts of basics down pat before you 'test' them at a distance, as in lunging.

Quote:

without cutting into me, or freaking out.
Definitely sounds like she's not up to lunging yet, IMO. Remember to keep safety in mind at all times too, and a reactive horse is potentially dangerous, as well as not in the frame of mind for learning. Therefore I'd be finding non-confrontational ways to teach her what you want without going too far & have her be reactive.

Breezy2011 03-13-2013 12:24 AM

Thank you, and as in moving the forequarters, she stands there, I will move her nose away and walk, and she will take one step, then try moving forward. BUT while lunging she will do it, the lunging is getting better and better each time I do it. She is a good horse, but she needs to learn to be respectful, which is why I am trying to get her respectful ASAP. She use to respect me, and had no problems, but in the last few months, it seems she has been testing me. I have contacted someone to come and see what I am doing wrong, or what I should be doing differently, but they haven't come yet, so I am going to contact them again.


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