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KylieHuitema 03-13-2013 08:38 AM

Strangles
 
So, my friends old horse had a case of strangles when it was younger, it pull through and fully recovered. But, she went from a sweet horse to an extremely dangerous one. She was sold to a parelli based trainer, where she went on to break the trainers shoulder 3 times. This horse was extremely aggressive and dangerous. My friend got the horse back, and sent it to an auction, basically for horses with no future. (Basically there were good potenntial owners mixed with kill trucks)

Is aggression common after strangles?

Muppetgirl 03-13-2013 09:00 AM

I've never heard of strangles causing aggression.....I have heard of Parelli trainers causing aggression though:rofl::rofl::rofl:
(Joking everyone!)

walkwavy 03-13-2013 09:21 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Muppetgirl (Post 1935762)
I've never heard of strangles causing aggression.....I have heard of Parelli trainers causing aggression though:rofl::rofl::rofl:
(Joking everyone!)

Not joking on the Parelli part.

Strangles is over rated. They get sick and most get well.

Muppetgirl 03-13-2013 09:24 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by walkwavy (Post 1935766)
Not joking on the Parelli part.

Strangles is over rated. They get sick and most get well.

I certainly don't think strangles is overrated....I've seen a couple of horses die from after nearly a whole barn had an outbreak. Yes, most get well, but some do die.

Copperhead 03-13-2013 09:41 AM

Strangles is nasty and gross but I've never heard of it changing a horse's attitude so badly. There could have been an underlying cause for the aggression.

I wanna comment on the parelli trainer but I won't because I'm feeling nice.

walkinthewalk 03-13-2013 10:19 AM

Ditto Strangles is to be taken very seriously, especially *******Strangles, and ditto that kind of behavioral change is something I've never heard of.

My Arab/Saddlebred was 27 when he went on his last organized ride --- and got a horrible horrible case of strangles.

It was found out later, the moron that let his horse drink straight from the big stock tank we were all supposed to bucket from, had the horse with strangles that spread it around. He should've kept the horse home and he REALLY should have had the snot knocked out of him for letting the horse drink from the big stock tank.

I was one of only a few that told him what an a** he was, and I wished I would've gotten in a smack-down with him because my horse and three others that I knew of, got sick.

The Strangles never traveled into Sonny's stomach but even the vet said he'd never seen a horse get that sick. I had to wear rubber gloves, bring him onto the road, break the sacks myself, thenn clean up what could into a plastic bag and throw clorox on the road. I was outdoor boarding, at the time, my horses were the only ones in the pasture but the vet did not want the lancing to be done in the pasture.

I had to lance the sacs as they were not wanting to break and the vet was worried the infection might travel to his stomach, where it could have been fatal.

The vet didn't see the need to come out and charge me for something he knew I could do, so he told me what to do over the phone and yes I was wearing rubber gloves.

I have changed a lot of diapers and I have cleaned up a lot of baby puke, but that was all a picnic compared to lancing those smelly-rotten-awful sacs under my horse's jowels and helping that stuff drain:cry:

While having Strangles never changed Sonny's "sunny" disposition, it did drag him down so much that he never fully recovered. I blame the strangles on exacerbating the cancer, which is why I had to lay him to rest two years later, when he was 29.

For the record, contrary to what I always believed, a horse does not get immunity from having Strangles. They can get it again but my understanding is, it won't be as severe:-|

Unless something else happened at the same time as the Strangles, I honestly don't have an answer, except that Strangles shouldn't change a horse's behavior pattern like what you're describing:?

Blue Smoke 03-13-2013 11:22 AM

I know one case of the recovery process from ******* strangles causing a horse to become irritated and annoyed to the point of aggression towards the owner. There is a huge difference in giving proper medical/supportive care and over doing it, this horse was poked, prodded, temp taken rectally every 30 minutes while she was there, owner would stay in his stall putting heat packs and rubbing the area for HOURS on end, think she actually caused the abscesses to migrate from all the rubbing she did to try and bring it to a head, they started out under the jaw, as normal, but he ended up abscessing up by his ear and about half way down his neck, that poor horse just wanted to be left alone. The other horses would get care, and checked on frequently, but were not pestered like this horse was, and he became aggressive towards his owner because of it.

jaydee 03-13-2013 11:34 AM

Strangles is pretty common in the UK and seems to run in cycles - dies down for a while and then returns. Its a small country so horses tend to be mostly close to each other and that allows for easy spread of things
It should never be taken lightly. A mare of ours got it when we had our horses on a big boarding/breeding/dealing yard when our youngest son was a baby (as it seemed like a good idea at the time). Of probably 60 horses kept there surprisingly only five actually caught the disease - it seems to attack young horses more than older ones. Of those five horses 3 died - our mare recovered very well though the other survivor was ill for longer and almost died at one point. They all received good care and vet attention
I cant see any reason why it should have affected the horses behaviour so dramatically and I would be looking at other reasons such as a brain tumour or Lymes Disease or anything else that is causing pain

Blue Smoke 03-13-2013 11:42 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by jaydee (Post 1935892)
I cant see any reason why it should have affected the horses behaviour so dramatically and I would be looking at other reasons such as a brain tumour or Lymes Disease or anything else that is causing pain

Exactly, but I would not rule out owner caused pain either, if the owner was pestering like the lady did in my post, it can easily cause aggression towards anyone coming in to treat it. There have been multiple cases of horses needing to be put down because the trauma of treating wounds caused irreversible behavioral changes, the horse associated people with extreme pain, and became aggressive towards them, or actually hurt someone.

jaydee 03-13-2013 12:11 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Blue Smoke (Post 1935907)
Exactly, but I would not rule out owner caused pain either, if the owner was pestering like the lady did in my post, it can easily cause aggression towards anyone coming in to treat it. There have been multiple cases of horses needing to be put down because the trauma of treating wounds caused irreversible behavioral changes, the horse associated people with extreme pain, and became aggressive towards them, or actually hurt someone.

I've had horses that have had some pretty awful injuries that I've had to 'hurt' them to treat but they've forgiven me for it. We did have an OTTB on the boarding yard that I managed that had been 'tendon fired' and he could smell a vet from a mile away and would go into attack mode the moment they set foot in his stable so he had to be orally sedated prior to any visits but the rest of the time he was a real sweetheart and never bothered about his owner or any of us attending to minor 'ouchies'
Maybe the secret is to always reward the horse after its been treated so it remembers that rather than the pain/discomfort
No help in this case but if this horse is like this for no reason then its probably not going to be safe to have around if it cant be convinced that people arent the enemy
I've had horses that have become defensive from abuse and even they can be turned around with time and patience but they arent for everybody as they always need careful handling


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