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OpheliasWings 04-20-2007 12:41 AM

Update on Morgan, need some training help, pls!
 
Hi everyone, I just wanted to drop by and give everyone and update on Morgan my qh x ,now gelding! We got him vaccinated and gelded on monday. He did pretty well over all, though at first he gave the vet and his assistant a bit of a run around with getting him sedated. The vet said he thinks we're going to have our hands full with him and that he thinks that he's part throughbred. So I have a few questions regarding a few issues that I've run into with him and I wanted to see if anyone could help.

We've had Morgan and Little Miss, our now 8 month old qh filly since early January. When we first got them Little Miss was a weanling with no training and Morgan was around 9 months old and doing great, he had been started on the Clinton Anderson methods and wad just a great horse. Our schedules got extremely busy with my husbands job and us only having one car so we weren't able to spend nearly enough time with them. During that time Morgan began to get really studdy and out of control. He couldn't be haltered, led, or handled much. He was fighting and chasing both the fillys on the property and just becoming a pain in the rear. I started going out I guess a month ago now with my husbands aunt every day and working on grooming him and trying to work with him a little. He's come around a bit, but he's extremely head shy and I can't seem to figure out what has caused him to be that way. You can barely touch his face, he either pushes your hand away, or avoids you totally by pulling back or side to side so that you won't touch his face or head. He's fine with me petting and grooming from his neck back. I work with him in the mornings by grooming him while he eats and he seems to do ok with that.

I don't know if I mentioned it the other week, but both him and our filly had pulled off their turn out halters and I was finally able to get them haltered, but prior to me getting them haltered we closed him in the stall and tried to halter him and he jumped a roughly 5 foot gate. So he doesn't like being inclosed or having someone approach him without an escape route, which I know is probably horses in general, but I'm beginning to wonder if that will pose a problem with round pen work later on.

My husband thinks he'll come around, which I'm hoping for, but I'm trying to figure out what I should be doing to help him stop being so head shy and to make him want to bond and be a more friendly horse. Also I forgot to mention the Saturday before his gelding he came up behind me and bit me in the back! If I hadn't of been wearing a thick pull over he probably would have bruised me pretty good. But I was shocked because it was completely unprovoked. So regardless, with my limited time to spend with the two of them I feel like I've been spending more time with him due to his attitude issues and what not and I haven't been spending an equal amount of time with the filly. Our filly, Little Miss is what I call her, is much more approachable. She's very curious, you can handle her face and head, she needs some lessons on leading and tying, but she picks up on stuff much quicker and just seems to want to spend more time with you. So I can see that if I were to take more time with her that she would far surpass our gelding. I feel like a bad mother choosing one of the other in regards to their abilities. So I don't want one to suffer due to not spending enough time with it or to give up on the other because they're not moving along as well as the other. I hope that makes sense. So right now I'm just looking for some advice on how to help our gelding become a better horsey citizen if possible. I've decided that I'd like to give him enough time to allow the hormones to get out of his system from the gelding and see how it affects his personality. If he continues to be hard to handle and it doesn't make enough difference to be able to work with him safely I may sell him and just keep our filly. I hate to think about making that decision, but considering I have no prior training experience and I'm relying on advice from others and my Clinton Anderson dvds, which I have yet to be able to put into practice fully. So sorry for the long ramble, but I'd like to hear from everyone and get some solid advice on the matter.

Thanks so much!

Take Care,

Sonseria

Desert Rat 04-23-2007 12:24 PM

Haveing him gellded should fix about half your problem.If he were mine or one I took in for training the next step would be total isolation from any other animal or human. This means not even being able to see one. Then he would eat only what I gave him and if he didn't come to me he would get a little hungry. It don't take long for them to come around like this. You could also let him drag a 20' rope in a corral or round pen so you don't have to chase him. This is a system recomended when working new mustangs.. They must also learn what restraint is about. Start working him slow off of the long rope to gain his trust. He sounds like he just hasn't had that much interactions with humans.

tumai 04-24-2007 03:40 AM

:) Hi there, If he were mine he would have been turned out with a paticularly grumpy aunty (mare) and left in a sense, to drain away that testosterone. All of the behaviour you have descibed is typical coltish behaviour and you are lucky he only bit and didn't try to mount you :shock: Probably a little too much handling for my liking but I don't know your training methods. Turn out time with an Aunty Grumpy would benefit because 1 you can devote that time to the filly 2 he can get rid of the coltyness (in my opinion takes about a year!) 3 Aunty Grumpy can teach him about being a civilised horse and growl and perhaps some times kick when that antisocial behaviour appears and she will teach him more than you could dream to in a year....Horses have a social order too and that sort of behaviour will not be tolerated by an aunty especially not from a jumped up so and so! Your husband is right he will come ok but if I were you I would assess your handling of him. This is just my opinion and am not trying to make you feel bad. Yes I do break in my own horses. Have a look at Andrew McClean and Lucy Rees.

tumai 04-24-2007 03:47 AM

:) Hi there, If he were mine he would have been turned out with a paticularly grumpy aunty (mare) and left in a sense, to drain away that testosterone. All of the behaviour you have descibed is typical coltish behaviour and you are lucky he only bit and didn't try to mount you :shock: Probably a little too much handling for my liking but I don't know your training methods. Turn out time with an Aunty Grumpy would benefit because 1 you can devote that time to the filly 2 he can get rid of the coltyness (in my opinion takes about a year!) 3 Aunty Grumpy can teach him about being a civilised horse and growl and perhaps some times kick when that antisocial behaviour appears and she will teach him more than you could dream to in a year....Horses have a social order too and that sort of behaviour will not be tolerated by an aunty especially not from a jumped up so and so! Your husband is right he will come ok but if I were you I would assess your handling of him. This is just my opinion and am not trying to make you feel bad. Yes I do break in my own horses.

tumai 04-24-2007 05:12 AM

oops! :oops: could one of the mods delete my last two posts here?


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