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-   -   Stallion to Gelding (http://www.horseforum.com/stallions-broodmares/stallion-gelding-159402/)

GoGoJoeGranny 03-21-2013 09:42 PM

Stallion to Gelding
 
Just wondering, do they go thru like "depression"? You can search my threads for more detail, but I had this happy-go-lucky mini, acted like a dog, total lover, just got him gelded last Monday, now, he's sad? He doesn't come when we call him (always did if he wasn't already right there), doesn't seem to enjoy our physical contact, barely finishes an apple. I have checked his temp, it's normal, I have inspected the incision site, it's healing as it should be. He's not having a health issue, but a mind issue. Is this normal? If so, do they get out of it?
Again, our 6 year old "adopted" stallion was just like a pet, now he seems to be a really sad horse. I offered him to come in tonight (my daughter has brought him "in" a billion times), he looked at me like Nope, I'm fine and cold right here. No more "kisses", no more head "hugs", is he sad? Or is this the "new" horse we have b/c we made a choice to geld?

SunnyDraco 03-21-2013 10:42 PM

He is still healing, it could be sore and tender to move. My sister gelded her yearling colt last week on Monday as well. He moved fine at first, a little sore and a couple days ago got a bit lethargic in his regular walk exercise she does with him. Today he was better than yesterday but still a bit sore. It takes time for the healing process and for them to feel good running around again.

rookie 03-22-2013 10:15 PM

Is a healing process he might be sore. He also might be smart and holding a grudge. He does not come running up to you because last time he ran up to you eagerly he got gelded which in his mind is not a "oh I lost my wonderful testicles" but "ouch I am sore and you caused me physical discomfort".

I don't think they are depressed about not being stallions anymore. I don't think a horse takes a whole lot of pride in his "horsehood". In addition, biochemically it takes 6-8 weeks for their testosterone levels to change. As far as hormones are concerned he is still a stud and will be for a few more weeks. In fact, some recently gelded horses will still have viable sperm in the farther reaches of their reproductive tract and can actually get a mare pregnant in the first few days after gelding. Which is why its advised to keep them away from mares for a few days/weeks after gelding.

Celeste 03-23-2013 11:45 AM

If he does not return to normal pretty soon, I think that you should call your veterinarian and get the horse checked out just to be sure that there is not something else wrong with him. Your horse does not know or care that he got "fixed". He just knows that he is not feeling well.

Palomine 03-23-2013 09:07 PM

I would say there is infection inside the operation site and it just has not shown up yet.

It may take a week for there to be enough that you will see it oozing out, but it is there I'll bet.

palogal 03-26-2013 10:28 PM

As everyone else said, he's probably sore. I'd give your vet a call and see if he things he needs to be on some antibiotics or something if you're concerned about infection.

palogal 03-26-2013 10:29 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by rookie (Post 1998233)
Is a healing process he might be sore. He also might be smart and holding a grudge. He does not come running up to you because last time he ran up to you eagerly he got gelded which in his mind is not a "oh I lost my wonderful testicles" but "ouch I am sore and you caused me physical discomfort".

I don't think they are depressed about not being stallions anymore. I don't think a horse takes a whole lot of pride in his "horsehood". In addition, biochemically it takes 6-8 weeks for their testosterone levels to change. As far as hormones are concerned he is still a stud and will be for a few more weeks. In fact, some recently gelded horses will still have viable sperm in the farther reaches of their reproductive tract and can actually get a mare pregnant in the first few days after gelding. Which is why its advised to keep them away from mares for a few days/weeks after gelding.

um No. He was knocked out cold to be gelded and has no idea what happened.

Iseul 03-26-2013 10:34 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by palogal (Post 2040514)
um No. He was knocked out cold to be gelded and has no idea what happened.

Point being, last time he came to you he ended up sore and in discomfort..Not to mention he has no idea what happened during it (which is my way of thinking, not his..). Not that he'd actually remember if he wasn't knocked out..

Point being though, last time he came he left being sore.
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BlueSpark 03-27-2013 10:28 AM

Quote:

Point being, last time he came to you he ended up sore and in discomfort
disagree. having been there for 10+ gelding surgeries, I dont think any of them assosiate being uncomfortable with humans. they are a bit bewildered, and sore, but thats it.

I think sometimes we apply human logic to things. If you went out for dinner with friends and woke up missing a body part, I doubt they would be your friends any more, but to a horse, they get a routine needle, lose conciousness, and wake up sore. there is no "oh gosh, the humans must have done it!!" moment.

the slowness coming up to you and lack of friendliness is very likely just related to them feeling 'off'. give him a few more weeks and see what happens. all the colts I've seen(and adult stallions even) were vastly happier as geldings, less moody and more focused.

Dreamcatcher Arabians 03-27-2013 10:47 AM

I took my 5 year old stallion in to be gelded last May. He was gelded due to lack of use, not because he was a behaviour problem. He was always a total love bug, eager for hugs and kisses and even around a mare in heat, not hard to handle at all, though he was happy to "oblige" if we wanted him to. He had been hauled in the trailer with mares right next to him, no problems, no Vicks needed, nothing.

WELL! When we picked him up after his surgery, he came out of the stall all puffed up and studly, loaded him in the trailer and then put a couple of out of season mares on and he proceeded to just about tear the trailer apart. Brought him home, put him in a nice big round pen so he could move around and keep the swelling down, and he basically gave everyone the finger when we'd go out to feed or water. Nope, no kisses, forget it, don't wanna talk to ya. We kept him separated for a month, then turned him out with his girls. He was hilarious. He walked that pasture with his ears pinned for a month. Today, he's right back to being a big old love bug and wants ALL the attention.

My guess, and that's all it is, is that maybe the get a 'rush' of hormones when the surgery is done and then couple that with being sore/swollen and generally unhappy with life (think appendectomy pain in a human), and I think they just let us know that right now, life isn't great and they aren't liking it much. Once everything settles down and quits being sore, they come back to normal.


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