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-   -   Seeking opinions on Heel/Hoof angles (http://www.horseforum.com/hoof-care/seeking-opinions-heel-hoof-angles-161233/)

KeroKero 03-24-2013 04:54 PM

Seeking opinions on Heel/Hoof angles
 
1 Attachment(s)
So the proud expert that I am, having trimmed my own horse an entire two times, came across another issue during the last trim.

Looking over pictures I'd taken once I got home, I saw to my shock and horror that I'd trimmed the two fronts at different angles. One is lower than the other. He wasn't sore, I have videos of him a few days after fart-bucking like an idiot with his pasture mates. Anywho, both heels were trimmed by what looked to be live sole (waxy white, clear tubules, etc) and to just about where the periople ends, so I need a bit more to go on for heel height it seems.. and of course there's 20 websites with 20 different opinions. Many say to make the coffin bone "ground parallel" but then I found one that said to make it just shy of ground parallel, because when the horse steps, the whole leg/ankle dips down and it is at that stress point that the coffin bone should be even with the ground. That makes sense to me from a not-over-bending the DDFT perspective.

Thoughts? How do you other trimmers know what the heel should be brought back to? What angles do you aim for, roughly?

ugh... do I post a picture and suffer the wrath... ... okay. I'm going to be a bit more aggressive bringing back his toe next time, and bring a **** ruler to make sure his heels are the same height on each foot.

Attachment 137777

KeroKero 03-24-2013 05:24 PM

Man that picture turned out small. Here's the full size from photobucket:

http://i313.photobucket.com/albums/l...2.jpg:original

walkinthewalk 03-24-2013 06:41 PM

I'm not offering any thoughts, except to say wait for the Pros on this forum to help you:D

I sense some humor in your post, so I think it's safe to chuckle at your comments. There is nothing like a hoof picture to show the Owner what didn't get done that should have:-P

I could tell you stories about the pics of my foundered horse, showing the real and ugly truth, vs how I thought I saw them. It would curl your toe nails:lol:

There's some great great farriers & trimmers on this forum. Their comments somehow manage to be spot-on and make for great reading/learning for the rest of us:D

They may ask if you can provide more clear pics of the hooves - meaning not standing in the snow. Your horse looks like he's standing on level ground, do you have a piece of cardboard you could stand him on?

Set the camera on the ground to get the back view (heels) of the fronts and backs:) I speak from experience - lol lol lol

KeroKero 03-24-2013 06:43 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by walkinthewalk (Post 2013417)
I'm not offering any thoughts, except to say wait for the Pros on this forum to help you:D

I sense some humor in your post, so I think it's safe to chuckle at your comments. There is nothing like a hoof picture to show the Owner what didn't get done that should have:-P

I could tell you stories about the pics of my foundered horse, showing the real and ugly truth, vs how I thought I saw them. It would curl your toe nails:lol:

There's some great great farriers & trimmers on this forum. Their comments somehow manage to be spot-on and make for great reading/learning for the rest of us:D

ahahaha forum-phobia - the truth burns like sunlight!!! hisss XD

loosie 03-24-2013 08:02 PM

Were they/should they be perfectly symmetrical & even? None of us are & horses frequently have one fore more upright than the other. Yes, it looks like the toe is run out on the left fore & pulling it back will allow for tighter, more upright growth, but can't say much from those pics. White on white makes it less clear too ;-)

Re P3 angles, it appears from studies that a ground surface angle of around 3-5 degrees is optimum for soundness, and that ground parallel results in a 'broken back' hoof-pastern angle & all the problems that go with that.

KeroKero 03-24-2013 08:26 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by loosie (Post 2014137)
Were they/should they be perfectly symmetrical & even? None of us are & horses frequently have one fore more upright than the other. Yes, it looks like the toe is run out on the left fore & pulling it back will allow for tighter, more upright growth, but can't say much from those pics. White on white makes it less clear too ;-)

Re P3 angles, it appears from studies that a ground surface angle of around 3-5 degrees is optimum for soundness, and that ground parallel results in a 'broken back' hoof-pastern angle & all the problems that go with that.

Sorry for the white on white, where he is, there's just snow and more compacted snow right now. I don't have a board to put his foot on, would be a good idea.

The other thing I was thinking was, what if his heels really should be that low, but because his toe is so stretched forward, it makes the angle seem off? I don't know if I should trim again that far and see if he starts growing out tighter hoof wall at a different angle, or if I should leave more on to be safe - probably leave more to be safe...

princessfluffybritches 03-25-2013 12:19 AM

What landmarks were you trimming by?

KeroKero 03-25-2013 12:32 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by princessfluffybritches (Post 2016913)
What landmarks were you trimming by?

I said, live sole/periople

Trinity3205 03-25-2013 01:01 AM

Lets see the soles. Angle means nothing without knowing where all the landmarks are. Looks like you may have some flared toes in which case the angle means next to nothing. Beveling the break over back after mapping the foot may just be what the Dr ordered and allow tighter wall growth more in line with where this foot needs to be.

KeroKero 03-25-2013 09:25 AM

The offending hoof (40 degrees)

http://i313.photobucket.com/albums/l...9.jpg:original


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