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Brendagun 03-25-2013 07:47 PM

Charging Stallion
 
Goodness is this a mess. My cousin owns a three year old quarter horse stallion. He was given as a two for one 'deal' to my cousin, who was buying his first horse and thought a cute little yearling would be fun. He didn't get a PPE before buying. Anyways, eventually the horse was sent to where I board my horse and was broken and trained. I handled him a few times, just leading him from stall to stall, lunging him every now and then, and he didn't behave horribly. He tried to push your boundaries but I stopped any unwanted behavior. He even behaved rather nicely in the round pen during free lunging. He honestly just behaved like a young stud, and I didn't blame him, though I never lowered my standards for him.

About two weeks ago he was sent back to my cousin per his request, and it has all disintegrated from there. I got a call yesterday asking if I could stop by and look at the horse. It turns out he started charging my cousin whenever he lunged him. I told him charging is extremely unacceptable and it has to be stopped NOW, or someone is going to get hurt. I lunged the horse myself and noticed he would slowly start to get closer and closer every time I asked him to turn , and I stopped the behavior. My cousin has the stud's open door stall within the electric fencing of his field, and lets the horse follow him around and be in his personal space while he is working, which translates to the horse all over everyone. The horse has also taken up lipping and trying to nip you whenever he can He doesn't understand that you have to be strict with studs, and that they can hurt you. Or, he's trying to, and the learning curve is so steep for a first time hors owner to own a stud that isn't perfectly behaved.

In April the stud is being sent to breed a few mares, (not something I agree with, but not my horse), and at the end of the month he will return and be gelded and my gelding will be put to pasture with him. He is currently pastured alone, but not two acres away a man keeps his mares upwind. My question is, is there any hope for my cousin after this? He refuses to sell this horse, but is still learning the basics of horsemanship. I'm hoping to help him in any way I can. I can control the horse, but i cant be there everyday to help him. Will it become easier to control the stud after he is gelded, or will the results vary? Does anyone have any advice for the situation?

tbcrazy 03-25-2013 07:57 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Brendagun (Post 2027513)
Goodness is this a mess. My cousin owns a three year old quarter horse stallion. He was given as a two for one 'deal' to my cousin, who was buying his first horse and thought a cute little yearling would be fun. He didn't get a PPE before buying. Anyways, eventually the horse was sent to where I board my horse and was broken and trained. I handled him a few times, just leading him from stall to stall, lunging him every now and then, and he didn't behave horribly. He tried to push your boundaries but I stopped any unwanted behavior. He even behaved rather nicely in the round pen during free lunging. He honestly just behaved like a young stud, and I didn't blame him, though I never lowered my standards for him.

About two weeks ago he was sent back to my cousin per his request, and it has all disintegrated from there. I got a call yesterday asking if I could stop by and look at the horse. It turns out he started charging my cousin whenever he lunged him. I told him charging is extremely unacceptable and it has to be stopped NOW, or someone is going to get hurt. I lunged the horse myself and noticed he would slowly start to get closer and closer every time I asked him to turn , and I stopped the behavior. My cousin has the stud's open door stall within the electric fencing of his field, and lets the horse follow him around and be in his personal space while he is working, which translates to the horse all over everyone. The horse has also taken up lipping and trying to nip you whenever he can He doesn't understand that you have to be strict with studs, and that they can hurt you. Or, he's trying to, and the learning curve is so steep for a first time hors owner to own a stud that isn't perfectly behaved.

In April the stud is being sent to breed a few mares, (not something I agree with, but not my horse), and at the end of the month he will return and be gelded and my gelding will be put to pasture with him. He is currently pastured alone, but not two acres away a man keeps his mares upwind. My question is, is there any hope for my cousin after this? He refuses to sell this horse, but is still learning the basics of horsemanship. I'm hoping to help him in any way I can. I can control the horse, but i cant be there everyday to help him. Will it become easier to control the stud after he is gelded, or will the results vary? Does anyone have any advice for the situation?

Hmm, you're right about the breeding thing- I, too, disagree as it sounds like he's not worthy of breeding with the amount of training and where his mind is right now. But yes, without so many hormones he will become less "studdy", but bad manners are bad manners, and he needs to be set straight sooner rather than later. I wouldn't expect that just because he is gelded to get a totally different horse- he will still need to be schooled properly if your cousin wants a well mannered horse. They don't just "happen" by accident or with gelding :/

Brendagun 03-25-2013 08:25 PM

Yeah, breeding isn't what I would do with him. Granted- he is stud quality conformation wise, I'd just prefer he would be fully trained, proven, and put in his place. And if that didn't work, he would make a gorgeous gelding. The best case scenario in my mind is the stud losing his want to constantly try you after gelding, my cousin gaining some more horse sense, and no one getting hurt.

At the place I board there were fifteen people out on a trail ride. A man brought his stallion, a gorgeous dappled palomino with near perfect confo- and he never stepped a foot out of line. There were mares in heat riding with us, but the man simply rode upwind of them in courtesy to the stallion. I don't know if my cousin's horse could ever achieve something like that if he were left intact, but it left a big impression on me of how to handle a stallion correctly.

bbsmfg3 03-25-2013 08:31 PM

Never ever breed a misbehaving stud. Good way to get some one killed, especially a green horn. I'd be more than a little forcefully about breeding him. In fact, I'd tell cousin that you want ABSOLUTELY NOTHING to do with the horse if he breeds him this spring.

Manner them first, then breeding. The price of a few breeding is not worth getting killed for.

tbcrazy 03-25-2013 08:31 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Brendagun (Post 2027905)
Yeah, breeding isn't what I would do with him. Granted- he is stud quality conformation wise, I'd just prefer he would be fully trained, proven, and put in his place.

Well said- I think that should be true of all breeding stock, but that's just my opinion :) Sounds like you know what to look for though, your cousin is lucky that you're around at all!

waresbear 03-25-2013 08:33 PM

Unless your cousin gets some training on how to handle horses in general, this horse, gelded or not, is going to dominate him. Lets hope no one gets terribly hurt. Who is taking this horse to be used for breeding?

Brendagun 03-25-2013 08:46 PM

We had a very serious talk about the horse being dangerous. I told him that the fact he was charging him after only two weeks of being home was indicative of how he was handling him. He said he understood, and that he is trying to learn, but that he would refuse to sell that horse and that he needs the money for breeding right now. I don't agree with it at all, and I said I wouldn't help him if things got too crazy. Hes an adult, and will make his own decisions in the end. i can only warn him as much as i can, I even recommended a trainer. I love my cousin and want to help him, but I don't want to get killed. If things progress too much more its going to get dangerous for my own self- I'm not that good yet. And yet, with saying that, I can't help the feeling that if my cousin calls me after breeding him and before gelding him with a problem, I'll still go down there to help. I don't want to see either of them hurt.

I live in a small community, and several people had inquired about breeding. It hadn't actually been his intention in the beginning, but they talked him into it after he didnt want to sell it. Most of them are veteran horse people, so can handle aggressive horses. They even offered to trade him a well broke, calmer gelding, but he refused.

waresbear 03-25-2013 08:59 PM

Oh my, oh my, oh my. That is scary!

Brendagun 03-25-2013 09:01 PM

It gives me a stomach ache, to be honest. :?

countrylove 03-25-2013 09:08 PM

I can't offer advise but I sympathize :(

I have a cousin with a 3yr old stud who has horrible ground manners and rears. She also wants to breed before she gelds him. Its very frustrating but I finally had to step back and let her do her own thing. She is an adult and a stubborn hard headed one at that ;) so she is entitled to do what she wants no matter what I think (and Ive told her what I think). She is also my best friend and I love her to death :)
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