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verona1016 04-09-2013 12:57 PM

Sizing for standing wraps
 
My horse managed to cut himself on his rear leg Sunday night. It looked pretty nasty when I got there, but fortunately after it was cleaned up it turned out not to be too terrible. The vet put a couple stitches in and recommended wrapping it to keep it clean, then wrapping the other hind leg as well since he'll be overcompensating a bit until the injured leg feels better. She showed me how to wrap, but I don't quite have the proper equipment. I had to borrow some quilt wraps from my trainer and use vet wrap. The quilt wraps are a bit large for my boy, since he's only 15hh and my trainer's horses are all big warmbloods.

I'd like to get some no-bows and standing wraps but am not sure how to measure for them. The no-bows come in 12", 14" and 16" heights, and the standing wraps come in 9' and 12' lengths. How do I properly measure to get the right sizes?

Also- how often should I re-do standing bandages? Do I need to take them off for a certain amount of time periodically, or is it OK to have them on constantly until he's using his injured leg properly (I'm guessing that will be 1-2 weeks)?

Corporal 04-09-2013 01:00 PM

You measure the cannon bone length. If you're really not sure call the company and ask for sizing advice. I did that with Horseloverz last week bc they had schooling breeches on sale for $23 and I couldn't figure out their sizing chart.

xxdanioo 04-09-2013 01:02 PM

I use 16" quilts on my three year old gelding- he is about 15hh-15.1hh. Not sure the length of my wraps though..

The injured leg I rewrap every day. Not sure about the good leg.. Maybe just change it when the quilt/wrap gets dirty? I'm sure someone else will have an idea. I wasn't told to wrap my guys other leg, so I don't know. :)

CCH 04-09-2013 01:12 PM

Always go for the 6in x 12ft standing wrap length, especially with no bows. Trust me, you will not have any extra length. Most of my horses are 14.3-16.0 I use 14" for the front and 16" for the back because I like a little more length. You could easily use 14 for all 4 legs.

I am partial to the Pro-Choice no bows, look for the ones with stitching the long way rather than vertical because they wrap around the leg more uniformly. I also like schneider's standing wraps.

crimsonsky 04-09-2013 01:14 PM

it really depends on how much coverage you want for you horse's legs. i use 16" and 18"s no-bows on my 17.1hh gelding and 12" and 14" (or 14" and 16") on my 14.1hh mare. the standing wraps are typically going to be long enough for whatever size you end up getting. i've not had to get the extra long ones for my gelding so i'd guess you'd be okay with whatever ones the store has or that you order. if they end up being a little shorter than what you feel you need, start a little lower on the leg to end up at the top/right spot still.

when i use standing wraps for wound covering/dressing, i change it out twice a day and i always have taken off the corresponding support wrap (for the other leg) and re-wrapped at the time i redo the wound wrap. just makes for both legs to be consistent feeling and checked over. i don't find wrapping takes much time but that also depends on how comfortable and competent you are at it.

~*~anebel~*~ 04-09-2013 01:15 PM

I'm not a big fan of standing quilts - I definitely prefer the no bows.

I use 12" on the front and 14" on the rear. I don't like to wrap below the fetlock because on my guy it really irritates him, it can also cause bunching and the wrap to be lumpy.
If you are putting a no stick pad over the wound, it will be OK to reuse the same no bow every day until it gets dirty. If not, I would recommend changing the no bow every day.
You also don't have to wrap the opposing leg. That's an old wives tale. Try to avoid wrapping as many legs as possible because the lymphatic system will get used to having a wrap on the leg, and then when you remove the wrap the horse will stock up (which can be painful). This IMO is not a good thing to do for a leg that doesn't absolutely need to be wrapped.

Good luck!

walkinthewalk 04-09-2013 01:17 PM

This EquiSearch article will be helpful in terms of proper sizes:D

Leg Wraps Unlimited

Note where says:
Quote:

Back legs usually are longer than front
Regarding how often to change:

My horse had torn ligaments on both front legs. I changed his quilts and wraps twice a day and ran them thru the washer & dryer daily.

He was dealing with founder and torn ligaments, I was not about to subject him to scurf because I didn't change his wraps.

IMHO, I would espcially adhere to twice daily when dealing with a sutured wound the vet wants wrapped.

Unless the wound is right on the hock or in the bend, I disagree with the vet wanting it wrapped in this manner. I would cover the wound in another manner. But that's what he told you, so that's what you need to do:-):-)

Anyway, the EquiSearch article should be of help to you:D

CCH 04-09-2013 01:24 PM

OP if you have reason to be worried about supporting limb laminitis, you should check out soft-ride boots. Welcome to Soft-Ride Gel Equine Comfort Boots / Horse Boots
I use them for hauling and at shows with lots of pavement as well as for injured horses.

verona1016 04-09-2013 01:44 PM

Thanks for all the help :-) It sounds like 14" will probably be a good size for his rear legs, but I'll measure next time I see him just to be sure. Hopefully I can find something locally, but I haven't always had the best luck when looking for something specific. At least if I have to order it in I will have much more choice!

Quote:

Originally Posted by walkinthewalk (Post 2177329)
This EquiSearch article will be helpful in terms of proper sizes:D

Leg Wraps Unlimited

Note where says:

Regarding how often to change:

My horse had torn ligaments on both front legs. I changed his quilts and wraps twice a day and ran them thru the washer & dryer daily.

He was dealing with founder and torn ligaments, I was not about to subject him to scurf because I didn't change his wraps.

IMHO, I would espcially adhere to twice daily when dealing with a sutured wound the vet wants wrapped.

Unless the wound is right on the hock or in the bend, I disagree with the vet wanting it wrapped in this manner. I would cover the wound in another manner. But that's what he told you, so that's what you need to do:-):-)

Anyway, the EquiSearch article should be of help to you:D

The article is definitely helpful!

Out of curiosity, how would you wrap/cover differently? The wound is well below the hock joint, towards the outside/front of the leg, ~1.5" to 2" slit IIRC.

CCH 04-09-2013 02:16 PM

using a no-bow over a gauze pad with antibiotic ointment will be much cheaper than vet wrap in the long run. It will probably keep the wound cleaner than a sticky bandage and you won't have to worry about the "glue" in the vet wrap damaging the hair. I think there is also some claims that a little pressure helps prevent proud flesh. I don't know if there is any truth to that, but it certainly can't hurt.

I can't really think of any other ways to wrap a leg other than vet wrap, plain polo, or standing wraps. Unless you buy some sort of premade boot or bandage.


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