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QrtrHrseOwnr 11-08-2008 01:56 PM

Obese easy keeper that keeps getting fatter
 
I have a 14 yr old Quarter Horse gelding. He had EPM in his early years and from that he has an anemia problem due to a red blood cell deficiency which is controlled through the supplementation of Red Cell in his diet. He currently gets a small amount of "Carb Guard" pellets.

The problem is that he has always been on the heavy side however recently it has gotten much worse. He is not ridden as much as he should be due to me being in college. He has always been an easy keeper and the barn he is at has switched to round bales in the fields for convenience. (Switching barns or to a field that does not have round bales is not an option.) He does nothing but eat hay constantly while out (which is usually all day and all night). I was considering a grazing muzzle but they are meant for grass not hay. Besides since it being winter, water consumption may be hard and there is a chance it might freeze to his nose. Are grazing muzzles effective for hay consumption reduction or will it not allow him to eat hay at all?

I have recently ordered D-Carb Balance in hopes that it will help regulate his blood glucose which might be a factor of his obesity. Any thoughts?

Any other tips/advice would be very helpful.

SonnyWimps 11-08-2008 02:44 PM

do you have any freinds or people at the barn that would be willing to excersize him for you?
My horse is an easy keeper, gets roundbales and always is eating. I do have a problem keep weight off of him, but I also fail to go up as often as I should to ride. It gets dark at 4:30 now so it's hard.
What I am planning to do, in the summer, if I can't ride my horse, I'll call my one friend that LOVES to ride and ask her if she would like to ride my horse to give him excercize. I have many many friends that would JUMP at the opportunity to ride for free and my horse would get getting excersize.

I do not know if a grazing muzzle would work on hay...never tried it and really never plan to.

Also one thing to remember, he'll loose weight during the winter...most horses do...so at the moment I'm alright with my horse being fat cause he is one of the horses that looses alot during the winter.

Peggysue 11-08-2008 03:49 PM

how small of amount of the pellets??

Look into a Mg supplement... think MagOX is the cheapest you can get like $20 for about 2 years worth last time I priced it !!!

a grazing muzzle will allow hay grazing but somebody is gonna have to watch it and make sure it is not rubbing or he is not getting it off... water consumation with them on is no big deal at all... is there any way you can stall board him and control the amount of hay he is getting??

QrtrHrseOwnr 11-08-2008 04:04 PM

He gets a light quarter of a scoop.

Thanks for the tips ill look into that supplement

Peggysue 11-08-2008 04:45 PM

what size scoop?? any idea on teh weight of it ??

You might be better off goign wtih t apelleted vitamin/mineral supplement with the MagOx better nutrition and lowe rsugars

KANSAS_TWISTER 11-08-2008 05:21 PM

like SW i too prefer to have a horse on the fat side for winter!!, is there some way that some one can ride him once ro twice a week or maybe let the barn use him in lessons once or twice a week?

QrtrHrseOwnr 11-08-2008 05:26 PM

He is actually in a lesson program and is also exercised as often as possible by a friend

to the other post, its about a 5 pt scooper id say

rayluckgoo 11-13-2008 08:43 PM

I have a 15 year old Mutt gelding that's obese. He gets no grain...just 1/2 c of a vitamin/mineral mix/day but he lives with a 24yo Tbred gelding that does great as long as he has as much hay as he wants. I use a grazing muzzle 12 hrs/day but Magoo literally sucks hay into it like somebody sucking a spaghetti noodle. I'm not having much luck getting him to lose weight.

Ryle 11-16-2008 10:07 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by QrtrHrseOwnr (Post 183833)
I have a 14 yr old Quarter Horse gelding. He had EPM in his early years and from that he has an anemia problem due to a red blood cell deficiency which is controlled through the supplementation of Red Cell in his diet.



First off, the whole anemia due to EPM in his early life thing is a load of huey. EPM does not cause anemia. The 3 drug combination (sulfadiazine/pyrimethamine/trimethoprim) that used to be used to treat EPM years ago could cause anemia, but it would not continue to cause anemia after treatment. Anemia is also often mis-diagnosed in horses. If a horse is not worked prior to a blood draw, mild decreases in PCV and red blood cell count are nothing to worry about because the horse stores up to 30% of it's red blood cells in the spleen and only puts them into circulation when needed. That means that an RBC and PCV on a resting horse does not indicate the full number of actual red blood cells present in the body.

Having said that, Red Cell is really not an apt supplement to treat anemia anyway as anemia due to iron deficiency (or other mineral deficiency) is very rare in horses. Red Cell just serves a vitamin and mineral supplement. It won't prevent anemia though it may help a horse rebuild red blood cells if he in fact does lose some through blood loss or red blood cell destruction due to disease. And it may be providing a good bit of extra sugars in his diet due to the artificial cherry flavoring in it.

Quote:

Originally Posted by QrtrHrseOwnr (Post 183833)
The problem is that he has always been on the heavy side however recently it has gotten much worse. He is not ridden as much as he should be due to me being in college. He has always been an easy keeper and the barn he is at has switched to round bales in the fields for convenience. (Switching barns or to a field that does not have round bales is not an option.) He does nothing but eat hay constantly while out (which is usually all day and all night). I was considering a grazing muzzle but they are meant for grass not hay. Besides since it being winter, water consumption may be hard and there is a chance it might freeze to his nose. Are grazing muzzles effective for hay consumption reduction or will it not allow him to eat hay at all?

Quote:

Originally Posted by QrtrHrseOwnr (Post 183833)

I have recently ordered D-Carb Balance in hopes that it will help regulate his blood glucose which might be a factor of his obesity. Any thoughts?

Any other tips/advice would be very helpful.

What kind of hay is he getting? Sounds like he is on free choice, right? Has he ever had laminitis? Does he drink or urinate excessively?

The first thing to do would be to cut his hay intake down to 1-1.5% of his body weight per day. If there are any risk signs of insulin resistance (history of laminitis, drinking/urinating alot, fat pads at tail head, shoulders, cresty neck) then getting your hay tested to ensure that it's not high in non-structural carbs would also be a good idea or at the very least start soaking your hay in cold water for 30 minutes prior to feeding to help reduce the amount of carbs in it.

If he has indicators for IR, it would also be a good idea to talk to your vet about running a screening test like a resting serum insulin.

These are the places to start rather than spending your money on this supplement or that supplement.

amandaandeggo 11-16-2008 10:30 AM

sounds like eggo . . . except for a little worse . . . eggo just get 3 handfulls of 10% sweet feed twice a day


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