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-   -   What is a good age to start lungeing??? (http://www.horseforum.com/horse-training/what-good-age-start-lungeing-17398/)

shermanismybaby3006 11-11-2008 08:40 PM

What is a good age to start lungeing???
 
I was wondering what is a good age to start lungeing? Even if its just a little walk and trot.? I have been told that it is fine to lunge as a yearling by some people and then now people are telling me differently. Thanks in advanced:D

SonnyWimps 11-11-2008 08:56 PM

IMO to any horse, lunging is extremely hard on their legs and joints and doesn't really do too much good for the horse (my view on it anyways).
I don't know what the "correct" age to lunge is, but it should be when the legs and joints fully mature

nascarcats 11-11-2008 09:18 PM

I "googled" that once before. An article I read said 18 months, and then only for about 5 mins each way. It is hard on the joints so doing it in small time increments should be fine

My2Geldings 11-11-2008 10:28 PM

Lunging is quite rough on baby joints. I wouldn't lunge until they are at least of riding age. You should consult with your trainer :)

Jukochoko 11-12-2008 12:43 AM

3 years old would be a good start. don't lunge for too long though, probably 5 to 10 min each hand. use your voice a lot, it is very important that you make a clear sound/word so the horse understands what you ask him to do. never give up on that word until he understands it for ex: walk! you will keep saying 'walk' until he actually walks. also best work on the lunging would be galloping and/ or trotting with polls on the floor with correct measure it muscles their back a lot.

HTS 11-13-2008 12:21 AM

I'd second (or is that third?) that lunging shouldn't be started until riding age. So at least three. If you want to be training and interacting with your younger horse, take him out on a walk on a lead rope. Or pony him. Both of these get your horse used to new sights and smells, gets their confidence up around people and you can teach them plenty of voice commands which will transfer to when you're in the saddle or lunging them when they're older.

smrobs 11-20-2008 04:48 AM

Quote:

If you want to be training and interacting with your younger horse, take him out on a walk on a lead rope. Or pony him. Both of these get your horse used to new sights and smells, gets their confidence up around people and you can teach them plenty of voice commands which will transfer to when you're in the saddle or lunging them when they're older.
EXACTLY!!! There are so many other things that you can teach a colt without lunging them. Teach them respect and leading, to let you pick up and mess with their feet, things on their back and around their legs. Use a saddle pad to accustom them to things being thrown onto their back. Rub them down all over and swing the lead rope around their legs and butt. Desensitize them to spooky objects such as tarps, plastic bags, barrels, etc. It is very hard on their growth plates in their joints to use them hard and at an angle (happens when you lunge) and you could end up with a horse that has to be retired by 18 or 19 instead of one that is being used until he is 24 or 25.

DarkChylde 11-20-2008 07:18 AM

I am really glad to see so many know the dangers of lungeing, it is unnatural for a horse to go in tight circles for long periods (tho I see it done enough:evil:) and it not only does no good for exercise or training, but can mess a horse up, straining their legs and building up the wrong muscles. Lotsa studies.

However, if NOT overused and abused, it can be ok, I used to lunge myself back in the day, but I have found round penning to be far more productive as far as training (I can get my horse to do anything someone lungeing a horse can do, and without rope or halter (or whip in my case!)) and as far as exercise. If you do, I agree not to start earlier than 3.

CallieMae 11-20-2008 09:24 AM

I also agree to wait until they are of riding age since it is hard on joints. I lunge my horses as a way to work on their suppleness and bending, and it seems to have helped. It can be a useful training technique. You can lunge them with a surcingle and pad on, rather than leading them with it. It also lets you observe their gate easily, again unlike leading them. So, I guess if you are wanting to lunge, just wait until the horse is old enough to ride...good luck with the training/lunging!=)=)

Britt 11-20-2008 08:02 PM

I believe that lunging as a yearling and two year old is fine, as long as it's ONLY a walk just a few times around both ways and is then done... and is only done rarely.

I'm planning on starting my gelding on 'real' lunge work (walk, trot, canter, halt) next year when he's three.


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