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hberrie 04-13-2013 01:57 PM

Stubborn grass hog!
 
If I try to pull my horse away from grass or deny him of it he pulls away from me on the lead, half rears and acts like he wants to fight about it. I don't know what to do because I hate this behavior especially if I am riding him. I don't want to be pulled out of the saddle because he wants a snack. what should I do to correct this? He rebels against discipline and fights back. He is soon to be 8 and reminds me of my teenager lol.

Dreamcatcher Arabians 04-13-2013 02:04 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by hberrie (Post 2217065)
If I try to pull my horse away from grass or deny him of it he pulls away from me on the lead, half rears and acts like he wants to fight about it. I don't know what to do because I hate this behavior especially if I am riding him. I don't want to be pulled out of the saddle because he wants a snack. what should I do to correct this? He rebels against discipline and fights back. He is soon to be 8 and reminds me of my teenager lol.

I would kick his a$$ til he begged for mercy. On the ground I'd carry a whip and I'd use it very liberally, and I'd make him go to work every time he even thought of heading for grass without my permission. In the saddle, he'd learn what spurs and a crop were all about until he stopped even asking permission to graze while I was mounted. Again, he'd get put to work every single time he asked to graze. This horse is taking severe advantage of you and has zero respect for you as leader/boss. This type of horse would NEVER be allowed to hand graze or graze under saddle if he was mine.

hberrie 04-13-2013 02:12 PM

When I have whacked him on the ground before he has kicked me very hard. I obviously am not quick enough or agile enough and he is faster and more accurate than I am. How do you smack a horse without getting smacked back? I know I am setting myself up for criticism here, but I honestly am not very coordinated lol.

Dreamcatcher Arabians 04-13-2013 02:42 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by hberrie (Post 2217233)
When I have whacked him on the ground before he has kicked me very hard. I obviously am not quick enough or agile enough and he is faster and more accurate than I am. How do you smack a horse without getting smacked back? I know I am setting myself up for criticism here, but I honestly am not very coordinated lol.

I would put him on a lunge line, at least 25 ft long, and I'd carry a lunge whip so that when it's out there, it's longer than your arm. That can keep you out of each other's space. If you can't spank him, then shank him, put a stud chain on him and pop him with that a few times when he doesn't listen. Sounds like maybe you need to take him to a trainer and get some ground manners lessons. That horse wouldn't have kicked me more than once, he'd either have "Come to Jaysus" or he'd be down the road. There a too many nice horses out there to tolerate a pig, but you have to be able to enforce the "nice horse only" rules in order to keep them nice.

Saddlebag 04-13-2013 02:56 PM

I use annoying taps on the same spot on his hip. Use a stick no less than 4' so you don't get kicked. Try to stay in the saddle area. I give a light tug on the halter, just a signal, then if he doesn't lift his head, start tapping, enough that he feels it but not hurt. The moment his nose comes off the ground, put the stick/whip to point behind you. Start walking with him and as soon as he nose dives, ask again and start tapping. Be patient and do it until a touch on the halter will bring his nose up and it will stay up. You must teach this from the ground first. When you ride, a light touch on the bit and start tapping a little behind your leg. Keep it rhythmic. The tapping is to annoy, not inflict pain.

Corporal 04-13-2013 03:09 PM

I always wear boots when I train so that my foot becomes an extension of my...well, I guess, My HAND.
I kick mine with the toe of my boot under their head (further back from the chin/curbchain area.) They always pay attention to that. You don't have to kick hard as if you are punting a football. I also say, "head up" at the same time so as to teach them an "English" command. My horses are usually surprised by this but not frightened. ALL I want is to not have to yank or bend over, where I am in a compromised physical position. Yanking away to eat more is a pet peeve of mine, especially with 3 easy keepers who have been wasting expensive hay lately. =/
My horses and dogs understand a LOT of English. When I walk the cat walk above their shelter's manger, I say the name of my horse and say, "watch your head" when I fill it. They move their heads away so that they aren't covered with hay.
Btw, I have heard that some multilingual people praise their horses in French and audibly discipline them in German. Just an FYI.

Dustbunny 04-13-2013 03:12 PM

Yikes! Do you have a trainer or really experienced horse person close? It sounds like this horse has managed to appoint himself as the leader. I don't know how much experience you have so it can be difficult to give instructions if you don't know the proceedures.
There is information on lunging for respect on line. That might help. But it would be good to have someone there with you to start. There are also good DVDs available at well supplied feed and tack stores. You need to put a stop to his bad behavior but in the process you don't want to make the situation worse either. That's why I suggest getting help and as soon as possible.
It's important to learn how to control this because even if you got rid of this horse and got another one, the same issues could crop up again if you don't take a leadership roll. Horses are good at taking over if there is a void in leadership, and some way more aggressively that others.
Dreamcatcher has suggestions. I'm sure others will have info for you, too. The horse needs to put in his place and you need to stay safe. This is a scary thing.

Foxhunter 04-13-2013 03:41 PM

I agree with Corporal - use your foot.
When you are going to ride him get two pieces bailer twine. Te a piece to the bit each side and the other to the saddle near the pommel thee need not be tight but tight enough to stop hs head reaching the ground.

In general you need to get someone to help you teach your horse some manners. This eating when you do not want him to is only part of your problem because I have absolutely no doubt there are other ill mannered problems too.

Dreamcatcher Arabians 04-13-2013 03:58 PM

I fall into the category of "Bless her Heart, she's just not got that eye-foot coordination thing goin' on". When I try to kick a horse, I generally end up dumping myself on my butt and hurting my foot. I'm deadly with a lunge whip though....thus my recommendations.

Corporal 04-13-2013 04:00 PM

Those are good recommendations. I just added MY 2 cents bc of lurkers who don't have this bad of a problem.
Dancing helps your eye-foot coordination, btw.


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