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Regula 04-13-2013 01:53 PM

Laminitis MUCH worse after trim
 
My horse Leo came down with a relatively mild episode of laminitis last weekend.
The vet was out, Leo was put on Bute and stall rest. I soaked his feet twice a day, soaked his (all grass) hay to reduce the soluble carbs, and Leo was doing much better by Wednesday afternoon, so I reduced his Bute on Thursday.
Yesterday (Friday, so five days after he started the laminitis episode) the farrier came out and trimmed him. I was there in the morning, but couldn't be there when the farrier came, cause I had to work. However, I had talked to him beforehand about the instructions the vet gave for trimming, and the BO was there too (she knew the story and was there when the vet explained what to do).
When I came out last night I was shocked. Leo was MUCH worse than ever before, the farrier cut him pretty short, he has the typical "founder" posture now with his front feet stretched out in front of him. He can barely stand and walk, shifts his weight from one foot to the other and sways. Soaking his feet seems painful (he was fine with it the days before), but he's barely coordinated enough to step out of the water by himself now (I use shallow feed pans, not buckets).
I called the farrier immediately and he claimed that it's normal for them to become worse for a few days after trimming - but seriously, it just doesn't feel right that he's so much worse even compared to when he started the episode.
I called the vet (who is out if town for the weekend) and we upped Leo's Bute again, but of course we can't do that forever either for the fear of ulcers. Vet will come out and take another look at him on Monday.

I know that the horse can become touchy after trimming, but is it really normal for a horse with laminitis to become THAT bad?
Is there anything else I can do to make him more comfortable other than soft padding in the stall and bute?
Would hoof hardener or something like that help right now? Hoof supplements?
Should I put boots on him? Can you even put boots on for longer periods of time without rubbing?

Will upload some pics as soon as I figure out how from my phone.

stevenson 04-13-2013 02:00 PM

ask the VEt if you can wrap his hoof in cotton to help with the tenderness issues, The founder could just have really kicked in , causing the soreness and that you had reduced his bute, it could have hidden the pain. Maybe put some ice on his feet for a while. Sorry to hear about your horse. Hopefully he wil be usable again. poor guy..

Corporal 04-13-2013 02:13 PM

I am SOO SORRY!! **hugs and prayers sent for quick recovery**
In hindsight, perhaps you shouldn't have had him trimmed, but I think he'll recover, just gonna take longer. POOR BOY!!! =(

~*~anebel~*~ 04-13-2013 02:20 PM

Duct tape Styrofoam onto his feet. Go grab a sheet of the Styrofoam they use for insulation, cut it into his hoof shapes and duct tape it on. Replace as often as they get flat.

Other than that bute and cold hosing is about all you can do.

Good luck!
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Regula 04-13-2013 02:56 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Corporal (Post 2217673)
In hindsight, perhaps you shouldn't have had him trimmed

That's what I'm thinking too. I'm pretty aggravated right now and had to leave quickly yesterday before I'd start yelling at someone who wasn't responsible.
I don't want to accuse the farrier of having done a botch job, but it just doesn't seem right that Leo would go so lame after a proper trim.
Either way, there's only the way forward now.

Thanks for the tip with the styrofoam, anebel, I might try that. Another farrier (that happened to be there today) also recommended these gel boots:
Clinical Facts about Soft-Ride Gel Equine Comfort Boots
It seems like they need to be ordered online, and it'll take at least a week for them to deliver to Canada, but has anyone ever used them? And if yes, were they worth the money?

Corporal 04-13-2013 03:02 PM

I like the styrofoam. It weighs practically nothing and the hardware stores all carry it.

Cacowgirl 04-13-2013 03:08 PM

I think post-poning the trim would have been best, but now the horse needs to be comfortable. Try the ideas here & try to keep him on soft footing. Most horses recover from a short trim in about a week-hope it is even sooner for you.

Regula 04-13-2013 03:29 PM

Here are some photos I took earlier today. He trimmed him quite short, and rasped his front hoof wall pretty thin (the white on the front was never visible before
http://www.abload.de/img/img_20130413_084024j4uas.jpg

http://www.abload.de/img/img_20130413_084108wluf9.jpg

http://www.abload.de/img/img_20130413_084140e7un5.jpg

left front
http://www.abload.de/img/img_20130413_084056o8uxk.jpg

right front
http://www.abload.de/img/img_20130413_084123exuxl.jpg

~*~anebel~*~ 04-13-2013 03:48 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Regula (Post 2218177)
That's what I'm thinking too. I'm pretty aggravated right now and had to leave quickly yesterday before I'd start yelling at someone who wasn't responsible.
I don't want to accuse the farrier of having done a botch job, but it just doesn't seem right that Leo would go so lame after a proper trim.
Either way, there's only the way forward now.

Thanks for the tip with the styrofoam, anebel, I might try that. Another farrier (that happened to be there today) also recommended these gel boots:
Clinical Facts about Soft-Ride Gel Equine Comfort Boots
It seems like they need to be ordered online, and it'll take at least a week for them to deliver to Canada, but has anyone ever used them? And if yes, were they worth the money?

My farrier has a few sets of those boots that he lends out to clients (he does a lot of rehab work) and they seem to be really good.
I'm actually going to talk to him about what kind of boots to get for a barefoot horse and I like those because then I can use them for hauling and stuff.

However, you do need something right away and unless you can get them today, I'd just do the styrofoam... It's what gets recommended around here for laminitic horses, and is much less $$

Trinity3205 04-13-2013 05:23 PM

IMO, Id try casting this horses feet and stop soaking the foot as it softens the sole and makes the horse more sore. Casting will provide immediate support and relief for both the laminitus and the trim. Also Durasole may help.

Also, Im assuming the reason for laminitus has been remedied and removed.


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