The Horse Forum

The Horse Forum (/)
-   Horse Health (http://www.horseforum.com/horse-health/)
-   -   Mud Fever (http://www.horseforum.com/horse-health/mud-fever-174449/)

JumpingJiminy 04-14-2013 12:45 AM

Mud Fever
 
I believe that my gelding has developed Mud Fever, although it doesn't look bad at all. Yet I'm not 100% sure that it IS Mud Fever, I don't have any pictures currently unfortunately, and I'm not really sure how to describe it but it's not wet and there's no puss under but there were thick scabs that if you were to pull it out it came out with hair.
My first question is.. Can Mud Fever go away on its own? My boy is looking better every day and there is hair growing back, I'm convinced that it's healing.
My next question is, what do you think is one of the most affective ways to treat Mud Fever?
I apologize if I sound like an idiot, I know relatively nothing about Mud Fever except that of what I've read.

Wallaby 04-14-2013 01:19 AM

I would imagine that Mud Fever could go away seemingly "on it's own," if conditions were right (some kind of natural vitamin A increase - MF has been linked to low Vit A levels, or some kind of major immune system bump), that that seems sort of unlikely to me. But who knows!!

My mare used to have chronic Mud Fever due to low immune function (she has an auto-immune disease that was undiagnosed for years - once it was diagnosed and we began treating her with natural immune boosting "stuff," she hasn't had a case of Mud Fever since!) and my game plan was always to shave those legs down, keep them really clean and dry, shampoo them once a week with this stuff, dry the legs thoroughly, then liberally spray this stuff all over the skin+scabs on the affected legs, THEN, final step, I would cover each scab with this cream. I'd use the cream twice a day but only use the spray after washing the legs and only shampoo the legs once a week (don't want to dry them out too much by washing them too often).

That worked really pretty well for my mare (I also had a goat get mud fever and this same regimen worked in about a week on her! haha).
Of course, once I got her immune issues under control, mud fever was a thing of the past but you know.

The other cause of Mud Fever is usually a Vitamin A deficiency. I'm not familiar with how people deal with it that way but there are many people on the forum who are "in the know" that way. In case she doesn't come along, I know 'Trinity' is someone who will know - might be worthwhile to pm her. :)
It's something to do with significantly increasing the Vit A the horse is getting via a dose of some kind of cattle Vitamin A supplement that really bags out the V.A....I don't know. haha

Good luck! Mud Fever can be frustrating!!

makie3 08-09-2013 08:16 AM

Hey Jiminy,
My Irish gelding had a bit of Mud Fever in one of her hoofs. I was told it was indeed due to the wet conditions in her paddock. I heard a lot of different advice on how to treat it, but I believe the main thing is to remove the bacteria through washing. My friend tried Nolvasan before rinsing and drying, then I appling a mixture of Desitin. I personally prefer Joveg Mud Fever hoof bath. It's really easy to use and is made form natural products. I think it comes from Germany, but I just make a bucket of water with the soap in it and soak the leg a bit so that the anticeptic gets in all the right places. I then make sure the hoof is dry and keep it bandaged to keep the moisture out. GOOD LUCK!

hbray99 08-09-2013 08:45 AM

One of the best ways to stop mud fever at all is to not hose your ponies foot at all because it will help mud get under your horse skin. As for treating your mud fever there are some great cream you can to put on your horses foot.
hope I helped

texasgal 08-09-2013 08:49 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by makie3 (Post 3302122)
Hey Jiminy,
My Irish gelding had a bit of Mud Fever in one of her hoofs. I was told it was indeed due to the wet conditions in her paddock. I heard a lot of different advice on how to treat it, but I believe the main thing is to remove the bacteria through washing. My friend tried Nolvasan before rinsing and drying, then I appling a mixture of Desitin. I personally prefer Joveg Mud Fever hoof bath. It's really easy to use and is made form natural products. I think it comes from Germany, but I just make a bucket of water with the soap in it and soak the leg a bit so that the anticeptic gets in all the right places. I then make sure the hoof is dry and keep it bandaged to keep the moisture out. GOOD LUCK!

Welcome to the forum.. :wave:

texasgal 08-09-2013 08:50 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by hbray99 (Post 3302258)
One of the best ways to stop mud fever at all is to not hose your ponies foot at all because it will help mud get under your horse skin. As for treating your mud fever there are some great cream you can to put on your horses foot.
hope I helped


Welcome to the forum! :wave:

KigerQueen 08-13-2013 03:31 AM

Happened to my mare. I washed it everyday with the green Listerine mouth wash. Cleared it right up and inexpensive. Just added a little bit to watered down shampoo.

Running Whisper 08-14-2013 11:41 AM

When my gelding had it my farrier said to not wash it because it was from wet pastures so it wouldnt help. He recommended either scarlet oil or vasiline and just apply that every day. It would usually clear up in a week or two.

verona1016 08-14-2013 12:58 PM

I'd like to add the caveat that rinsing off the mud is helpful if the horse has somewhere to dry off. Last winter we had lots of cases of mud fever at my barn from the muddier-than-usual turnouts. The mud was caked on so thick after turnout that it would stay wet on the horses' legs for several hours (in some cases it was still wet on the innermost layer near the skin the next day when they were turned out again, so it never really dried at all). They started hosing down the legs after bringing the horses in and it helped immensely- since the horses were going into clean, dry stalls, the legs dried off from the hosing pretty quickly and were dry and clean until the next turnout.

KigerQueen 08-14-2013 03:39 PM

The thing about using the Listerine is that its alcohol so it dries and an antiseptic as well. If you wash it you have to dry it. When my mare had mud fever I was at a loss, but then when my vet tech friend had me try the mouthwash it cleared it up in 3 days.


All times are GMT -4. The time now is 09:07 AM.

Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.5
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Search Engine Friendly URLs by vBSEO 3.6.0