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donemoven farm 04-25-2013 02:07 PM

Grass foundered horse.
 
I foundered my horse on this spring grass. I have only had him since oct. 2012.
I know that he has never been pastured. I have 10 acres of grass pasture and with the price of hay, I wanted to use it as much as possible. I was advised to ease him on it ,so I grazed him just 20 mins a day for the fist week and then an hour the next week. I had him up to 2 hrs a day at the end of the month. He was still getting hay and oats tho a smaller ration. He is a 13yr. old MFT. Went out one morn and he could barely walk. I feel so bad. I did this to him. He is better now. ( its been about 10 days since) My question is have anyone been thru this with their horse. Will I be able to ride him again and when will I know?
He seems pretty good now. Thanks for your input.

kitten_Val 04-25-2013 02:11 PM

DF, I'd remove the grain from his ration, and if you still keep him on grass get him a grazing muzzle. Did you call the vet and/or farrier? What did they say?

Shropshirerosie 04-25-2013 02:44 PM

Yes, I did it to my pony a couple of years ago - don't feel bad,it happens. But do learn from your experience :-)

I agree that he should come off the oats pronto.

As to the grass & the hay;

What he ideally needs is lots of low protein fibre. I don't know what your hay is, so I can't comment on whether it is helping him, or making him worse. If it's rich hay, then get him off that too. If it has alfalfa it it, get him off it yesterday!

These are the basic rules for a laminitic:

- once a laminitic, always a laminitic.

- learn to check the hooves daily for heat, and learn to check for a digital pulses which is an indicator of something amiss in the foot.

- slim is good, slim and fit is best

- nighttime grass is better than daytime grass

- rough grass is better than lush green grass.

- involve your farrier, and vet if necessary

Have a look at Paddock Paradise on the web. It's a horse management system that advocates putting in a 'track' in your pasture that will restrict horses grass intake, but keep them moving in a natural way. I'm going to be doing this in my pasture this summer with temporary electric fencing. Essentially, the horses will be on a track around the perimeter of my pasture, and the inner circle will be growing ready for winter feeding.

SMCLeenie 04-25-2013 03:19 PM

My horse foundered right after we got him, it took him a few months to recover fully but we were able to ride again. I'd ask your farrier when/how to get him ready for riding again, keeping in mind it might be a while.

hberrie 04-25-2013 06:26 PM

I don't understand why eating grass causes a horse to founder. Isn't that what they do in the wild. I guess I don't understand at all what founder is and what causes it. What should I do to prevent it? Sorry if I hijacked this thread!

Speed Racer 04-25-2013 06:35 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by hberrie (Post 2346625)
I don't understand why eating grass causes a horse to founder. Isn't that what they do in the wild. I guess I don't understand at all what founder is and what causes it. What should I do to prevent it? Sorry if I hijacked this thread!

Feral horses don't have lush pasturage, but even they can become susceptible to founder. The only difference is that they die, unlike the horses we keep as domestic livestock.

Feral horses are no less susceptible to anything that can take down a domestic one, it's just that there's no one there to intervene and take care of them when something bad happens.

Here's some information for you. How can you own horses and not know about the causes of laminitis and founder? Besides colic, sinking founder is probably one of the biggest trauma reasons horses are euthanized.

Triple S Equine

Laminitis, Danger In the Grass

the foundered horse

Grass Founder, cause, what is it, treatment...

hberrie 04-25-2013 06:46 PM

Thank you Speed Racer, but I must ask....Is it impossible for you to give a response without demeaning or demoralizing the other person????? Your advice is helpful, but you act arrogant. Stab a knife in my throat because I don't have a PHD in veterinary science!! YOU are very full of yourself.

Sahara 04-25-2013 06:55 PM

It is just frustrating to hear about stories where horses are put through hell at the expense of the owner's ignorance. People think having horses is easy peasy. It isn't. It requires hard work, knowledge, money, and management. You'd think more people would do a little homework and be proactive with horse care rather than reactive.

hberrie 04-25-2013 07:02 PM

I just asked a question. I board at a very large and well managed barn so I don't have to deal with these issues. I am trying to learn as much as I can so that if I have the knowledge in case I need it. Geesh!!! What would be the point of this website if everyone knew it all?? Do ya'll get your rocks off by being smarter than everyone else?

natisha 04-25-2013 07:18 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Sahara (Post 2346929)
It is just frustrating to hear about stories where horses are put through hell at the expense of the owner's ignorance. People think having horses is easy peasy. It isn't. It requires hard work, knowledge, money, and management. You'd think more people would do a little homework and be proactive with horse care rather than reactive.

I feel the same way about barbed wire but people still use it.
Even well informed people can have a horse get laminitis & founder. I'm sure Secretariat had the best care & that's what ended his life.

People should ask questions if they are unsure. Heck, I know about grass safety & I still find myself calculating the risks of AM vs PM turnout & for how long.


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