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-   -   Bucks at a canter - advice? (http://www.horseforum.com/horse-riding/bucks-canter-advice-193106/)

twogeldings 05-14-2013 03:28 PM

Bucks at a canter - advice?
 
I'm unfortunately forced to sell Redman - not because he has issues, but because I have issues of my own! My joints have gotten to the point where just mounting up and SITTING has me barely able to walk for the rest of the day. Knees tender even to the touch, sore, stiff hip...I'm retired from riding at 20. It's carts only from here on out.

Now he hasn't been rode since last October, and last year he was only ridden lightly due to worsening joints. The year before that I was still feeling fine and we rode a lot. I know this horse like the back of my hand and not ONCE has he EVER thrown so much as a crowhop. In preparation for selling, I refreshed him on all aspects of groundwork and he was and is a perfect gentleman. Absolutely no complaints there, I'm extremely pleased with his ground manners. He's intelligent, responsive, and a pleasure to work with.

He walks, trots, and canters all tacked up just fine on a lunge line without a rider. His mouth his fine. His feet are beautiful. I've checked him over head to toe for any signs of soreness or other issues. None whatsoever.

Yesterday an experienced gentleman came out to work him undersaddle for me, so that I could update interested parties on his current attitude exactly. Red was extremely light and responsive, moved out perfectly at a walk, transitioned into his gait, and did another smooth, rolling transition into a canter...

And that's when the rodeo started. One moment, collected, in tune - the next moment, he's doing the equine version of 'twist and shout' and has the nerve to prance off looking pleased with himself after unseating the rider.

Twice he threw the guy off, and not after one buck, after a good deal of bucking - this guy has a great seat but it's only so long before your balance goes out the window. He's a horse rider, not a bronc rider, after all.
I checked everything, tack, horse, the pasture itself. I worked him into a good sweat - this horse did not ride out full of nervous energy by any means. Still, he starts bucking like he's never been ridden before in his life! W-T-H!

I'm about 5'5 and weigh roughly 145, the rider is about my height and maybe a few pounds heavier with muscle. So it's not at all like there's a sudden, massive difference in weight or height of the rider. The guy also doesn't wear spurs when he rides him, nor does he use a crop or whip. Just reins, saddle, horse. Same stuff I rode Red in without issue.


I'm frustrated because I can't ride Red myself and appalled and saddened by the horrible behavior. Right now it looks to be just sheer laziness - not wanting to really have to work like he used to and trying to discourage the rider so he can go back to eating and being dormant. Arg.


Does anyone have any advice on handling this? I can't be on him myself, so it's totally up to the rider who no matter how experienced, is still a total stranger to this horse. I'm going out soon to do groundwork groundwork groundwork and I'm going to have Red ridden on a long line first before letting him try going out on his own again today. No round pen (been wanting one for years) which is a definite handicap but I've worked a lazy, broncy horse out in that very pasture before and he turned out just fine in the end. That was back when I still could ride...unlike now.

I don't know how many times I apologized to the poor guy for it...it was so utterly unexpected.

waresbear 05-14-2013 03:34 PM

Sounds like a pain issue, I know you checked but a video would help to evaluate.
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Corporal 05-14-2013 03:37 PM

This horse is gonna hurt you, and you're not in a physical shape to ride through ANY bucking. I think he's sour and lazy. I also think he's green. A green horse can make good progress but after time off, you have to go back some steps when the training is picked up again. Only finished horses with thousands, read that again, THOUSANDS of hours under saddle can take time off and still be obedient and willing. I am sorry but you need to either pay to have him trained or sell him as is, and say some prayers.

twogeldings 05-14-2013 04:24 PM

I'll see if I can't dig up the ol' camera for some video. My phone battery likes to do the 'surprise death!' nowadays and I haven't had the time as of late to take it into the store and get a replacement.

Quote:

Originally Posted by Corporal (Post 2512794)
This horse is gonna hurt you, and you're not in a physical shape to ride through ANY bucking. I think he's sour and lazy. I also think he's green. A green horse can make good progress but after time off, you have to go back some steps when the training is picked up again. Only finished horses with thousands, read that again, THOUSANDS of hours under saddle can take time off and still be obedient and willing. I am sorry but you need to either pay to have him trained or sell him as is, and say some prayers.

I won't be riding - at all. Even the slightest mention of it would be met with an absolute No. Well, more than a no, more like an F-No. My dad allowed me to try him at a walk (no issues there) and I opted to dismount because of joint pain. He's excellent in all other aspects, just not at a canter. He doesn't try to plow his way to the fence to see the other horses or spook at his own shadow and responds to neck reining surprisingly well. Not perfect, but I certainly didn't have to worry about accidentally twisting my knees for cues.

I have a lady who is very interested in him and has extensive experience in training Arabians - she bred show horses before she retired and has dealt with bull-headed horses. She'd like to come out on Thursday this week to see him.

I've been extremely straightforward with her, made it very clear that he has NOT been ridden like he should and then got the winter off. I explained in full exactly how he behaved and what we did with his bucking episodes yesterday. I'll be updating her tonight on how he does.


I'll be speaking to a trainer who's very good on Wednesday - she's out of town but runs the sale at the local barn every week. I really think what Red needs is a solid slap upside the head in the form of patient, steady work and a calm, firm hand. Remember how you acted last year, Red? Obedient, willing, and trustworthy? I expect that from you now.


Horses. I swear. Wonderful animals, but boy they can be such derps.

Skyseternalangel 05-14-2013 06:00 PM

Get someone that is a qualified trainer to be on him. Figure out what is causing him to buck.. it could be behavioral or it may be a poor fitting saddle ?


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