The Horse Forum

The Horse Forum (/)
-   Horse Training (http://www.horseforum.com/horse-training/)
-   -   neck reining (http://www.horseforum.com/horse-training/neck-reining-19623/)

cheethamz17 12-22-2008 04:17 AM

neck reining
 
just wondering about neck reining and had a thought. if i cross the reins over his head instead of putting them over normally...if you get me and taught him to neck rein like that by putting pressure on his neck but pulling on the bit on the side i want to turn at the same time whether this would cause an issue...just wondered on peoples thoughts because to be honest its not easy to put hard pressure on his neck without pulling on the bit.

thanks

wild_spot 12-22-2008 04:46 AM

The problem with that is you won't be able to open your inside rein, which is a key component of teaching a horse to neck rein.

PaintHorseMares 12-22-2008 05:56 AM

Our young mares picked up neck reining very quickly by just using some inside leg at the same time or if they needed additional reinforcement, add a little direct rein with the inside rein.

iridehorses 12-22-2008 07:08 AM

The way I've taught horses to neck rein is to introduce neck pressure along with direct reining and my other aids and slowing move away from using a direct rein. Neck reining is not moving the rein across you horse's neck but rather just touching him with it without going across more then a inch or two. When starting a horse in neck reining I like to use a heavy set of wide reins so that there is a solid feel for my horse.

Your horse is moving off the pressure, or rather, the feel of the rein and your other aids. If you are moving your outside rein further then an inch or so beyond his neck then you are right - you will be confusing him by pulling his face in the opposite direction.

Remember to keep a loose rein so that when you lay the outside rein on his neck, you will not be affecting his face.

FGRanch 12-22-2008 07:55 AM

When you cross your reins like that it doesn't allow you to open up the inside rein, in doing so you free the shoulder up, which allows them to feel free to turn, which I believe is the key to neck reining.

GottaRide 12-22-2008 09:11 AM

Neck reining does not happen by just pulling on the reins a certain way. The horse needs to know what leg pressure is and how to respond to it. I like to call neck reining "leg steering" because that is a more appropriate term. The directional cues should come from your legs moreso than your reins.

DarkChylde 12-22-2008 10:49 AM

So you teach them direct rining before you teach them neck reining? I mean, when you are saddle breaking them. I know how to train a horse to direct rein, but not to neck rein so I don't know either, I am english goin western.

iridehorses 12-22-2008 11:28 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by DarkChylde (Post 215587)
So you teach them direct rining before you teach them neck reining? I mean, when you are saddle breaking them.

That's normal progression, Leigh. A horse needs to know how to turn before teaching them how to do it with indirect rein pressure.

My horses will turn with just weight and leg cues when we are out on the trail but for really quick turns and spins the added cue of a rein on their neck does it.

cheethamz17 12-23-2008 01:24 AM

well i tried it and he did well so...yeah not sure

Appyt 12-24-2008 10:21 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by DarkChylde (Post 215587)
So you teach them direct rining before you teach them neck reining? I mean, when you are saddle breaking them. I know how to train a horse to direct rein, but not to neck rein so I don't know either, I am english goin western.

Yes, After they know how to turn well w/direct rein and leg cues you can begin teaching them to turn with the neckrein cue. Some of it is body, that will be natural and doesn't need to be concentrated on other than to ride with focus. That means look where you want to go. Want to go straight, focus on a target in front of you. Want to turn change your focus to something in the direction you wish to ride toward. As you do this your body will naturally shift to help cue your horse. Now to the cues you will knowingly be giving. Start with the neck rein cue by laying the rein against the neck and look to the direction you wish to go. Then (IF NEEDED) give the leg cue that you have taught. If that doesnt get it, give the direct rein cue.

The trick is to always start with the "new" cue you are teaching, followed fairly quickly by a followup cue and lastly you use the cue you are not wanting to need to use at all. IE direct rein in this case.

Let us know how it goes.


All times are GMT -4. The time now is 03:06 AM.

Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.5
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Search Engine Friendly URLs by vBSEO 3.6.0