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-   -   Sidepull vs. Halter (http://www.horseforum.com/horse-training/sidepull-vs-halter-20189/)

saddleEMupCOWGURL 01-05-2009 08:40 PM

Sidepull vs. Halter
 
Ok- this may be an ignorant question but- I was going to invest in a side pull to assist me with the training of my 3yrs old mare. But then this man that is helping me stated that it's not necessary and that a halter and reins will do just fine... Should I side away from his advise and get a side pull or does he know what he's talking about?:-|

Zab 01-05-2009 08:44 PM

It depends. If you wanna teach your horse to bend and flex in the neck, sidepulls are more suited for that. But with a halter, it'll get more diffucult, on the other hand you can't cheat with it.

mlkarel2010 01-05-2009 08:49 PM

What all do you want to do with the side pull? If you don't want to do a lot a halter will work, but a sidepull was designed for this kind of work. A halter will twist and move around differently than a side pull. A side pull tends to give a clearer message

saddleEMupCOWGURL 01-05-2009 08:52 PM

i thought that a halter wouldn't give a real clear message but he said that her halter will tighten up to fit all the same... he's old and old fashion so maybe he's not familiar with the new training devices that are available now adays...

smrobs 01-06-2009 02:46 AM

Sometimes the oldest methods are best. I am not advocating that you stay with the halter but training in it is not that much different than training in anything else (including bitted bridles). You must still teach your horse to give her head in "this" direction when she feels pressure "here". If you have a regular nylon halter, you can hook the reins to the side d-rings and is easier to get your point across than if you have them hooked to the ring on the underside. However; if she does not tuck her nose and bend at the poll, when you apply pressure to stop her, the halter will slide farther up on her face and could create all new problems. I never saw the point of spending lots of money on something new when what you already have works just fine.......LOL but that may just be me.

mayfieldk 01-06-2009 02:54 AM

It's a lot easier to teach a horse to pull against your aids with a big fat nylon halter then it is something precise.
Keep the aids light with something that is a little more precise, and you'll never have to get 'loud' with your aids.

Jdun722 01-06-2009 04:29 PM

Use the halter. I think it would be wise to listen to his advice on that because I would suggest the halter also.

Zab 01-07-2009 02:32 PM

Somehow I thought it was a rope halter..
A normal halter with a tight fit might work, just avoid holding the preassure too much.

Midwest Paint 01-07-2009 02:58 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by smrobs (Post 222858)
Sometimes the oldest methods are best. I am not advocating that you stay with the halter but training in it is not that much different than training in anything else (including bitted bridles). You must still teach your horse to give her head in "this" direction when she feels pressure "here". If you have a regular nylon halter, you can hook the reins to the side d-rings and is easier to get your point across than if you have them hooked to the ring on the underside. However; if she does not tuck her nose and bend at the poll, when you apply pressure to stop her, the halter will slide farther up on her face and could create all new problems. I never saw the point of spending lots of money on something new when what you already have works just fine.......LOL but that may just be me.

Exaclty what she said.. You are teaching the basics, and any flexion you can teach and practice will be given even in a halter. A rope halter does work quite well, and better then a flat nylon for a vareity of reasons.

As for the finer cues, thats more of when bits step into play, but at that point a person should be past flexion exercises, and be working on specific tasks.

Cat 01-07-2009 03:23 PM

A side-pull is going to be stiffer and more precise for cues. This is actually important when you are first teaching a horse so they can learn easier and not confuse them. Its really hard to get a halter to fit and not twist. If you look at the side-pull design they usually have a couple extra short leather straps right at the nose peice that make a V shape coming off of the head-stall. That ads the stability that you just can't get in a standard halter.

Can you do it in a regular halter? Sure, probably. But its not going to be as percise and your horse could get frustrated and confused on the way. I say invest in the right tack and don't take short-cuts.


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