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-   -   How do you guys tie when on trails? (http://www.horseforum.com/trail-riding/how-do-you-guys-tie-when-202993/)

ponyluver420 05-30-2013 12:07 AM

How do you guys tie when on trails?
 
The title says it all, pretty much, but here's the long version:
Me and my friend like trail riding just for fun, and we do like, small picnics sometimes. We want our horses to enjoy themselves too, so we are trying to figure out how to go about grazing them. The first time, we held the horse's leads while we ate, but they kept on bothering us. The second time, we put baling twine on some trees and tied the horses to it, but we wanted the lead ropes tied long enough that the horses could graze, but not get their feet stuck. Neither of us could find a way to accomplish this, so the horses could kind of graze, but not much. We ended up not being able to just relax, because we kept looking at/checking on our horses to see if they were ok, happy, and we felt bad for them since they couldn't really do anything but sit and wait.
How to you guys recommend tying on our picnic rides? We have heard of picket lines, how to those work? We can't really afford anything expensive, we are teens, and have to pay for a lot of our extra equipment out of our own money, our parents just pay for the lease on our horses.
To cap it up: We need an inexpensive, efficient solution that works for the situation I described. Recommendations and examples of how you guys tie on trials/picnics when needed would be great, thanks in advance!

LesandLily 05-30-2013 12:38 AM

Typically we try to stop in areas of good grazing. Then we set ourselves up for lunch between where we came from and the horses. Than we just let th go. As they drift they tend to drift back the way they came from so they have to go through us to get home. Before doing this , be sure your horses are catchable and in a fairly remote area where they won't get spooked by dogs or other hikers. If not remote enough, I would either teach them to be hobbled or graze on a picket line. Both are inexpensive but better taught at home, not on the trail for the first time.
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ponyluver420 05-30-2013 12:44 AM

How would I go about teaching that?

TheOtherHorse 05-30-2013 04:59 AM

If we stop somewhere with good grass around, we hobble one and tie the other, just in case. I have trained my endurance horse to snack on grass along the trail without breaking stride when she is on a loose rein. She is not a greedy horse, so never rips the reins out of my hands, she only does it when I'm riding on the buckle, if I have her on contact she knows she can't graze. So, she is usually the one tied up since she has been snacking the whole time.

You can do a search for hobble training, it has been discussed before. Also, look for videos/articles from your favorite trainer/clinician about hobble training.

Painted Horse 05-30-2013 08:43 AM

It just depends on the day, If I know I'll be out long enough to want a lunch stop, I often bring the lead rope. With it I can tie to tree, or often I just let the horses drag the lead around. If I have a particularly energetic horse that I worry about, I have tied the lead to a large branch for him to drag, it seems to slow him down. But I wouldn't do that with a horse that is not used to dragging something behind them.

I often carry hobbles on my back cinch rings, Just let them hang during the ride, Pull them off at lunch and hobble the horses and let them graze while I eat lunch. I always keep them in sight, If they start to wander more than I like, I collect them and reposition them back in my vision. Horses in hobbles can run faster than I can.

Horses in hobbles grazing at lunch
http://i130.photobucket.com/albums/p...n/100_0047.jpg

http://i130.photobucket.com/albums/p...ware/Lunch.jpg

Any kind of camp, I set up a high line and tie my horses to that.
http://i130.photobucket.com/albums/p...rlsTrip554.jpg

I hobble them to graze and then back on the highline when they are not grazing or I'm not watching them
http://i130.photobucket.com/albums/p...rlsTrip253.jpg

LesandLily 05-30-2013 09:29 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by ponyluver420 (Post 2654033)
How would I go about teaching that?

There are lots of good videos on hobble training...I know Clinton Anderson has one but unless you are adept at training I would elicit the help of a local trainer who has done it before. They would probably trade the help for a few mucked stalls! :-) As far as teaching eating on picket line...I prefer a hoof picket but there is more training again and I prefer teaching it to a hobble broke horse. I would likely just teach them to eat off of a long light lead line tied to their halter. Drive or push a picket pin (could be a dog anchor, it's what I use just be sure there is a swivel on top to tie to) into the ground and tie their long lead rope to that. Once they are tied I like to lead them to the end of the line so they now there is resistance and if they are a good broke horse they will figure it out in a few minutes. Be sure to either drop your bridle or tie the reins behind the saddle horn so they don't get stepped on and broke (voice of experience here. :-) ). Now go enjoy your lunch just keeping an occasional eye on them to be sure they don't get tangled.

Cheers!
Les

Endiku 05-30-2013 01:30 PM

We hobble as well, since all of the horses on our farm are required to know how to tie solid and hobble before being allowed on long trail rides. Its not something for someone who has never hobbled before to teach themselves though, so I'd try to find a trainer to help you guys train your horses for hobbles and teach you how to apply them correctly.

Lindo and Venus 05-30-2013 07:55 PM

Not to like brag or anything, but my horses never wander more than 10metres from me. It took a few years training to accomplish this but once accomplished it feels so much better and relaxing for you not to be worried about them all the time. All of my horses are hobble trained, although I usually refuse to use them. Another easy solution is to just get a really long rope, and at a height just below the horses withers, tie the rope to a few trees, forming a type of fence, but just rope

ponyluver420 05-30-2013 11:58 PM

Ok! Thanks for al the suggestions, judging by some of the suggestions, we shouldn't worry too much about the horses stepping over the line. Maybe we will teach horses to ground-tie this summer! And we ride english, if this will have any impact on future replies! ;)

michaelvanessa 05-31-2013 12:18 AM

hobbleing
 
painted horse thoes pictures are awesome many thanks for shareing them.


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