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-   -   IDH in Hunters? (http://www.horseforum.com/hunters-hunter-seat-equitation/idh-hunters-220994/)

Hang on Fi 06-26-2013 06:19 PM

IDH in Hunters?
 
I'm kind of befuddled at the moment. Probably doesn't help that I've been struggling to keep my horses fit this year. Getting married complicates things when you're still trying to care for your blood family household too :lol: (In a good way, just busy)

How typical do you see Irish Draught's in Hunters? Fi isn't a flashy mover by any stretch, the mare would rather drag her hooves versus pick them up. The point she wears her toes flat for the farrier :-|. Which reminded of the "flat knee" terminology I have often heard in Hunters.

When I think Hunter's I think of the petite breeds of horses along with the riders, but shows how much I know ;)

I originally bought Fiona to do lower level eventing on, but she needs exposure and truthfully... I want to show some. I miss it. Not a ribbon chaser, but I miss the atmosphere. Probably because I can share the same passion as a lot of the folks there. I board at an old racing barn with no other riders.

Do you think Fi and I would have a shot in Hunter's or should I just keep my nose pointed at the lower level eventing?

I understand she probably would excel in=Dressage, but I really don't want to focus on that. I want to do "some" jumping with her as well. I also understand that Dressage really develops a nice rounded horse... but I just don't want to go that route right now.

The question stirred after sitting in on a Pony Hunter Show and just wanting to get out there and showing again, getting the exposure she very much needs at the very least.

updownrider 06-27-2013 10:37 PM

Without seeing Fi in a video it is hard to say how she would do as a hunter.

DressageIsToDance 06-28-2013 02:12 AM

Kind of depends on what level you want to compete at. We have had some big-boned warmbloods that nearly looked like drafts or draft crosses that were at our barn for resale at pretty high dollar and had nice show records.

So not all hunters are "petite". :)

As updownrider said, we really need a video, but if you are just wanting to do schooling, open, lower level stuff...ect...she would probably do fine. And honestly, if she were quiet and consistent in her movement, she might even beat out a better mover that weren't as quiet.

Hang on Fi 07-02-2013 05:19 PM

I thought about sharing the videos and I apologize for not doing so :)

She still has a lot to learn, but most of it is the intention to expose her. I just don't want to insult a judge by putting a horse in something they have no business being in to start with.

This was our last show earlier this year in a flat class.


upnover 07-02-2013 09:50 PM

What a cutie! Hunters are definitely not all little petite horses. In fact, what's in popular right now are bigger boned warmbloods rather then petite thoroughbreds, although what's truly important is a horse's way of going and that you nail down a nice course. At the lower levels you can get further away from the "ideal" if you can lay down a solid consistent trip. Is she the fanciest mover? Not really, but she's actually a lot cuter then a lot of draft types I've seen and I have shown worse movers. I think you should definitely aim for some hunter shows! They're a great place to start a green horse simply because the courses are easier and jumps are usually less intimidating. Go for it!

KWPNowner 07-03-2013 09:58 AM

She looks like a sweet girl! As others have said, it depends on what level of showing you're aiming to do. She's not an ideal hunter type, in movement or appearance, but at local/schooling shows, most horses aren't ideal hunter types and she would fit in fine. It's probably unlikely you'll win the hack, but if you can find eight distances and she'll stay consistent and get her changes, I think you two could get some ribbons over fences at local shows. :) I'd be concerned about her having the step to do hunters at rated shows, but the lines are usually set shorter at locals.

If you want to be competitive in the hunters, even at a local level, you may want to change how you show her, e.g. canter in a halfseat, work on becoming more consistent in the contact, etc. Some of this stuff would translate over to eventing (i.e., consistent in contact), but some of it would be a change, as all your dressage work would be ridden in a full seat. I'd be really clear about my goals for the hunter shows - is it a training experience for your mare? Are you going to show her to the best of her ability as a hunter? That would make a difference for me about how I approached the shows. If I were just taking her for experience, I may just ride the hack like a dressage test. If I were going to present her as a hunter, I'd give her a different ride. That's just something to consider when making plans for future shows. Good luck!

cakemom 07-03-2013 03:41 PM

Posted via Mobile Device

jaydee 07-03-2013 04:15 PM

She's like a dark version of my grey ID!!!
I struggle with the concept of the US hunter description because in the UK a hunter is a horse that has to look as if its going to stand up to a days fox hunting and the ID has been a horse that's always held its own in that. Because they can range in height from 15.2 upwards they usually stand out in the small hunter, middleweight and heavyweight show classes.
If you get them fit and trim they will jump really well and as they have power and a good length of stride they cope fine with dressage until you get into the higher levels where the warmbloods will always have the edge on most any other breeds
I think its worth putting in the effort.


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