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Baby Doll Amy 03-04-2009 04:06 AM

Big Jumper?
 
2 Attachment(s)
When sam goes, i will have to teach bomber a 17.3hh dressage thoroughbred how to jump, i am to small for him, but he is fairly safe to ride, i would like some info on how i can teach him how to jump, he is 11 years old, and here are some pics of him and me:-)

1dog3cats17rodents 03-04-2009 06:26 AM

Lots of lunging over jumps (in tack nce he gets the idea) free jumping is nice too. When you are riding him, do a ton of cavaletti work wtc (two point over the top), then once he's good with that, increase it to a tiny cavaleti and teach him to trot to it and canter away, and build it up from there.

MIEventer 03-04-2009 04:24 PM

You can send him to me, and I'd take the challange :)

Baby Doll Amy 03-06-2009 04:52 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by MIEventer (Post 264045)
You can send him to me, and I'd take the challange :)

lol hes not my horse but thanx anyway

Baby Doll Amy 03-06-2009 04:53 AM

thankx guys, ive been told to do the same thing i done on sam, and to be confident at what ever i am faced at and not to over face myself,

MIEventer 03-06-2009 10:13 AM

It isn't just about not overfacing yourself - you don't want to overface this horse.

Going with what you've already been suggested -

The horse has a weak topline and needs allot of work on that back end - jumping is dressage with speed bumps.

The thing with big horses such as this fellow, is that - they are allot tougher to manouver, allot more work to direct via seat, allot of time to tighten him up when riding through a tight course. Most courses at lower levels, are small and tight.

If his rider doesn't have the power and the know how - big horses can be allot more work. Trust me, I used to ride a 17.2hh Zangershiede - talk about allot of power, talk about allot of horse, talk about allot of animal to work under me. I had to learn to use allot of seat, allot of core and it took allot of time under saddle on the flat to reach the goal of having a light, manouverable horse under me - so that we could take that and apply it to a course successfully.

Big horses, are allot tougher to manouver through a course than a smaller, lighter horse.

This horse should be fine doing low levels - but he will need ALLOT of flat work under an educated rider, so that he can remain on his hind end, light and off of his forehand - to transfer that to a course, to remain light, soft and on his hind end. He needs a rider who can ride from his back end, leaving his front end alone - especially his face.

A horse this size, cannot be flat and heavy on his forehand. A horse this size needs a rider who can do this.

He needs a rider who can support him constantly, to the fence, over the fence and after the fence - keeping his back lifted and light.

Educated Flat work, Educated flat work, Educated flat work

Stepher 03-10-2009 09:55 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by MIEventer (Post 265128)
It isn't just about not overfacing yourself - you don't want to overface this horse.

Going with what you've already been suggested -

The horse has a weak topline and needs allot of work on that back end - jumping is dressage with speed bumps.

The thing with big horses such as this fellow, is that - they are allot tougher to manouver, allot more work to direct via seat, allot of time to tighten him up when riding through a tight course. Most courses at lower levels, are small and tight.

If his rider doesn't have the power and the know how - big horses can be allot more work. Trust me, I used to ride a 17.2hh Zangershiede - talk about allot of power, talk about allot of horse, talk about allot of animal to work under me. I had to learn to use allot of seat, allot of core and it took allot of time under saddle on the flat to reach the goal of having a light, manouverable horse under me - so that we could take that and apply it to a course successfully.

Big horses, are allot tougher to manouver through a course than a smaller, lighter horse.

This horse should be fine doing low levels - but he will need ALLOT of flat work under an educated rider, so that he can remain on his hind end, light and off of his forehand - to transfer that to a course, to remain light, soft and on his hind end. He needs a rider who can ride from his back end, leaving his front end alone - especially his face.

A horse this size, cannot be flat and heavy on his forehand. A horse this size needs a rider who can do this.

He needs a rider who can support him constantly, to the fence, over the fence and after the fence - keeping his back lifted and light.

Educated Flat work, Educated flat work, Educated flat work


Well said. I agree 100%. He definitly needs lots of flat work before you start jumping him anything above a crossrail.

Hillviewfarm 03-12-2009 03:50 PM

No rider is to small for a horse! ;)
lol
I agree with the post above

xpyrrohs 03-14-2009 11:54 PM

I agree with above posters. Pyro is luckily a fast learner, so I only had to lunge him for about 2 weeks over jumps until he got the idea of curling up his legs and actually jumping. Do lots of trot-pole work... and NEVER jump for the first time under saddle over a vertical. Use a cross rail(I learned the that hard way -.-) because it looks more inviting to him. You have to build up HIS confidence before you move on to higher jumps, if you mess it up now, its going to be SO hard to correct later on. Until he is confident, you should not move on to higher jumps.

Baby Doll Amy 03-19-2009 03:11 AM

thanx for helping guys he is improving well


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