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littrella 07-27-2013 11:16 AM

hitching to drag
 
Today I am picking up some old motorcycle tires to get Danee started on dragging some weight. Looking at different driving forums, I've seen a lot of different things on how to hitch to a drag. What does everyone on here sugest?

greentree 07-27-2013 11:46 AM

I use big screw eyes with a washer inside in the tire, then a sturdy snap or caribeener on the end of a rope which is attached to the trace. You want those tires WAY behind the hind feet, so that if there is a blow-up, someone can safely detach them.

We use a big, fat cotton rope, about 25 ft, wrapped through the bridle around the nose for a helper to hold, because the driver has enough to mess with, and the helper can pull a panicing animal off balance a bit, if needed. We use this all the way through first carriage hitch-up.

Say whoa immediately after the first step they take with the weight, and that way they learn stop is the release, not run.

Remember to have a helper that won't panic if something goes wrong. if anyone panics, quit immediately, and find someone else.


Nancy

Taffy Clayton 07-27-2013 01:13 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by greentree (Post 3179057)
I use big screw eyes with a washer inside in the tire, then a sturdy snap or caribeener on the end of a rope which is attached to the trace. You want those tires WAY behind the hind feet, so that if there is a blow-up, someone can safely detach them.

We use a big, fat cotton rope, about 25 ft, wrapped through the bridle around the nose for a helper to hold, because the driver has enough to mess with, and the helper can pull a panicing animal off balance a bit, if needed. We use this all the way through first carriage hitch-up.

Say whoa immediately after the first step they take with the weight, and that way they learn stop is the release, not run.

Remember to have a helper that won't panic if something goes wrong. if anyone panics, quit immediately, and find someone else.


Nancy



Great recommendations Greentree!!

I really like the whoa after the first step.

Saddlebag 07-27-2013 07:46 PM

I built a travois with a wide piece of plywood across near the bottom. Not so wide the horse's heels would clip it. This mimics shafts and the horse feels some weight as the ends drag on the ground. I could hook a tire on for more drag. It was made of small poplar trees so if it broke, oh well, there were plenty more.

littrella 07-27-2013 11:22 PM

Tires picked up - Check
180lb para cord - check
eye bolts - check
225lb caribeener clips - check
Time to get everything to the farm & attempt hitch - FAIL!!!

Taffy Clayton 07-27-2013 11:25 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by littrella (Post 3183425)
Tires picked up - Check
180lb para cord - check
eye bolts - check
225lb caribeener clips - check
Time to get everything to the farm & attempt hitch - FAIL!!!

Take lots of photos please!

greentree 07-28-2013 08:18 AM

littrella, LOL!! I have 2 almost ready to go.....same scenario!!

Nancy

GreySorrel 07-28-2013 11:43 AM

Depending on how heavy the tire is or where you are, I would hesitate to say whoa after the first step. When a horse starts to go, that momentum is what moves that tire, so they need to keep moving forward to keep the object behind them moving. Watch your horses body language, their ears, etc.

When I used my Percheron mare Trixie to move a decent sized tree trunk, I used her by herself instead of with her team mate Smoke. When Trixie got to the end of the traces and felt the weight, she stopped and took a step back. Once I reassured her it was okay and flicked the lines, she put her weight into it and moved it the 6ft I wanted it moved to. If I had stopped her after the first step, she would of only been more confused.

Personally, if you trust your horse to listen and they do not look panicky or upset, let them move a few steps before asking for a whoa. Praise them and then start up again. I have used our draft team for MANY around the farm chores and this has always worked well for us. I don't often use Trixie alone as much as I do Smoke, as she has not had the experience moving things around by herself as her team mate has.

littrella 07-29-2013 12:08 AM

Sucess!!
 
3 Attachment(s)
He hesatated for all of about 30 seconds, I told him, "walk on, you can do this" & away we went!!!!! We even stoped for some kids to come pet us. Just as calm as could be. I don't think I could be more in love with this little long ears of mine!!!!!!

GreySorrel 07-29-2013 08:02 AM

Oh he is adorable, I can see why people and children would want to stop and pet him, I sure would love to snuggle up and love on him myself! You look very good and confident in what your doing. LOVE the photo's.


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