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-   -   The Action on this bit? (http://www.horseforum.com/horse-tack-equipment/action-bit-244618/)

Spellcheck 07-30-2013 05:17 PM

The Action on this bit?
 
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While going through my tack shed I came across a bit that I guess someone must have left there and, since I happen to be short a bit anyway, thought I might as well put it to use.

I looked at other bits online to find out what kind it was and it matches this one almost exactly:

http://www.horseforum.com/attachment...1&d=1375218459

Anyway, on to my question, I need to know how to set it up (I noticed it doesn't have a place for a curb strap.) and what kind of action it has. I looked online but couldn't find anyone who explained it.
I've used Tomb Thumb and similar bits before too.

If anyone could tell me themselves or provide a link that would be great :)

Thanks!

Muppetgirl 07-30-2013 05:23 PM

Argentine dogbone snaffle......it's not a snaffle but is advertised as one. Can't find a good link right now sorry:-(. Wifi is down and it's slooooooooow:evil:

Allison Finch 07-30-2013 05:44 PM

I, personally, don't like broken mouth curb bits. At least, with the central link on the mouth, it will not have the "nutcracker" effect as badly.

COWCHICK77 07-30-2013 05:57 PM

You would attach the curb strap on the same rings as the headstall.

Given the shape of the shanks I would guess it not to be very well balanced and hardly any pre-signal, much like a Tom Thumb.

EdmontonHorseGal 07-30-2013 05:58 PM

i would assume the curb strap attaches to the same ring as the headstall.

as for the exact name of the bit, i couldn't tell you. but it does look to have a 'dogbone' style joint in the middle, i think that is what that is called. hopefully someone with more knowledge on western curbs will be along soon to give more info.

Cynical25 08-01-2013 11:06 AM

I've always know it as a tear drop shank snaffle which, of course, will make people scream "it isn't a snaffle because it has shanks!"

Semantics aside, we used it to transition our western colts from the true snaffle to a shanked bit. We'd start with no curb strap, just to get the colt acclimated to some poll pressure and the low-leverage curved shank. After a ride or two, we'd add a the curb strap to the same ring as the headstall and then let the colt get acclimated to the new jaw pressure. The horse should already mostly know how to neckrein by this time, but this was considered to be milder than a longer shanked curb if we did need to take a hold of him during training.

Spellcheck 08-01-2013 06:30 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Cynical25 (Post 3225730)
I've always know it as a tear drop shank snaffle which, of course, will make people scream "it isn't a snaffle because it has shanks!"

Semantics aside, we used it to transition our western colts from the true snaffle to a shanked bit. We'd start with no curb strap, just to get the colt acclimated to some poll pressure and the low-leverage curved shank. After a ride or two, we'd add a the curb strap to the same ring as the headstall and then let the colt get acclimated to the new jaw pressure. The horse should already mostly know how to neckrein by this time, but this was considered to be milder than a longer shanked curb if we did need to take a hold of him during training.



Thanks, that helped a lot!

The horse I plan to use it on is my 3 1-2 yr old mare that can actualy ride bridle-less off pure leg pressure and a little mane (when she feels like it :-P) But otherwise neckreins flawlessly.


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