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-   -   Back hoof clunking into front hoof...? (http://www.horseforum.com/horse-health/back-hoof-clunking-into-front-hoof-26780/)

twogeldings 04-25-2009 11:16 PM

Back hoof clunking into front hoof...?
 
Sammy has a BIG stride, it's sometimes hard to keep up with even if he's going slow. But today I was bringing him in from the pasture to put him in the paddock and noticed (also heard) his left back hoof clunking into the bottom of his front hoof. :shock:

I've never seen this happen before. Is soreness a possibility? He cantered/bucked/trotted a LOT today (Loki really hyped him up -eyeroll-). Normally he just putters along at a walk, but he was really working it today. Cantering from one side of the pasture to the other (it's 5 acres), trotting after Loki, kicking at Loki with the back hooves because Loki kept nipping on his rump, bucking and jumping just because the weathers fine, the grass is green, and those are three geldings feeling darned full of themselves.

Heck, I don't even work him that much. 15 minuets at a walk, plus a minuet of trot in either direction on the lunge and thats it. I do that once a week, if. Just for the heck of it really.


I did observe him at a stand and at a walk. Both appeared normal. I didn't hear anymore clicking (hooves hitting together) maybe 15 minuets later when I called him over in the paddock. He was standing around in the standard position, at ease, slightly parked out in the back.


Ideas...? O-o He is shod, but everything's normal. No loose shoes or hooves in need of trimming.

riccil0ve 04-25-2009 11:23 PM

He is probably just really reaching under himself when he moves. I knew a lot of horses that did this, so we just put bell boots on them to protect them from injuring the front heel bulb. You can turn out in them too, although he'll probably kick them off if he is that active. =]

Jubilee Rose 04-25-2009 11:28 PM

I agree with riccilove, he's probably really extending. I'm not sure why some horses so this, but I'd suggest putting on front boots or bell boots to keep him from hurting himself.

Countrygal892000 04-25-2009 11:30 PM

If he is recently shod check his shoes to make sure his front shoes are not too long he may be clicking because of that... he may have changed his gate due to soreness and it made him click

Spyder 04-25-2009 11:37 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by twogeldings (Post 295986)
Sammy has a BIG stride, it's sometimes hard to keep up with even if he's going slow. But today I was bringing him in from the pasture to put him in the paddock and noticed (also heard) his left back hoof clunking into the bottom of his front hoof. :shock:

I've never seen this happen before. Is soreness a possibility? He cantered/bucked/trotted a LOT today (Loki really hyped him up -eyeroll-). Normally he just putters along at a walk, but he was really working it today. Cantering from one side of the pasture to the other (it's 5 acres), trotting after Loki, kicking at Loki with the back hooves because Loki kept nipping on his rump, bucking and jumping just because the weathers fine, the grass is green, and those are three geldings feeling darned full of themselves.

Heck, I don't even work him that much. 15 minuets at a walk, plus a minuet of trot in either direction on the lunge and thats it. I do that once a week, if. Just for the heck of it really.


I did observe him at a stand and at a walk. Both appeared normal. I didn't hear anymore clicking (hooves hitting together) maybe 15 minuets later when I called him over in the paddock. He was standing around in the standard position, at ease, slightly parked out in the back.


Ideas...? O-o He is shod, but everything's normal. No loose shoes or hooves in need of trimming.


It is called forging and is the result of the front leg not breaking over fast enough. Young unbalanced horses will forge also.

Usual fix is to have the front hoof toe rolled (if no shoes) or have the shoes themselves rolled so the toe breaks over and leaves the ground faster therefore allowing the hind foot a spot to put that foot.

Another possible fix is to set the rear shoes slightly back but that is done usually only when all other fixes fail.

luvs2ride1979 04-26-2009 12:40 AM

If he's barefoot, have the front toes taken back shorter, so the front feet roll over and take off quicker. He could have some heel imbalance too.


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