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KylieHuitema 09-15-2013 12:30 AM

-Warning- Inexperienced with the draft variety
 
Second thread of the night :lol: I browse dreamhorse.. Way too much.. And I may have fallen in love with my first draft cross... And I want to go see him and just be able to look at him.. :rofl:

He is a beautiful friesan x shire yearling. He is already huge and has feathering and ahhhh. I usually don't really like big drafts since I am an arab person, but this one got me.

So here comes the question, has anyone trained a shire cross or friesan cross to jump/event/dressage and actually have success? Here he is -crossing my fingers the link works- http://www.dreamhorse.com/photos/jul/1882430.jpg

Also, would he be a smaller draft when growing, or will he be HUGE?

stevenson 09-15-2013 01:18 AM

probably be pretty big .

DraftyAiresMum 09-15-2013 02:54 AM

He'll probably end up 16hh+, maybe even over 17hh.

Personally, I wouldn't look at a friesian/shire cross simply because neither breed is known for their smooth gaits as riding horses. Friesian are VERY up-and-down in their movement, and shires are closely related to Clydesdales and gave the same big, floaty trot. Now, I'd take a shire's trot over a friesian's trot any day of the week, but I just don't see the mix making a good jumper or eventer. It might be okay for low level dressage, but eh.

If I were going to go with a draft cross for eventing, I'd look at something like a TB crossed with a draft or even a stock horse (QH or paint) crossed with a draft, like my guy. The TB/stock horse smooths out the bouncy, lofty gaits of the draft, while the draft imparts bone and substance. Also, judging the individual horse's conformation before the breed/cross is essential.

Honestly, it's a poor picture, but I'm not really seeing anything in that guy that I like.
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Clava 09-15-2013 02:58 AM

Not my cup of tea and not something I would expect to jump well.

jumanji321 09-15-2013 03:20 AM

Even though he is just a yearling, his hind-end does not say jumper to me. He will probably end up being too heavy to jump higher and do it successfully.

KylieHuitema 09-15-2013 08:32 AM

Okay, no-go the. What cross with a draft would give me a lighter horse but still the power. I've seen TBxDrafts and then there is the wamblood varieties I have heard of. What would you guy recommend?

tlkng1 09-15-2013 08:44 AM

Friesians themselves are breaking more and more into the dressage world and some Shire crosses, and even full shires, depending upon build, are also doing dressage work. General comments from dressage judges for which I have scribed are that Friesians are hard to get to lengthen..they tend to just get faster, however, under proper training they can do the work.

This particular trainer (and FEI rider) is known for his work with Friesians and does a very good job.

Mendoza Dressage


There is no doubt, however, the Friesians and Shires are BIG horses.

DraftyAiresMum 09-15-2013 11:58 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by KylieHuitema (Post 3636833)
Okay, no-go the. What cross with a draft would give me a lighter horse but still the power. I've seen TBxDrafts and then there is the wamblood varieties I have heard of. What would you guy recommend?

If it were me, I'd look at a Percheron or Belgian crossed with a TB or stock horse (QH or paint). IME, the Percherons and Belgians tend to have a flatter gait than the shires, Clydes and friesians. My Percheron/paint cross has gorgeous, easy-to-ride gaits, including an extended trot that is like glass (no bounce at all). In fact, his trot (when he finds the right one lol) is so smooth that it almost feels like riding a gaited horse. I have seen some nice TB/Clyde crosses that seem to do well with jumping and dressage, though.

What you need to look for is a horse with a powerful hind end that can propel itself over jumps and get under itself and using that hind end for dressage.

Not sure what you mean by "the warmblood varieties."
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KylieHuitema 09-15-2013 12:04 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by DraftyAiresMum (Post 3637553)
If it were me, I'd look at a Percheron or Belgian crossed with a TB or stock horse (QH or paint). IME, the Percherons and Belgians tend to have a flatter gait than the shires, Clydes and friesians. My Percheron/paint cross has gorgeous, easy-to-ride gaits, including an extended trot that is like glass (no bounce at all). In fact, his trot (when he finds the right one lol) is so smooth that it almost feels like riding a gaited horse. I have seen some nice TB/Clyde crosses that seem to do well with jumping and dressage, though.

What you need to look for is a horse with a powerful hind end that can propel itself over jumps and get under itself and using that hind end for dressage.

Not sure what you mean by "the warmblood varieties."
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Like a beglian warmblood
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DraftyAiresMum 09-15-2013 12:16 PM

Ah. Ok. Thought maybe you meant like an American warmblood, which is a type, not a breed (they register a lot of draft crosses as "American warmbloods").

If you can afford a true warmblood, go for it. They are bred for jumping and dressage...and usually come with a price tag to match (haven't seen many in my area under $7,000...I live in cowboy country and a spectacular roping horse that heads, heels, and is a money-earner consistently goes for less than $6,000). If you're on a budget, a good draft cross is a "poor man's warmblood," if you look at conformation before you say "Oooo! Pretty horsy!! Me want!" *grabby hands*
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