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-   -   2 trailer questions and 1 truck question (http://www.horseforum.com/horse-trailers/2-trailer-questions-1-truck-question-281058/)

DancingArabian 09-21-2013 10:24 PM

2 trailer questions and 1 truck question
 
If it matters, my trailer is an ancient Kingston steel trailer, 2 horse bumper pull with dressing room.

My trailer has these cushioned pads on the inside. I'm guessing they're bumper pads? They are on the wall, divider and rear door - presumably to give the horse something pliable to bounce against. The "bumper pads" or cushions or whatever they are called are old and cruddy looking, so I would like to replace them. Is this something you can buy, or have to make, or what? How do you replace them?

The rear door of my trailer is divided into three parts (top, middle, bottom). The middle part has that cushion on it, but it looks like it's a piece of wood set inside a metal frame. The wood is starting to rot so I need to somehow take it out and replace the wood, then the cushion. How on earth do I do that? I didn't see a way to open the frame up to remove the wood - it looks welded shut.


My truck is a 2003 Ford F250, 5.4L V8 gas engine. It has just over 119k miles on it. I've had it for about a year and a half. It was my primary driving vehicle (about 20-30 miles per day) up until early August when I got a job in the next city over. Since a 40 minute commute in a huge truck is less than ideal, I bought a put-put commuter car that gets me about 40 mpg (A Ford Focus if anyone is curious). ANYWAY, I do not want to sell the truck. I know there's no such thing as a "forever truck" but I would like this to be my "for a really long time truck". I use my Focus as my primary vehicle now. The truck sits largely unused, but I make sure to drive it at least 1-2x per week. Is there anything that I should do to make sure that the truck doesn't fall apart from lack of use? I know vehicles can 'suffer' from just sitting and I really love this truck.

Chevaux 09-21-2013 11:06 PM

Re truck: If you store it inside; use it periodically; pay close attention to various fluid levels, condition of belts, etc. you should be able to keep it for quite awhile. I have a 92 Jeep Cherokee that I bought new and still have - it's used like you want to use your truck (every so often) and runs like a charm although I see I'm going to have rust problems on the body. I've known car enthusiasts keep some of their vehicles for many, many years but it costs them to do so and if they didn't do the work themselves it would probably break the bank keeping up to their standard.

Re trailer: If you had pictures that would be helpful. I suspect you can take the padding off and when you do so you will find it rough or unfinished behind it. Therefore you will have to do a bit of work on those spots if you decided to not replace them. You can make your own padding (get material from stores that sell furniture upholstery type material) but it might be easier if you look at replacing the spots with rubber matting - that could probably be glued (construction grade adhesive) and screwed on. With regard to that wood - it could well have been put in place while the frame was only partly done then welded over. You might be able to bust up the wood and pull it out by using chisels and a pry bar. It likely should be replaced though as it may be necessary for structural integrity (photos would really help). The only way I can think of replacing the wood if you don't have access to a welder would be similar to how you would replace flooring - create individual panels (rather than one big piece) and work each of the panels in place and that could be tricky.

DancingArabian 09-21-2013 11:25 PM

Thank you Chevaux!

Unfortunately, I live on a military base so I only have outdoor parking. I'm not opposed to getting a giant cover or something for it if that would help though.

I will try to grab some pictures but it probably won't be until Monday. I don't think I can get to the barn tomorrow during daytime hours.

Chevaux 09-21-2013 11:32 PM

What's your climate like where you are? I'm in Canada and snow can be a real nuisance for outside vehicles as it gets blown into cracks and crevices, stays there until the weather warms up and then starts melting which in turn starts rusting and general degeneration problems.

AQHSam 09-21-2013 11:52 PM

i had a minivan I had used when showing dogs that I didn't want to give up after I retired my last dog. I parked it at a friend's house. it literally fell apart within a single year. the costs associated with repairing it were greater than the value so I donated it to a local charity. cables deteriorated, it was a mess. But, I did not use it enough. You need to drive it at least once a week for more than 10 miles. Put some mileage on it. If I could do it all over again, I would have driven it every tuesday morning - night. take it to work. to the stores...

If you can afford to put the gas in it to take it to work once a week, that will help. But just driving it around the block or to the market and back in 2 miles won't be enough.

I would say, for every week it sits without use, drive it one day. If you don't drive it for 6 weeks straight, drive it for 6 days straight. i believe my problem was a) short trips and b) too infrequent use for the short trips.

DancingArabian 09-22-2013 12:30 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Chevaux (Post 3694754)
What's your climate like where you are? I'm in Canada and snow can be a real nuisance for outside vehicles as it gets blown into cracks and crevices, stays there until the weather warms up and then starts melting which in turn starts rusting and general degeneration problems.

We usually don't get much snow where we are. I say usually because one year about three years ago we had a Snowpocalypse. Snow was piled up 4 and 5 feet in places! I would use it a lot more in the winter.
Posted via Mobile Device

DancingArabian 09-22-2013 12:37 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by AQHSam (Post 3694874)
i had a minivan I had used when showing dogs that I didn't want to give up after I retired my last dog. I parked it at a friend's house. it literally fell apart within a single year. the costs associated with repairing it were greater than the value so I donated it to a local charity. cables deteriorated, it was a mess. But, I did not use it enough. You need to drive it at least once a week for more than 10 miles. Put some mileage on it. If I could do it all over again, I would have driven it every tuesday morning - night. take it to work. to the stores...

If you can afford to put the gas in it to take it to work once a week, that will help. But just driving it around the block or to the market and back in 2 miles won't be enough.

I would say, for every week it sits without use, drive it one day. If you don't drive it for 6 weeks straight, drive it for 6 days straight. i believe my problem was a) short trips and b) too infrequent use for the short trips.

I've been using it to get to the barn and back on the weekends (about 20 miles round trip). I will start trying to use it more then. I ran the figures and using it for one full work day would cost me about $30 in gas - ouch!!
Posted via Mobile Device

churumbeque 09-22-2013 03:38 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by DancingArabian (Post 3694690)
Thank you Chevaux!

Unfortunately, I live on a military base so I only have outdoor parking. I'm not opposed to getting a giant cover or something for it if that would help though.

I will try to grab some pictures but it probably won't be until Monday. I don't think I can get to the barn tomorrow during daytime hours.

If you want the pads to be nice I would go to an upholsterer and have them made. A furniture or auto restoration upholsterer would be able to do them. I would not tarp a vehicle myself. It can hold in moisture and the wind can cause rub marks. I would just do what you are doing and drive it regularly and keep it maintained.

horselovinguy 10-04-2013 12:51 PM

New to the forum but thought I could add...

Your truck, drive it at least one day a week, faithfully every week.
Keep it waxed and clean, gas full and put a stabilizer in it will help it not deteriorate or break down in the tank. Can of dry gas added as you get to the gas station will help also to diminish condensation that can and will occur from just sitting and temperature fluctuations.
Don't cover the truck outside but do put up a sun shade to help reduce sun damage to the interior.
You can strategically place moth balls under the hood, in the bed to discourage mice from making their winter home in it.:shock:

As for your Kingston trailer...great quality manufactured trailers.
Kingston is still in business. You can order replacement pads from them directly that will fit correctly and be of the right foam and heavy vinyl material probably for about the cost of going custom or even cheaper.
I'm scratching my head with your description of your rear doors. I know Kingston trailers well, hauled many a mile with them.
Rear is usually a ramp load with barn doors to close them in or a roll-down tarp to keep weather out.
I have also seen ramp, 2 barn doors where horses load and then 2 top doors...
However, with your description of decrepit wood makes me think a ramp with missing matting on top...
Or you have a center divider that goes to the floor with padding on and across the top hanging own about 6 inches both sides...with butt bars that are not usually padded due to fecal matter on them (:-x having to touch that all the time!) You don't usually have a center bar permanent but a sliding center divider...at least all of the trailers I dealt with...

As others stated pictures would really help as actually knowing the trailers... I can't figure out what you are really referring to either...:think:


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