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-   -   Critique my jumping position... (http://www.horseforum.com/horse-riding-critique/critique-my-jumping-position-28149/)

Supermane 05-20-2009 10:45 PM

Critique my jumping position...
 
Okay, I've never asked this before because I've never really had ones that could be critiqued before and I know my jump position is not the best. Don't be too harsh... this is me last Sunday doing very small jumps. I see a few things, but I want to hear your opinions and how I can improve.

This is not my horse so please do not critique her.

http://i296.photobucket.com/albums/m...0141_30258.jpg

http://i296.photobucket.com/albums/m...0141_30258.jpg

http://i296.photobucket.com/albums/m...0141_30258.jpg

http://i296.photobucket.com/albums/m...0141_30258.jpg

MIEventer 05-20-2009 11:00 PM

You have a very nice, solid leg. I love that you allow your heels to do their job, which is anchor you in your tack. Your leather are at a perfect length for you, you have stabillity and are more than capeable of supporting your upper body with your lower.

Your seat is exactly where it should be. Low to your tack, and over the center of your saddle. You allowed your horse to lift you out of your tack, instead of you thrusting yourself out and forward.

You have a great back, love that you are looking up and you are with your horses motion.

The only issue is, you are over using your upper body, drastically. The only time we should see a rider with that cosed of an upper body, is when we are seeing riders doing 4'0" or bigger.

A rider should allow their horse to close the angle for them, instead of collapsing their upper bodies so drastically. Your hip angle should be much more open than that.

You definately do not need to be using your horse as a crutch for balance - you clearly can support your upper body on your own, via lower leg stabillity - stop relying on your horse, and don't fall into the pitfall of being a percher/poser over fences.

You also should be working on the automatic release. George Morris rants about this often, he created the Crest Release only for beginner riders - riders who cannot support their upper bodies with their lower, so that they don't interfear with their horses job over the fence.

Challange yourself and break yourself out of this habit.

Here is a critique that GM gave in one of the PH magazines you might find intersting:

http://www.horseforum.com/jumping/fo...-fences-26333/

Supermane 05-21-2009 12:04 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by MIEventer (Post 311127)
You have a very nice, solid leg. I love that you allow your heels to do their job, which is anchor you in your tack. Your leather are at a perfect length for you, you have stabillity and are more than capeable of supporting your upper body with your lower.

Your seat is exactly where it should be. Low to your tack, and over the center of your saddle. You allowed your horse to lift you out of your tack, instead of you thrusting yourself out and forward.

You have a great back, love that you are looking up and you are with your horses motion.

The only issue is, you are over using your upper body, drastically. The only time we should see a rider with that cosed of an upper body, is when we are seeing riders doing 4'0" or bigger.

A rider should allow their horse to close the angle for them, instead of collapsing their upper bodies so drastically. Your hip angle should be much more open than that.

You definately do not need to be using your horse as a crutch for balance - you clearly can support your upper body on your own, via lower leg stabillity - stop relying on your horse, and don't fall into the pitfall of being a percher/poser over fences.

You also should be working on the automatic release. George Morris rants about this often, he created the Crest Release only for beginner riders - riders who cannot support their upper bodies with their lower, so that they don't interfear with their horses job over the fence.

Challange yourself and break yourself out of this habit.

Here is a critique that GM gave in one of the PH magazines you might find intersting:

http://www.horseforum.com/jumping/fo...-fences-26333/

Thank you for such an in-depth analysis of my position. I really wasn't expecting that. I know I bend over too much am trying to fix that (my trainer is constantly yelling at me for it too). Actually, the horse I'm currently riding is helping with that a lot... if I go down too far get whacked in the face with his neck. I actually have begun doing automatic releases, but they aren't pictured.

lovemyponies 05-21-2009 08:05 AM

supermane, be careful it can be very dangerous to get wacked in the face! One of my friends riding my horse did the same thing you are doing and the horse jumped really big and she got wacked and it stunned her and knocked her out and she fell off. She was okay but could be really dangerous.. LOL ought to be good movtivation to stop doing it.

But you have a great position other than that. LOVE your leg position!

ridingismylife2 05-21-2009 08:34 AM

I've been wacked in the face when a horse refused and jumped all of a sudden and **** it hurt! xD I was so sure that my nose broke but thankfully it didn't.

Ur form is really good except the collapsed body over the neck :)

MIEventer 05-21-2009 11:18 AM

What I would highly suggest, is going on the lunge line to aid you in correcting your over active upper body.

I'll tell you why - because then you can learn to feel your horses rhythm and movement, learn to trust your horses rhtyhm and movement - and learn to trust your horse to do his job.

If you go on the lunge with no reins, start from the ground up. The no reins - why no reins? Because now you have to focus on your seat and legs.

Learn to feel your horses rhtyhm with your eyes closed, when you achive that feeling, then incorporate that over small x rails or cavaletti's.

Sit, sit, sit - wait, wait, wait - feel, feel, feel - allow your horse to come up to you.

When you achieve that, then incorporate that over larger fences.

Eventually you will beable to sit and wait and allow your horse to come up to you.

Supermane 05-21-2009 04:05 PM

I actually always close my eyes over fences (I guess you can't really see in the pictures). My teacher tells me to treat the jump like a speed bump.

Thanks for the comments everyone. Other than my collapsed body and lack of automatic release is there anything else you see?

MIEventer 05-21-2009 09:24 PM

I think you look fabulous :)

lovemyponies 05-22-2009 01:29 PM

yes other than what was already noted I think you are doing great!

Ace164 10-14-2013 11:26 PM

looks pretty good! I agree, work on opening your hip angle and getting an automatic release. Your leg looks good, your heels look really good (i'm jealous (; haha). You could try practicing holding the reins like a wheelbarrow when you release over the jump. This can help you achieve the automatic release. I think Horse Illustrated did an article on it. Good job! (:


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