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ForeverSunRider 09-24-2013 12:33 PM

Horse for a beginner
 
Hello lovely ladies and gents of the horse world,

My sister is 12 years old and she has recently decided she wants to take up horseback riding.

She's been taking lessons since July, so not very long, but if we did bring another horse into our barn it would get plenty of use so we're kind of in the market for one. I say kind of because my mom is just kind of looking - nothing majorly serious.

However, we've never really gone out and bought a horse. They've all just fallen into our lap so to speak. We've gotten our horses either for dirt cheap from friends, or for free as rescues from abuse situations or just because their owner didn't have time for them any more.

We almost got another rescue yesterday, but we were able to contact the horse's original owners and they took him back.

Any breeds known to have less of a temper than others? She is not very skilled so we already know she'll need a dead broke, older, patient horse for her to learn on. And we're not thinking of buying a pony.

We both have the majority of our experience with Quarter Horses, Palominos, Arabians, and Thoroughbreds. We'd lean more toward these breeds because we know them.

We'd buy another horse with the temperaments of our horses, but they're both a bit flighty and that's not what she needs.

So, any breeds you can think of off the top of your heads that are known to be good starter horses (with correct training, of course) and tend to be reasonably priced?

If she had her way, my sister would love a leopard app. Anyone know anything about those?

Corporal 09-24-2013 12:44 PM

There is NO breed that makes a good beginner horse. Only good breeding, good handling (so as not to ruin a)/and a good temperament, and EXCELLENT and YEARS of training create a good beginner's horse.
The price doesn't indicate a good beginner's horse. Often they are $undervalued, but every babysitter horse I've owned was worth his or her weight in gold, IN MY OPINION!!!
I suggest you start looking into trainers. THEY have clientele who buy and sell and often a good local trainer will KNOW of a middle aged horse for sale that just isn't fast enough, or cannot jump high enough, or just can't really do cattle--YOU name the sport--and the owner is looking to move up to a better candidate and sell their horse.
THIS is the best candidate for a beginner.
They have 1,000's of hours under saddle.
They have been trimmed, shod and hooves picked every day and are easy to groom.
They accept tacking up and will teach a beginner and be PATIENT.
They have been trailered EVERYWHERE and load easily.
They understand what it means to be tied up for hours.
They will tolerate a beginner making mistakes and won't buck, rear, bolt or fight and FRIGHTEN a beginning rider.
THIS WILL TAKE SOME TIME, but it's cheaper to spend the time and REALLY hunt and be willing to walk away from the wrong horse, and it's cheaper than a trip to the ER, a hospital stay, or a permanent injury.
Horses are 8x-10x bigger than us, so you have to be careful.

CLaPorte432 09-24-2013 12:53 PM

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Just a suggestion on breeds. Look into the Curly. Yes...Curly. (Bashkir Curly) They are a giant puppy dog. Very forgiving, quiet and easy to work with.

There will always be exceptions to every breed, but every Curly I have ever worked with, 50+, have had incredibly easy going dispositions.

plus they are just adorable.
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BlueSpark 09-24-2013 06:17 PM

I suggest you save up a significant amount. Unless you want to get a senior or something unsound, a true beginners horse is worth a lot. Around here the true, forgiving, sound beginners horse, say 10-17 years old, go from $3000 and up

Zexious 09-24-2013 06:28 PM

I mean, you really can't go wrong with Quarter Horses... but, like Corporal said, it's more about their experience than the breed. Look for something older, something that has 'been there, done that'. An old school master, or a kid's 4H horse, for example. What kind of riding does your sister want to do?

swimminchikin 09-24-2013 06:40 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by CLaPorte432 (Post 3714761)
Just a suggestion on breeds. Look into the Curly. Yes...Curly. (Bashkir Curly) They are a giant puppy dog. Very forgiving, quiet and easy to work with.

There will always be exceptions to every breed, but every Curly I have ever worked with, 50+, have had incredibly easy going dispositions.

plus they are just adorable.
Posted via Mobile Device

Cute. Yes. Adorable. Definitely.

I had 3 and they were all nuts and had major health issues. I'm sure there are good ones out there but I myself will never touch the breed again. ( I would suggest you not base your decision on my opinion and experience. ) I'm sure there are good ones out there I just never had the pleasure of meeting them.

Personally I love my quarter horses. They are sane, level headed and smart. I agree with others that training is key, but I don't think it hurts to look for breeds and bloodlines that are bred specifically for good temperments and quiet personalities. Its nowhere near a guarantee, but it doesn't hurt to watch for that. Good luck with your search!
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ForeverSunRider 09-24-2013 06:44 PM

I'm not sure she really knows. So we're just looking for a good everyday trail horse. It doesn't really have to be anything special. Doesn't have to come from famous lines or anything.

ForeverSunRider 10-02-2013 09:12 PM

What do you know, her horse just fell into our lap. If you've seen my posts about the rescue horse - he's going to be hers. We got him for free and I took him out and worked him today. He's the most gentle, easy going horse I've ever worked with. He's 10 and more chill than my 17 year old gelding and my 15 year old mare.

We have to see how well my sister and him pair up once he gets fully back to working condition, but it shouldn't be much of an issue.

Thanks for your advice :)

farahmay 10-19-2013 01:58 PM

I first rode a 6year old Arabian, and now a 5 year old thoroughbred. Despite everyone saying they're too hotheaded for a beginner, the were the best horses ever.

I would reccommend a thoroughbred because they tend to have smoother trots and canters. This would make her life easier.

But hey, remember that every horse is an individual.
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