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Appaloosas 05-24-2009 04:58 PM

Teaching how to ride?
 
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Hi everyone,
I have a 3 year old mare. Supposidly Appaloosa and Buckskin, but somebody else told me a POA. She is 13.2 hands.
She is just a lover, lets me do anything to her. Pick her feet up, check her teeth, sit on her, etc. She's tame as a pup, but I would like to know eventually how to teach her to ride?

smrobs 05-24-2009 05:30 PM

I would suggest that you find a good trainer to work with you and her if you want to train her yourself. Please don't try to do it yourself without help, that is too big of a risk and you could end up hurt. Either send her away to a trainer or have one help you EVERY step of the way. That is great that she is such a sweetie right now, but believe me, sometimes their attitude takes a complete 180 when it comes time for real training.

Joshie 05-24-2009 05:41 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Appaloosas (Post 313596)
Hi everyone,
I have a 3 year old mare. Supposidly Appaloosa and Buckskin, but somebody else told me a POA.

Welcome to The Horse Forum! From your question, I am guessing that you don't have a lot of horsey experience. I'd suggest that you send her to a trainer. Is your girl registered? If she is, that'd tell you what type of horse she is. Otherwise, she's a grade equine.


POA is a breed of equine that can be as tall as 14 h. Pony of the Americas Club, Inc. Official Website

Appaloosas are also a breed of horse.
Welcome to the Official Web site of the Appaloosa Horse Club

Buckskin is a color.
http://www.ansi.okstate.edu/breeds/h...kskin-aqha.jpg

Vidaloco 05-24-2009 06:46 PM

Ask at local feed and tack stores, or other horse related places for trainers in your area. I was on craigslist today and was amazed how many trainers were listed in my area. Check references before you chose one though.
As everyone else said, it is much easier and safer if you have someone to help you the first time training a horse to ride.
Your mare is lovely, very pretty color

dewaynehousehorsemanship 05-24-2009 08:36 PM

yeah i would get a trainer thats willing to work with you and your horse. Starting a horse is a hard task when your not real sure what to do. Those first 30 days are the most important of their life to come because its the foundation of what they will become. Get a trainer that you know will do it as natural as it can be done. Whats your location and maybe i can recomend some that I know of.

Calamity Jane 05-25-2009 03:42 PM

A trainer is definitely your best bet.

Ideal would be a trainer who trains her AND you. So, the trainer gets the horse started well, and shows you how to handle her and so you can practice, too with the help of your trainer.

If you don't have the option of being there every day of training, at least go once a week to see the progress AND to get some hands on experience as well.

I wouldn't recommend simply sending her away and waiting til you get her back to start working with her. You need to know what's going on, and how to handle her,...it's a process. So, the more training you get alongside your horse, the better you both will be.

twogeldings 05-26-2009 11:40 AM

Firstly, what is your experience with horses? Have you trained before? Have you ridden advanced mounts (i.e, horses that spook, buck, rear, bolt on a regular basis)

Training is a very time consuming process that requires a patient mind and a firm hand. If done improperly, the resulting horse can be dangerous and unpredictable. Improper training can also cause life-long mental and physical damage, and can in short completely wreck a horse. Improper training can also implant bad behaviors such as kicking, biting and rearing.

Even the most calm, quiet colt or filly can turn into a bucking bronco under saddle. It is very dangerous unless done by experienced persons who know how to stop bad behavior before they begin. An unexperienced trainer can end up dead or injured.

You need to know how to lay a strong ground foundation before you build the house. If your foundation is weak or incorrect, your house with fall.

I am very supportive of training your own horses. But sometimes, some things are better left to a qualified trainer.

Appaloosas 05-27-2009 05:48 PM

I have been riding for 8 years now. I have been on rearing, bucking, biting, sitting (sat on another horse lol) one that wanted to back down a steep hill, and well trained horses. I know how to trim hooves, tack em up, etc. But this is the first horse I have ever owned. I sat on her back for the first time yesterday; and she was ok with it at first, then decided to buck. Not very hard, just enough to get me off. Then she came walking up to me with the look of "hey, why'd you fall off?" rofl. She doesn't buck when on a lead though?
I will have a look around my area for a trainer, I would prefer to be there as often as possible.


Quote:

Originally Posted by twogeldings (Post 314807)
Firstly, what is your experience with horses? Have you trained before? Have you ridden advanced mounts (i.e, horses that spook, buck, rear, bolt on a regular basis)

Training is a very time consuming process that requires a patient mind and a firm hand. If done improperly, the resulting horse can be dangerous and unpredictable. Improper training can also cause life-long mental and physical damage, and can in short completely wreck a horse. Improper training can also implant bad behaviors such as kicking, biting and rearing.

Even the most calm, quiet colt or filly can turn into a bucking bronco under saddle. It is very dangerous unless done by experienced persons who know how to stop bad behavior before they begin. An unexperienced trainer can end up dead or injured.

You need to know how to lay a strong ground foundation before you build the house. If your foundation is weak or incorrect, your house with fall.

I am very supportive of training your own horses. But sometimes, some things are better left to a qualified trainer.


Solon 05-27-2009 06:40 PM

Yep, definitely find a good trainer that will work with you and the horse. That's going to be the safest way for both of you.

Have fun!

Joshie 05-27-2009 11:00 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Appaloosas (Post 315791)
I sat on her back for the first time yesterday; and she was ok with it at first, then decided to buck. Not very hard, just enough to get me off.

She looks awfully thin in that picture. I really don't think it's good for her to be ridden with her weight being so low.


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