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MinuitMouse 09-30-2013 10:16 PM

How much does/should it cost?
 
I'm not boarding, but I'm still wondering, for future reference


how much should it cost?


what should it provide? Food and water, field and shelter, blanket and fly mask, bug spray. What else?

should you charge them for their horses to use your blankets, halter, lead, etc? In the cost of boarding for a couple more dollars?

anything else?

i am not using the farm for boarding as of now, but would like to, to get some extra dollars in andhelp pay for the cost of our pony

Dreamcatcher Arabians 09-30-2013 10:27 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by MinuitMouse (Post 3763394)
I'm not boarding, but I'm still wondering, for future reference


how much should it cost? Fees will depend a lot on your area and what you offer. Some offer different levels of care for different prices. ie: pasture board vs stall board, self care vs full care


what should it provide? Food and water, field and shelter, blanket and fly mask, bug spray. What else? Hay, salt & water are normal, some include a certain amount of grain, some offer grain for an upcharge, some have the owner provide the grain. I've never seen blankets, fly sheets, masks or sprays included. The owner provides those if they're wanted. Stalls and/or field shelters, if available. Some kind of shelter from the elements, even if it's only a wooded area.

should you charge them for their horses to use your blankets, halter, lead, etc? In the cost of boarding for a couple more dollars? If you provide those things, then yes, you would charge for them. However, the care and disinfecting from horse to horse would be more work than it would be worth, to me.
anything else? Not really, you're really just talking about a place where someone can "store" their horse, if they don't have their own facilities. You can go all the way to rehabbing, lay up, fitting for show or track, full training if you have a trainer, let your mind run wild.

i am not using the farm for boarding as of now, but would like to, to get some extra dollars in andhelp pay for the cost of our pony

Make sure the prices you charge cover the costs of doing business, such as repairs to the fencing and facilities, feed, water, electricity, liability insurance, etc.

Incitatus32 09-30-2013 11:08 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by MinuitMouse (Post 3763394)
I'm not boarding, but I'm still wondering, for future reference


how much should it cost?
It will depend on your area. Usually I see BO's go and see how much hay (or grain) costs and then add in that cost to the amount they've set for rental. In my area for field board it's around $100-200 and stall board's around $300-$400.


what should it provide? Food and water, field and shelter, blanket and fly mask, bug spray. What else?
My barn includes all that you mentioned before (although some fields don't have a shelter but I don't mind). For stalls she also cleans them and provides an area to work horses (and lets boarders use her pastures to work in). The blankets and fly masks though fall under the below category. We also have a mosh pit of brushes that have just congregated from other boarders and the BO so everyone just shares.

should you charge them for their horses to use your blankets, halter, lead, etc? In the cost of boarding for a couple more dollars?
Where I'm at any halter and leadrope goes. If you don't want yours used then tell the BO to pass along to the boarders and/or put it in the tack room. Other then that it's bring your own, although nobody minds sharing for a while or for a small fee if you don't have one for a while!
anything else?
I would say look after the horses. As a BO I feel that it's your responsibility that if my horse looks lame in the field you will at least go check and make sure it's not bleeding to death. Also, if my horse needs a stall but I haven't set it up to be on stall board I would love it if a BO would work something out and be flexible. In my experience this leads to quality boarders who have no qualms paying. Being a BO is hard but I feel it can work out nicely. Also: a contract is your friend, especially in the finance area!

i am not using the farm for boarding as of now, but would like to, to get some extra dollars in andhelp pay for the cost of our pony

That's really all the advice I can give! Hope it works out!

DuckDodgers 10-01-2013 01:46 AM

Easy answer? It depends on the area. The cost will depend on the services that you provide- do you provide grain and hay? Stall cleaning and turnout? Worming? Blanketing? Stall or pasture board? Do you have an arena available?

Either way, decide what you are capable of doing, figure out how much you must charge to break even (keeping in mind you must charge enough to cover feed/hay, property repair, shavings, and you time!) and compare this price to others in the area with comparable services/amenities. It does you no good if your prices are high enough to scare away potential clients, but you want to make sure that your expenses are covered at a minimum. Keeping a bunch of horses boarded grain-free on your land is much less expensive than providing full-service board with arenas and trails, but people are expecting to pay less for fewer services ;)

plomme 10-01-2013 02:05 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by MinuitMouse (Post 3763394)
I'm not boarding, but I'm still wondering, for future reference


how much should it cost?


what should it provide? Food and water, field and shelter, blanket and fly mask, bug spray. What else?

should you charge them for their horses to use your blankets, halter, lead, etc? In the cost of boarding for a couple more dollars?

anything else?

How much it should cost depends on your location, your facilities, and what you offer. It could be $200, it could be $700. Basic board usually includes grain, hay, stall cleaning, and turn in/out. Some people charge extra for blankets and boots on/off, feeding supplements, holding for vet/farrier/whoever else or it is included in the boarding price. Some have a limit on blanket changes. Some charge extra for grooming, fly spray, lungeing, or exercise riding if the owner can't be there. I have not heard of the barn owner providing halters, leads, and blankets. Some barns require using a certain farrier or vet, others are fine with whoever you want, some schedule farrier visits for the whole barn while others leave it up to individual boarders. Some barns want all the horses to be on the same vaccination and worming schedule. Some require owners to provide grain. Some require boarders to portion supplements into daily doses. Some allow trailer parking for free or for a fee.

Consider how hands-on you want to be, how consistent you want care to be, what happens if boarders go on holiday. If your boarders are mostly working adults who can't do a lot of daily horse care or be there when vets and farriers come your service has to be different than boarders who are there daily and can/want to be very hands-on. Consider if you will reduce board in exchange for barn work. Think about whether or not you will take retirees, stallions, young horses, if you want a particular mix of geldings and mares, if you will offer individual or paired turn out or only group, if you will welcome outside trainers.

Talk to people about the kind of boarding they like and why and who your customers will be. If you have boarded, think about what you liked and what you didn't. Casual pleasure riders may have different requirements than performance riders, the culture will be different if your barn is mostly full of teenagers vs. working people vs. housewives. Some barns screen clients to create a particular atmosphere or to make sure boarders fit into the atmosphere whereas others accept anyone.


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