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-   -   Question about worming.. Please read. (http://www.horseforum.com/horse-health/question-about-worming-please-read-28903/)

ShannonSevenfold 06-02-2009 08:43 PM

Question about worming.. Please read.
 
What is the best system for rotational worming? What brands do you use, how often, etc.?

Ryle 06-02-2009 11:48 PM

There is no best system for rotational deworming. That type of program is no longer considered an appropriate deworming program by the equine veterinarians and parasitologists.

I would highly recommend that you check out the new deworming webinar on www.thehorse.com It's only a couple of weeks old and has great, detailed information on planning a deworming program
The Horse: Videos

Horses in the US should only be dewormed 2-4 times a year depending on their situation and their own natural resistance to parasites.

ShannonSevenfold 06-02-2009 11:54 PM

2-4 times a year? Wow. That's changed since...whenever the last time was that I read something about worming.

kchfuller 06-03-2009 01:17 PM

dang i thought it was every 6-8 weeks! thanks Ryle for bringing me into the 21st century (i didn't think i was that old, only 25 lol- but i guess i got skipped with that memo)

riccil0ve 06-03-2009 01:24 PM

Well I worm every three months. Well... except my filly, the vet said she should be wormed once a month her first year.

Oh, and I don't have a set pattern of brands, I just always get a different wormer than I got the last time.

Nutty Saddler 06-03-2009 04:30 PM

Many horses that get wormers on a regular basis don't need worming.
Have you considered the option of having a worm count done instead - this will tell you if your horse has worms or not , you may find that you don't need a wormer at all.

Ryle 06-03-2009 04:36 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by riccil0ve (Post 320117)
Well I worm every three months. Well... except my filly, the vet said she should be wormed once a month her first year.

Oh, and I don't have a set pattern of brands, I just always get a different wormer than I got the last time.

Then you really need to watch that deworming webinar. You should have at least a set pattern spring and fall---ivermectin/praziquantel or moxidectin/praziquantel. And during the winter months you are in an area where reinfection rates are going to be very low so deworming isn't necessary for adult horses. At temps below 45 degrees, strongyle eggs don't mature into infective larva so can't reinfect your horses.

You are also likely deworming with ineffective drugs for strongyles at fenbendazole has a VERY HIGH incidence of strongyles being resistant to it (more than 90% of areas tested show resistance worldwide) and pyrantel has resistance issues in about 1/2 of the areas tested in studies.

Even veterinary recommendations tend to be way out-of-date these days because vets tend to spend their continuing education time and money on more interesting topics like surgery, endocrine disorders, lameness, etc.

cowgirl4jesus94 06-03-2009 04:36 PM

My vet said to use quest (spring) (lasts 3 months) then panacur, then strongid and then ivermectin. and that should finish out the year.

nutty saddler; how do you have the worm count done?

Nutty Saddler 06-03-2009 04:43 PM

If you talk to your vet they should be able to advise you . It normally involves sending some samples to a lab .

Ryle 06-03-2009 04:47 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by cowgirl4jesus94 (Post 320224)
My vet said to use quest (spring) (lasts 3 months) then panacur, then strongid and then ivermectin. and that should finish out the year.

nutty saddler; how do you have the worm count done?

But panacur should only be used IF you have tested to ensure that you don't have resistant strongyles---it's a very common problem. And strongid (pyrantel) also should be tested as well to ensure that parasites aren't resistant to it. So many vets simply don't know that the resistance problem with these drugs is as widespread as it is and so they do the easy thing and just recommend a "standard" deworming program. There is no one-size-fits-all deworming program for horses. Most need much fewer dewormings than they get.

Fecal egg counts are run by your vet or a veterinary diagnostic lab. Unlike the typical fecal floatation that most vets run (and that is fine in dogs and cats, but not in horses) it is a quantitative test meaning that it gives you the number of strongyle eggs found in 1 gram of feces. This helps you to determine the recontamination potential of your horse (more eggs mean he leaves more new parasites in your pasture to ingest). A fecal floatation is simply a yes or no---you have ascarids or strongyles or you don't. But a fecal float isn't run on a set quantity of feces and a count isn't performed so you can't know if your horse is a high or low shedder.
Fecal egg counts should be performed on every horse in a herd during the season when parasite reinfection rates are highest---winter in the southern US and summer in the northern US). The sample should be collected 3 months after your spring deworming if you used ivermectin or 4 months if you used moxidectin. Then you can determine if your horse has a high or low natuaral resistance and thus if he needs to be dewormed 2, 3 or 4 times a year.


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